Giulia F. A Level Classical Greek tutor, A Level Latin tutor, A Level...

Giulia F.

Currently unavailable: for regular students

Degree: International Relations with History of Art (Bachelors) - Exeter University

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About me

A bit about me...
My name is Giulia and I am a third year International Relations with Art History student at the University of Exeter. My high school Diploma was Humanities-oriented, since I've always had a great fondness for subjects such as Philosophy, Art History, Latin, Greek, Literature... I have tutored various student throughout high school, mainly doing Latin and Greek Literature and Translation, and I tutored my brother in Philosophy to prepare him for his Diploma exam. I have also been a Student Mentor in my second year at University, so I guess you could say a have a bit of experience! The main thing is that I am genuinely passionate about Humanities and my goal is to ensure that you become confident about what you learn and that you also enjoy doing it. 

What will we do during each session?
You will choose the focus of the sessions and we will go over the topics you picked so that they are clear. I will use learning-aids such as conceptual maps, diagrams, summaries and I will also share my personal notes from high school with you. One of my preferred methods is to help you connect the dots between different subjects; Humanities subjects developed interconnectedly, influencing each other, and this approach will make you appreciate the how multi-faceted they are! 

Finally...
If you have any questions, you can contact me through my WebMail, but you can also book a "Meet the Tutor" session. I look forward to meeting you! :)

Subjects offered

SubjectLevelMy prices
Classical Greek A Level £20 /hr
Italian A Level £20 /hr
Latin A Level £20 /hr
Philosophy A Level £20 /hr

Qualifications

QualificationLevelGrade
Art HistoryA-LevelA*
Classical GreekA-LevelA
PhilosophyA-LevelA*
Italian language and literatureA-LevelA*
LatinA-LevelA
Disclosure and Barring Service

CRB/DBS Standard

No

CRB/DBS Enhanced

No

Currently unavailable: for regular students

Questions Giulia has answered

Explain Petrarch's attitude towards Classic literature.

Petrarch actively rejected the present because his passion for antiquity led him to claim a privileged relationship with Classic culture. He believed that reading Classical literature was a way for mankind to gaze into itself and understand itself in a morally-charged perspective. His fondness...

Petrarch actively rejected the present because his passion for antiquity led him to claim a privileged relationship with Classic culture. He believed that reading Classical literature was a way for mankind to gaze into itself and understand itself in a morally-charged perspective. His fondness for Classic literature brought him to attentively study many ancient codes and to compare different copies of the same work and apostillating them to guarantee as much accuracy as possible. He can be considered the first Philologist in the modern sense on the word because of his new modus legendi.
Petrarch also consistenly tried to harmonise the teachings of Classical culture with the Christian doctrine. He valued human dignity, believing that the combination of moral philosophy of Agostinian and Platonic matrix and of religion resulted in an original Humanism.

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1 year ago

282 views

Explain the relationship between Fortuna and Virtus in Ceasar

In Ceasar's speech after the battle of Dyrrhachium (during the 49 BC - 45 BC Civil War), a battle which supposedly Pompeius won, but with conspicuous casualties on both sides, we see magnifically exeplified the oratio post-cladem . In this specificoratio, Ceasar invited his soldiers to not feel...

In Ceasar's speech after the battle of Dyrrhachium (during the 49 BC - 45 BC Civil War), a battle which supposedly Pompeius won, but with conspicuous casualties on both sides, we see magnifically exeplified the oratio post-cladem. In this specific oratio, Ceasar invited his soldiers to not feel disheartened, because Fortuna ("luck") is on his side. Fortuna can be construed or helped by one's intelligence and sense of moderation, he explains. This is why Virtus and Fortuna are complementary concepts; the first prepares the ground for the advent of the second and when the latter should fail, a man's virtuous action and determination can help him achieve (and bring upon himself) res fortunae (happy events, good things). 

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1 year ago

269 views

What is the Second Sophistic?

The Second Sophistic was a Greek rhetorical movement dating back to the 1st century AD. It originated to fill the vacuum left by the decline of tragedy, comedy and political oratory. Compared to the First Rhetoric, it lacked the strictly philosophical component, and posed its emphasis on a dem...

The Second Sophistic was a Greek rhetorical movement dating back to the 1st century AD. It originated to fill the vacuum left by the decline of tragedy, comedy and political oratory. Compared to the First Rhetoric, it lacked the strictly philosophical component, and posed its emphasis on a demonstrative kind of rhetoric. The Sophists of the Second movement did not use their art to discover the truth through philosophical disquisition, rather they taught to master the art of words through the discussion of absurd theses. 
Their prose was extremely chiselled, fluid and Actic (ie. structured neatly and simply, with the use of concise words).
At the time, the word Sophist acquired an ambivalent meaning; the profession of the Sophist used to be a prestigious one. It was well-paid and therefore accessible mostly to the aristocracy. However, in addition to this, many did not consider moral that the Sohists taught how to bend the truth employing words; although their "playing the devil's advocate" was for purely didactical purposes, most believed that this practice, disconnected from philosophy and its quest for the truth, could only yield negative and immoral results.

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1 year ago

280 views
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