Aaron H. Mentoring -Medical School Preparation- tutor, Mentoring -Per...
£20 - £22 /hr

Aaron H.

Degree: Graduate Entry Medicine (MB ChB) (Bachelors) - Bristol University

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About me

A little about me:

After graduating with a BSc degree in Physiological Science (how the body works) I applied to study medicine as a graduate and am now studying to be a doctor at the University of Bristol. 

I am fascinated by how the human body functions (and how to fix it when it goes wrong); as a tutor I can showcase my enthusiasm for my subject, and inspire the students that I teach.

I am very patient, approachable and friendly and I’m willing to spend as long as it takes for you to fully understand the topics that we learn. 

I understand that everyone learns at a different pace so, if you are finding certain topics challenging when everyone else seems to understand it easily, don’t worry, that’s why I’m here to help!

My teaching experience:

During my undergraduate degree I taught biology from GCSE through to A-level at Clifton College, a leading independent boarding and day school in Bristol. https://www.cliftoncollege.com/upper/

This was as part of the Undergraduate Ambassadorial Scheme (UAS) and it allowed me to shadow many different teachers to learn a variety of teaching styles.  My dissertation involved research into the active learning approach to teaching science and the importance of centring learning around ‘real world’ examples.  

I am well practiced at UCAS applications and medical school preparation.  Whilst at Clifton College I conducted mock university admission interviews and reviewed student’s personal statements.  This being said, I am more than happy to mentor you through your university and medical school applications!

What next?

Why not book a ‘Meet the Tutor Session’ with me so I can introduce myself?

We can discuss what it is you’re struggling with and come up with an ‘action-plan’ and take it from there. 

The tutorials will be heavily directed by you and what you want to learn!  My job is to make the learning as fun and relaxed as possible so that you really enjoy what you’re studying.

Subjects offered

SubjectLevelMy prices
Human Biology A Level £22 /hr
Human Biology GCSE £20 /hr
-Medical School Preparation- Mentoring £22 /hr
-Personal Statements- Mentoring £22 /hr

Qualifications

QualificationLevelGrade
Physiological ScienceBachelors Degree2:1
ChemistryA-LevelA
BiologyA-LevelA
PsychologyA-LevelA
GeographyA-LevelA
Disclosure and Barring Service

CRB/DBS Standard

No

CRB/DBS Enhanced

06/11/2014

General Availability

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Please get in touch for more detailed availability

Questions Aaron has answered

Describe the effect of calcium ions on tropomyosin and actin in skeletal muscle.

Within the muscle fibre tropomyosin is wrapped around actin filaments and it blocks the binding sites for the myosin-heads. When calcium ion concentration increases, calcium ions bind to sites on the tropomyosin (troponin-c sites) and this causes a conformational change in shape. This cha...

Within the muscle fibre tropomyosin is wrapped around actin filaments and it blocks the binding sites for the myosin-heads.

When calcium ion concentration increases, calcium ions bind to sites on the tropomyosin (troponin-c sites) and this causes a conformational change in shape.

This change in tropomyosin’s shape exposes the myosin-head binding sites on the actin filaments and allows cross-bridge binding to occur.

This then allows the actin and myosin fibres to slide over each other and shorten (contract) the muscle fibre.  This is known as Sliding Filament Theory.  

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1 year ago

341 views

Describe the roles of DNA and RNA in determining the sequence of amino acids in proteins.

The sequence of bases (a gene) on DNA determines the order of amino acids that come together to form a polypeptide (protein) chain. The DNA is 'unzipped' by enzymes called Helicases. This allows a single strand of DNA to be copied (transcription) to form a molecule of messenger RNA (mRNA). Th...

The sequence of bases (a gene) on DNA determines the order of amino acids that come together to form a polypeptide (protein) chain.

The DNA is 'unzipped' by enzymes called Helicases. This allows a single strand of DNA to be copied (transcription) to form a molecule of messenger RNA (mRNA).

The mRNA then leaves the nucleus through the nuclear pores and enters the cytoplasm.

In the cytoplasm the mRNA associates with a ribosome.

Free amino acids within the cytoplasm are brought together in the correct order (determined by the sequence of the mRNA) to form a polypeptide chain (protein).

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1 year ago

268 views

Explain how voltage-gated sodium ion channels on the membranes of neurones generate an action potential.

At rest there is a difference in the concentration of sodium ions (Na+) across the membrane of the neurone. Outside the neurone in the extracellular fluid (ECF) the concentration of Na+ is around 140 mEq/L whereas inside in the intracellular fluid (ICF) it is about 14 mEq/L. This difference ...

At rest there is a difference in the concentration of sodium ions (Na+) across the membrane of the neurone.

Outside the neurone in the extracellular fluid (ECF) the concentration of Na+ is around 140 mEq/L whereas inside in the intracellular fluid (ICF) it is about 14 mEq/L.

This difference in concentration of Na+ creates a strong concentration gradient across the membrane.

When there is a change in voltage, the voltage-gated Na+ channels open.  This allows the Na+ to flow through the membrane from outside to inside, down the concentration gradient.

Normally the inside of the neurone has a negative charge but, when large amounts of Na+ flood into the neurone when the channels open this makes the inside of the neurone have a positive charge.

This change in charge from negative to positive is knows as depolarisation and this generates an action potential that travels down the neurone (axon). 

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1 year ago

276 views
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