Henry  P. Mentoring French tutor, GCSE French tutor, Mentoring Spanis...

Henry P.

Currently unavailable: for regular students

Degree: Modern Foreign Languages (Bachelors) - Durham University

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About me

I love languages! I studied French & German up to A-level, I did a 1 year Polish course in Krakow, I learnt conversational Dutch over the course of two summers working in a Dutch-owned campsite in France and now at university I am continuing French and have started Spanish. 

So why is that relevant? Well, it's taught me a lot about the process of learning a language and I am very confident I can help you. I take a conversation-based approach, meaning we won't be talking about learning the language but actually practising and bettering your skills. I'll encourage you to make mistakes, I'll help get to the bottom of why you're making them rather than just correcting them and I hope to help you discover just how awesome it is to be able to express yourself in a foreign language!

Subjects offered

SubjectLevelMy prices
French A Level £20 /hr
French GCSE £18 /hr
Spanish GCSE £18 /hr

Qualifications

QualificationLevelGrade
GermanA-LevelA
FrenchA-LevelA
HistoryA-LevelA*
Disclosure and Barring Service

CRB/DBS Standard

No

CRB/DBS Enhanced

No

Currently unavailable: for regular students

Questions Henry has answered

Why do some verbs take 'etre' in the perfect tense? And how can I memorise them?

The majority of French verbs are take a conjugated form of the verb 'avoir' (to have) when forming the perfect tense, similarly to English. However, there is an important minority of verbs that use a conjugated form of the verb 'etre' (to be) when forming this tense. These verbs are called int...

The majority of French verbs are take a conjugated form of the verb 'avoir' (to have) when forming the perfect tense, similarly to English. However, there is an important minority of verbs that use a conjugated form of the verb 'etre' (to be) when forming this tense. These verbs are called intransitive verbs, meaning that they do not take a direct object. These verbs often refer to a change in state or place, and although there aren't many, they are very important! 

For example;
J'ai vu la montre - I've seen the watch (watch = direct object)
Je suis descendu - I went down (no direct object) 

Fortunately there's a nice trick to memorise these verbs. All you have to do is meet MRS VAN DER TRAMP, the agreable Dutch lady who never objects! 

Monter --> monté (went up)
Retourner --> retourné (returned)
Sortir --> sorti (went out)

Venir --> venu (came)
Arriver --> arrivé (arrived)
Naître --> né (was born)

Descendre --> descendu (went down)
Entrer --> entré (entered)
Rester --> resté (stayed)

Tomber --> tombé (fell)
Rentrer --> rentré (went back in)
Aller --> allé (went)
Mourir --> mort (died)
Partir --> parti (left)

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1 year ago

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