PremiumEmma M. GCSE Maths tutor, A Level Psychology tutor, A Level Maths tutor
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About me

 I am currently studying Natural Sciences (Maths and Psychology) at Durham University.

I have had a passion for Maths and Psychology since the moment I started studying them and am keen to share my enthusiasm for these subject through my tutorials.

In terms of tutoring experience, I have worked for Explore Learning, a tutoring company, for the last two years, tutoring students aged 4-15. In addition, I mentored students for essay structure in Psychology A level and I was a private maths tutor for 2 students studying GCSE maths, bringing both tutees up by 2 grades each. All of this has given me lots of experience in tutoring students of all ages and abilities.

I am very warm, approachable, fun and friendly, as well as being a very patient person, which are all traits that I will bring to my tutorials.

THE SESSIONS

I am able to offer tutorials in MATHS GCSE, MATHS A LEVEL and PSYCHOLOGY A LEVEL.

For Psychology, I am familiar with the AQA A specification.

For Maths, I am most familiar with Edexcel, but am able to tutor any exam board.

I will aim to make my tutorials as fun and enjoyable as possible, whilst also achieving the most out of the session.

I am keen to tailor my sessions to each individual tutee meaning that you guide what we cover, and will make my sessions extremely flexible and adaptable.

I am happy to go through specific parts of the syllabus which you are struggling with, exam technique, essay structure, or whatever else you may want to cover.

I am hoping to focus on improving my tutees’ confidence through the sessions, by using a variety of methods to explain concepts and work out which methods work best for each individual tutee.

WHAT’S NEXT?

If you want to find out any more information or book a trial session then send me a ‘Webmail’ or ‘Meet the Tutor Session’ through this website. Please tell me your exam board and what you are struggling with or would like to focus on in your initial sessions on.

I look forward to meeting you!

Subjects offered

SubjectLevelMy prices
Maths A Level £24 /hr
Psychology A Level £24 /hr
Maths GCSE £22 /hr

Qualifications

QualificationLevelGrade
MathematicsA-LevelA*
Further MathematicsA-LevelA
PsychologyA-LevelA*
ChemistryA-LevelA
Disclosure and Barring Service

CRB/DBS Standard

No

CRB/DBS Enhanced

17/09/2015

Ratings and reviews

4.7from 7 customer reviews

Louise (Parent) November 17 2016

Helped me understand a topic i struggled with alot.

H (Parent) February 20 2016

Emma is a fantastic teacher.

H (Parent) February 18 2016

i understood this topic very well after the tutor went through it with me.

Georgia (Student) December 10 2015

really good and really helped!
See all reviews

Questions Emma has answered

How do you differentiate y = 5 x^3 + 1/2 x^2 + 3x -4

FIrslty to avoid confusion: x = the variable x X = multiplication. When you differentiate an equation, the derivative (answer) is referred to as dy/dx. For a polynomial as in this question you take each term individually and differentiate that. Let's first do this for a generic term axb ...

FIrslty to avoid confusion:

x = the variable x

X = multiplication.

When you differentiate an equation, the derivative (answer) is referred to as dy/dx.

For a polynomial as in this question you take each term individually and differentiate that.

Let's first do this for a generic term axb and we will then apply it to thisquestion​​:

The formula for the derivative of axb is baxb-1​, which means you take the degree of x (whatever power it is being raised to, which in this case is b) and multiply it by the coefficient of x (which in this case in a) which provides the ba part of the solution. You then reduce the degree of x by one so it becomes xb-1 instead of just xb. Therefore when you put the two parts together you get the final derivative as baxb-1.​

Now let's look at the first term of our equation : 5x3​.

The degree here is 3 so the first thing you do is multiply 3 by the coefficient of x which is 5 giving you 3x5 which is 15​.

Next, you reduce the degree of x by 1. It was x3 so now it is x3-1 which is x2​.

Now you can put the two parts together to give the derivative of 5x3 being 15x2.

If you do the same thing for the next term, then you get (2x1/2)x2-1​ which is x.

For the third time the derivative is quite nice, if you just have a number followed by x such as 3x as we have here, to get the derivative you just remove the x, meaning the derivative is 3.

For the final term of the equation we just have a number. Whenever you differentiate a number on its own, the derivative is 0.

So now the final thing left to do is put our answer together. You need to take each of our 4 derivatives and simply add them together.

This would give you: 15x2​ + x + 3 + 0

Meaning the final answer dy/dx = 15x2​ + x + 3.

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1 year ago

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How do you write a good hypothesis?

The way to write a good hypothesis is to follow a 3 step proess. 1) Identify your variables and operationalise them. 2) Identify whether you are looking for a difference or a relationship. 3) Identify whether you are going to write a directional or non-directional hypothesis. As long as your...

The way to write a good hypothesis is to follow a 3 step proess.

1) Identify your variables and operationalise them.

2) Identify whether you are looking for a difference or a relationship.

3) Identify whether you are going to write a directional or non-directional hypothesis.

As long as your hypothesis includes these three things then it will be a strong statement.

Let's look at a specific example to see how we can do this:

The hypothesis we want to write is for a piece of research which is looking to see if the length of sleep impacts memory.

So let's go to step 1.

1) Our independent variable (which is the variable that we are able to change and manipulate) in this case is the ​length of sleep​, and the dependent variable (which we cannot control but is what we measure) for this piece of research is memory.​ But now we need to operationalise them. Operationalising variables means explain how we measure the variable. So for example we could operationalise length of sleep to be ​'people who slept more than 6 hours in comparison to people who slept less than 6 hours.'​ You often find that there are many ways to operationalise the dependent variable as something like memory can be measured in many ways. One way which you could operationalise the variable would be ​'number of words correctly recalled from a list.'

So now we have both our operationalised variables, we can move on to step two.

2) We need to decide if we are looking for a difference or a relationship. A difference would be if we are directly comparing two things, whereas a relationship would be showing how one thing impacts another. If you are testing for a difference then your hypothesis will sound something like 'group A is more/less/different to group B' whereas if you are testing for a relationship you will say ​'A increases/decreases/changes as B increases.' ​​For this piece of research we are comparing people with more than 6 hours of sleep with those who had less than 6 hours of sleep so we are looking for a ​difference​. This means our hypothesis will sound like ​'people who sleep more than 6 hours will .... more/less/differently to people who slept less than 6 hours.'

Now we can move onto the final step of writing the hypothesis.

3) A hypothesis can be written as either directional (when you predict what the results will show, and so say 'A will be more than B or A will be less than B') or it can be non-directional (which is when you know that there will be a difference but do not know which one will be more or less so write 'A will be significantly different to B'). You can pick which type of hypothesis you want to write (unless the exam question specifies!) but for this example let's write a directional hypothesis. If we predict that more sleep will improve your memory we would write people who sleep more will have better memories than people who sleep less.

But now let's put everything together and write our final excellent hypothesis.

'People who sleep for more than 6 hours will recall more words correctly from a list than those who slept for less than 6 hours.

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1 year ago

497 views
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