Katy W. Uni Admissions Test -Personal Statements- tutor, IB Biology t...

Katy W.

Currently unavailable: until 09/01/2017

Degree: Veterinary Medicine (BVetMed) (Bachelors) - Royal Veterinary College University

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About me

Hi there!

I’m Katy and I am currently studying Veterinary Medicine in the lovely and vibrant city of London. Aside from the academics, I train and compete as part of the rowing team on a regular basis and also really enjoy cooking in my spare time - Spag Bol is my speciality!

I have tutored for a few years now, both in Science and English at my previous school and am very excited to be a part of this online community. I have always really enjoyed sharing my knowledge and instilling a greater understanding and appreciation for Biology, Chemistry and English.

What subjects do I offer?

- Biology 13+

- Biology GCSE

- Biology IB

- Chemistry 13+

- English Language GCSE

- English Literature GCSE

- Personal Statements/Uni Admissions for Veterinary Medicine

What will the sessions be like?

I think it is important that tutoring is never just a one-way experience, I strive to make the sessions interactive, dynamic and fun – lots can be achieved in an hour if it is enjoyable!

In any subject, having a solid basic understanding is integral to being able to develop a detailed and comprehensive understanding of the wider picture. I will focus on the areas that you would like help with, building from the basics upwards, working at your pace and to your level so that you can become more confident with the subject and gradually feel more at ease with trickier exam questions.

I aim to instill this confidence during the sessions, enabling you to piece concepts and ideas together while maintaining a really positive learning environment. 

I also think it is vital that your learning style is catered for, everyone learns differently so I am always on the go to change up the way the session will run, no matter if that’s with diagrams, analogies, talking things through, using practise questions etc. 

Applying to Vet school?

I have been through the veterinary school application process and am very aware of the challenges that the whole journey brings. I am happy to offer you help with whatever stage of the application you are at, whether that be achieving the entry requirements, touching up the personal statement or practising for the interview process.

What next?

If you would like to get in touch, please feel free to send me a message.

I look forward to hearing from you :)

Subjects offered

SubjectLevelMy prices
Biology GCSE £18 /hr
English Language GCSE £18 /hr
English Literature GCSE £18 /hr
Biology IB £20 /hr
-Personal Statements- Mentoring £20 /hr

Qualifications

QualificationLevelGrade
Biology HLBaccalaureate6
Chemistry HLBaccalaureate5
Latin HLBaccalaureate7
Maths SLBaccalaureate4
English SLBaccalaureate6
Psychology SLBaccalaureate6
Disclosure and Barring Service

CRB/DBS Standard

02/03/2015

CRB/DBS Enhanced

No

Currently unavailable: until

09/01/2017

General Availability

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Please get in touch for more detailed availability

Questions Katy has answered

How does evolution occur by natural selection?

Over time many theories have been put forward by the scientific community about how the process of evolution occurs. However the most commonly accepted theory amongst scientists is thatevolution occurs by the process of natural selection. This was put forward by Charles Darwin. He proposed tha...

Over time many theories have been put forward by the scientific community about how the process of evolution occurs. However the most commonly accepted theory amongst scientists is that evolution occurs by the process of natural selection. This was put forward by Charles Darwin. He proposed that:

There is naturally occurring variation in any given population - this is due to the variety in alleles which give rise to a variety of phenotypes (observable characteristics).

Those individuals who are better adapted for their environment as a result of the alleles they posess are more likely to survive and reproduce successfully.

Hence their offspring will inherit these alleles and so will also be more likely than others in the population to survive and reproduce etc due to the inheritance of these advantageous traits

Over a long period of time as the process of natural selection continues, there is a gradual change in the characteristics of a population by which members become better adapted for the environment in which they live. This is evolution by natural selection

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1 year ago

336 views

How should I structure an essay?

The first and most important thing that you should do before even beginning your essay is to take a moment to do a quick plan.  This should briefly outline the main strcuture of your essay, the key points you want to make, any quotes and themes etc and the order you'd like to set your ideas o...

The first and most important thing that you should do before even beginning your essay is to take a moment to do a quick plan. 

This should briefly outline the main strcuture of your essay, the key points you want to make, any quotes and themes etc and the order you'd like to set your ideas out in. This should help you to keep your essay focused, enabling you to include all the points that you intend to and will hopefully prevent you from venturing off topic. 

Here is an example of how you might set out an essay. Of course everyone has their own style of writing but these are probably the key bases to hit in order to create a strong foundation for any essay:

1. Introduction: This should be concise and focused on the essay question, it should give some context about the text(s) in question, such as a brief description of the setting or an outline of the characters in question, for example. You may also want to briefly state where you are heading in your essay and the main things that will cover. This shouldn't take you long and should only be a few sentences in length. 

2. Main Body - Set this out as a series of paragraphs, each following the PEE structure: 

Point - state what this parapgraph will demonstrate and be careful not to story tell. 

Evidence - the points you are making should always be backed up with evidence from the text. Try to include a fair number but not to the point of overload. If you are making lots of points without evidence or giving lots of quotes without making a point then the examiner may question your understanding of the text, and we don't want that. If you can't remember a quote for every point, then don't worry, you can always brielfy desrcibe the moment instead. 

Explanation - After making your point and providing some evidence, you must then explain the effect of the evidence that you have quoted. Try and critically analyse it. These questions may help: What does it show? Does it particularly emphasise something in the scene? Does it emphasise a major theme of the text? What effect does it have on the reader? Are there any literary devices that are being used that may aid the point the author is making?

At the end of each parapgraph, try and remember to link it back to the main essay question. Again this will prevent you from going off topic, keeping your analysis focused and will show the reader that you have really considered the essay question. 

3. Conclusion - An essay without a conclusion is like a story without an ending. Like the introduction it needn't be too long and the use of quotes is not generally encouraged. Simply outline the main things you have discussed, drawing back on the key points that you have made in the main body, and then link them back to the overall question. This should show that you have carefully considered the question throughout your essay and have been critical in your analysis. :)

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1 year ago

294 views

What is non-disjunction? How can this lead to changes in chromosome number?

Non-disjunction is the failure of chromosome pairs to separate properly during meiosis. This failure of separation usually occurs either in meiosis I (in anaphase I) or in meiosis II (in anaphase II).  The consequence of non-disjunction is the production of gametes that have incorrect numbers...

Non-disjunction is the failure of chromosome pairs to separate properly during meiosis. This failure of separation usually occurs either in meiosis I (in anaphase I) or in meiosis II (in anaphase II). 

The consequence of non-disjunction is the production of gametes that have incorrect numbers of chromosomes, either with too few or too many.

Those gametes with too few chromosomes usually perish quickly. Those with an extra chromsome can survive. 

Down's syndrome is an example of a condition that is the result of non-dysjunction. In Down's syndrome chrosmomes fail to separate leading to the presence of three chromsomes of type 21 instead of two. A person with this condition will therefore have a total number of 47 chromosomes instead of 46. Down's syndrome can be diagnosed by karyotyping the person's set of chromosomes and identifying the presence of three chromosomes of type 21. 

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1 year ago

368 views
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