PremiumLewis G. A Level Maths tutor, GCSE Maths tutor, A Level Economics tut...

Lewis G.

Currently unavailable: for new students

Degree: MPhil in Economics Research (Masters) - Cambridge University

Contact Lewis
Send a message

All contact details will be kept confidential.

To give you a few options, we can ask three similar tutors to get in touch. More info.

Contact Lewis

About me

About me: I'm currently a graduate economics student at Cambridge University. Before Cambridge, I was at Warwick University, where I read Philosophy, Politics and Economics, graduating with First Class honours and ranked joint 1st overall in my graduating cohort. I have striven for the very highest academic results.  

I've tutored Cambridge graduates in maths, but I've also taught weekly sessions to 8 year old cub-scouts on topics from all over the sciences and maths!

Guiding thought: academic success depends on how much energy the student invests - which a tutor can dramatically alter - and how effective tuition itself is. Good tuition, like the Supervisions (tutorial sessions) at Cambridge, is a structured dialogue - not monologue - between student and tutor.

Academic success is a balancing act between stimulating subject immersion and keeping the target (exams) firmly in sight.

UCAS applications: the UCAS personal statement can be massively improved with the right advice, and I realise how much of my own I would change if I had had the right advice at the right time. If you're applying to study economics or PPE, I offer very targeted guidance.

Next moves: if you are interested to learn more, please send me a WebMail or book a 'Meet the tutor session', where we can assess exactly how I might help. 

Subjects offered

SubjectLevelMy prices
Economics A Level £30 /hr
Maths A Level £30 /hr
Maths GCSE £30 /hr

Qualifications

QualificationLevelGrade
Philosophy, Politics and EconomicsBachelors Degree1st
EconomicsMasters DegreeN/A
Disclosure and Barring Service

CRB/DBS Standard

No

CRB/DBS Enhanced

No

Currently unavailable: for new students

Ratings and reviews

4.9from 11 customer reviews

Fiona (Parent) May 10 2016

Excellent many thanks

Fiona (Parent) May 22 2016

Excellent many thanks

Fiona (Parent) May 29 2016

Lewis tutored my daughter during her Maths GCSE. My daughter found the sessions very helpful. He was able to make her feel relaxed and explained things very well. We would definitely recommend to others who are thinking of getting a Tutor. Thank you Lewis

Fiona (Parent) February 7 2016

Lewis is a very good tutor and he ensures he explains things in such a way that my daughter can understand. We would thoroughly recommend him to others.
See all reviews

Questions Lewis has answered

When using the addition rule in probability, why must we subtract the "intersection" to find the "union" with the Addition Rule?

There is a subtle point to be made here, which comes down to double counting.  The addition rule: Pr(A union B) = Pr(A)+Pr(B)-Pr(A intersection B) allows us to work out the probability that either event A or event B happens: i.e., it tells us for any two events A and B, what is the probabilit...

There is a subtle point to be made here, which comes down to double counting. 

The addition rule:

Pr(A union B) = Pr(A)+Pr(B)-Pr(A intersection B)

allows us to work out the probability that either event A or event B happens: i.e., it tells us for any two events A and B, what is the probability that one of them occurs. 

However, this probability is affected by the relationship between the two events themselves. In particular, it matters whether the events are mutually exclusive or not.

Consider the following example:

A class of 20 students contains 12 boys and 8 pupils with blonde hair. What is the probability that a student is either a boy or has blonde hair?

Let event A be that a student is chosen with blonde hair and let event B be that a boy is chosen. Thus we are trying to find Pr(A union B) - what is the probability of event A or B occuring? The natural response is to think it is simply Pr(A) + Pr(B), in this case 8/20+12/20 =20/20=1

However, this is only true if there are no boys with blonde hair. Suppose instead that there are 2 boys with blonde hair in the class. Now the probability of choosing a student that is either a boy or blonde has fallen, since of the 8 remaining girls in the class, 2 do not have blonde hair. So we must calculate:

Pr(A union B) = Pr(A)+Pr(B)-Pr(A intersection B)

Here, Pr(A intersection B) is the probability that a student is a blonde boy, which is 2/20. Therefore, our new probability is:

Pr(A union B)=8/20+12/20-2/20=18/20

If we did not subtract the term at the end, we would be double counting the blonde haired boys firstly as boys and then as students with blonde hair, fogetting that they are one and the same individual in 2 cases. 

To make this point another way, consider a Venn diagram. With two mutually exclusive events, two circles in the Venn diagram do not overlap. With non-mutually excusive events, the circles do overlap. The overlap is the intersection, calculated here as 2/20. If we do not subtract this intersection from Pr(A) +Pr(B), we double count it, giving us the wrong probability of both events happening.

see more

1 year ago

289 views
Send a message

All contact details will be kept confidential.

To give you a few options, we can ask three similar tutors to get in touch. More info.

Contact Lewis

Still comparing tutors?

How do we connect with a tutor?

Where are they based?

How much does tuition cost?

How do tutorials work?

Cookies:

We use cookies to improve our service. By continuing to use this website, we'll assume that you're OK with this. Dismiss

mtw:mercury1:status:ok