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About me

About Me I'm a third year student at Exeter University. I've been passionate about maths from a young age and have carried that love through my school and uni career. I hope that I can generate the same passion for my tutees as well. I'm a patient and friendly person, and have always enjoyed helping friends and family with their work. I enjoy teaching people about my subject and I will always bring enthusiasm to our sessions. The Sessions You guide the topics that we will cover in our sessions. I'll make sure you understand the basics before we tackle the harder topics, once you have basic understanding of a topic, the rest falls into place. I will do my best to find out what style of learner you are so that I can tailor each tutorial to you, such as including more examples, more diagrams or by finding new ways of explaining ideas. I will not simply talk at you, I will be engaging and make sure that any question you have is answered. What Next? If you have any questions, don't hesitate, send me a "WebMail" or organise a Free Trial Session, I look forward to meeting you!

Subjects offered

SubjectLevelMy prices
Maths A Level £26 /hr
Maths GCSE £24 /hr

Qualifications

QualificationLevelGrade
MathsA-LevelA*
Further MathsA-LevelA
ChemistryA-LevelA
Disclosure and Barring Service

CRB/DBS Standard

No

CRB/DBS Enhanced

No

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Ratings and reviews

5from 53 customer reviews

Emma (Parent) March 8 2017

Reliable, conscientious and patient tutor.

Thomas (Student) March 8 2017

Another constructive lesson, thank you

Emma (Parent) February 26 2017

James always manages to get across how to approach questions and is supportive in his teaching. Always fell positive after a session.

Judith (Parent) December 21 2016

good
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Questions James has answered

How do you differentiate X to the power of a?

To differentiate Xa, where a is any real number, you multiply X by a, and subtract 1 from the power. i.e. d(Xa)/dX=aXa-1

To differentiate Xa, where a is any real number, you multiply X by a, and subtract 1 from the power.

i.e. d(Xa)/dX=aXa-1

2 years ago

530 views

How to prove that (from i=0 to n)Σi^2= (n/6)(n+1)(2n+1), by induction.

First you must show that the statement on the right hand side is true for n=1: Σi=0 i2 when n=1, is equal to 12=1 (1/6)(1+1)(1+2)=(1/6)(2)(3)=1 This means that the statement is true for n=1. Next you assume that it is true for 'k', where k is any number, and so you get; Σi=0 i2 when n=k, is ...

First you must show that the statement on the right hand side is true for n=1:

Σi=0 iwhen n=1, is equal to 12=1

(1/6)(1+1)(1+2)=(1/6)(2)(3)=1

This means that the statement is true for n=1.

Next you assume that it is true for 'k', where k is any number, and so you get;

Σi=0 i2 when n=k, is equal to (k/6)(k+1)(2k+2)

You then have to show that the statement is true for n=k+1 which would make;

Σi=0 i2 when n=k+1, is equal to (k+1)/6(k+2)(2k+3) call this 1)

As the left hand side is a sum, it can be written as;

Σi=0 i2 when n=k + (k+1)2

We already know the sum of i2 when n=k and so we can substitute it in;

(k/6)(k+1)(2k+1) + (k+1)2

We then try and reach 1)

We can factorise out (k+1)

(k+1)[(k/6)(2k+1) +k+1]

Next, multiply the inner brackets;

(k+1)[2k2/6+k/6 +k+1]

Take out a factor of 1/6

(k+1)/6(2k2+k+6k+6)= (k+1)/6(2k2+7k+6)

Finally, factorise the inner bracket;

(k+1)/6(k+2)(2k+3)

As this is equal to 1), we have proven that the statement is true for all values of n.

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2 years ago

979 views

What is "Standard Form"?

Standard form is a way of writing large numbers to make them more compact, for example Instead of writing: 197,000,000 We say: 197,000,000= 1.97 x 100,000,000 And so we can write: 1.97 x 108, which is more concise.

Standard form is a way of writing large numbers to make them more compact, for example

Instead of writing:

197,000,000

We say:

197,000,000= 1.97 x 100,000,000

And so we can write:

1.97 x 108, which is more concise.

see more

2 years ago

555 views
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