Elizabeth W. A Level English Literature tutor, GCSE English Literatur...

Elizabeth W.

Currently unavailable: for regular students

Degree: Theatre: Writing, Directing and Performance (Masters) - York University

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About me

About me

I'm a Masters student at the University of York, studying Theatre: Writing, Directing and Performance. In 2014 I achieved a 2:1 in my BA (Hons) in English and American Literature from the University of Kent, specialising in Elizabethan and Jacobean drama. I have always loved the theatre and literature, but my passions also lie in history and French (having studied French joint with English during my first year at university).

I am very patient and easy going. Between finishing my degree and starting my MA, I was employed as an English Intervention Tutor at a high school in Essex. I am incredibly familiar with the Cambridge English Language GCSE paper, and both the Language and Literature GCSE papers with Edexcel. I have also tutored children in both French and English as a foreign language to native French speakers, therefore I have a lot of experience in tutoring and education.

What can I study?

I can help you with:

- English Literature A Level

- English Literature GCSE

- English Language GCSE

- French GCSE

- History GCSE

- English as a foreign language

What will the sessions be like?

That's up to you! You will guide the sessions with me - just let me know which exam board you're using and what you're struggling with, then we can get going with helping you to understand. The lessons will be fun and engaging - we can fit a lot into each session!

If you have any questions please contact me via WebMail, or book a Meet The Tutor session! (Both are available on this website.)

I look forward to meeting you!

Subjects offered

SubjectLevelMy prices
English Literature A Level £22 /hr
English Language GCSE £20 /hr
English Literature GCSE £20 /hr
French GCSE £20 /hr
History GCSE £20 /hr

Qualifications

QualificationLevelGrade
English LiteratureBachelors Degree2:1
English LiteratureA-LevelA
FrenchA-LevelA
HistoryA-LevelB
Disclosure and Barring Service

CRB/DBS Standard

17/11/2014

CRB/DBS Enhanced

No

Currently unavailable: for regular students

Questions Elizabeth has answered

How do I write a good conclusion?

To write a conclusion, you simply need to answer the main question of the essay, or, if it is a discussion topic, explain what you have discovered in your essay.  You should not add a new point to your argument, but summarise what you have already said.  Always finish with a snappy sentence.

To write a conclusion, you simply need to answer the main question of the essay, or, if it is a discussion topic, explain what you have discovered in your essay.  You should not add a new point to your argument, but summarise what you have already said.  Always finish with a snappy sentence.

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1 year ago

366 views

How should I structure an essay with the question beginning "How far do you agree..."?

A question beginning with "How far do you agree..." is a blessing in disguise, because it allows you to explore the agreement and the disagreement with the matter in hand.  After your introduction, in which you should display your understanding of the question and state your first judgement on...

A question beginning with "How far do you agree..." is a blessing in disguise, because it allows you to explore the agreement and the disagreement with the matter in hand.  After your introduction, in which you should display your understanding of the question and state your first judgement on the issue, your first paragraph should state your thesis, i.e. your arguments agreeing.  Following this should be a paragraph following the antithesis, i.e. your arguments disagreeing.  You should have a clear line of argument by now and have made a decision about whether you agree or disagree.  So now comes the synthesis, which explains your viewpoint clearly using examples from the text (although you should be using examples throughout).  You must be careful not to repeat anything in your conclusion, but you must now answer the question.  "How far do you agree...?"

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1 year ago

1565 views

What is a biased source?

If a source has a bias, it means that the author of it had a personal interest in the subject they were writing about.  We will take the Bayeux tapestry as an example.  In 1066 there was a battle for the crown of England between Harold, and Englishman, and William, a Frenchman.  This was known...

If a source has a bias, it means that the author of it had a personal interest in the subject they were writing about.  We will take the Bayeux tapestry as an example.  In 1066 there was a battle for the crown of England between Harold, and Englishman, and William, a Frenchman.  This was known as the Battle of Hastings.  The Bayeux tapestry is a French depiction of the events leading up to the battle, and the battle itself.  It clearly shows that William was the rightful king because it was a biased source (remember that William was French and the tapestry is French).  Any English source from the time would argue that Harold was the rightful king, because they would also be biased.

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1 year ago

609 views
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