Cordelia W. A Level Maths tutor, A Level Further Mathematics  tutor, ...

Cordelia W.

Currently unavailable: for regular students

Degree: Mathematical Science (Masters) - Durham University

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About me

I LOVE maths and believe I can pass on my love of the subject.

I have been teaching maths and physics for years. I taught myself maths and physics, I helped my friends understand both subjects, I went on to teach a whole secondary school class and have delivered one-to-one tutoring for the past five years.

My passion is mathematics, it's for this reason that I like teaching it. Nothing's better than helping others discover how wonderful and important it is. And while exams are important, there is real beauty and a rich history to be found if you know where to look (and I do). Mathematics is perhaps one of the only subjects with a whole culture surrounding it. While I am immersed in the subject, I understand others find it less attractive. Exploring its history and place in culture aids understanding of its mechanics and the tricks which help demystify it. Removing the fear helps people appreciate the subject as a whole, So let me share my love and knowledge of a subject which I fully intend to spend the rest of my life tackling.

Subjects offered

SubjectLevelMy prices
Further Mathematics A Level £20 /hr
Maths A Level £20 /hr
Physics A Level £20 /hr
Maths GCSE £18 /hr
Physics GCSE £18 /hr

Qualifications

QualificationLevelGrade
MathsA-LevelA*
Further MathsA-LevelA
PhysicsA-LevelA
GeographyA-LevelA
ChemistryA-LevelB
Disclosure and Barring Service

CRB/DBS Standard

No

CRB/DBS Enhanced

02/12/2014

Currently unavailable: for regular students

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Ratings and reviews

4.2from 5 customer reviews

Viktoriya (Student) February 28 2016

An excellent tutor who puts a lot of effort into explaining various methods of solving questions. She helped to improve from a low D to a high B in C4 just within one month time. (overall she helped me to get an A in the end n math). She is also very patient and does not give up. Her methods of explanation are very clear. She also encouraged me to keep working in every tutorial even when I wanted to give up. I recommended her to a friend of mine and she also saw great results within just a month. (She improved from a high C to a low A in AS further math).

Damien (Student) September 21 2016

i think i enjoyed it thankyou

Charles (Parent) February 7 2016

Brilliant, helpful and daughter was happy.

Ashwini (Parent) November 8 2016

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Questions Cordelia has answered

How do I expand out a pair of brackets?

Expanding something out like (x+2)(x+3) crops up everywhere in maths. Therefore it's a very important skill to develop. There are many different ways of looking at it - smily faces, rainbows, claws - to name a few, and everyone has their favourite. However, all of them essential boil down to ...

Expanding something out like (x+2)(x+3) crops up everywhere in maths. Therefore it's a very important skill to develop.

There are many different ways of looking at it - smily faces, rainbows, claws - to name a few, and everyone has their favourite. However, all of them essential boil down to multipling everything in the first bracket with everything in the second bracket. 

A good first way to look at it is to expand the first bracket to begin with. Taking our example at the top, we get (x+2)(x+3) = x(x+3) + 2(x+3). 

We can then expand these as individual brackets: x2 + 3x + 2x + 6.

Finally, we can collect like terms to simplify: x2 + 5x + 6

And we're done. With practise, this becomes one of those things you do so often, you almost stop thinking about it. Until someone asks you what your favourite method is and then the arguments begin...

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1 year ago

319 views

How do I simplify surds?

Easy! We first consider which number is in the square root. Then we look at it's factors: - if any of factors are square we can immediately take their root out of the overall square root. Once all the square factors have been removed, we're as simple as we can get. - if not, then there's not...

Easy! We first consider which number is in the square root. Then we look at it's factors:

- if any of factors are square we can immediately take their root out of the overall square root. Once all the square factors have been removed, we're as simple as we can get.

- if not, then there's not much to do as we're already simplified!

This is important as we can only add or subtract surds if they have the same number in the square root. Often we have to simplify the root before we can simplify larger, more complicated expressions.

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1 year ago

339 views

How do stars like ours form and die?

Stars are born when gases at high pressure and temperatures begin to burn. They start life out as a big cloud of space junk and debris. Slowly, there's a bit of the cloud with more stuff in it than the other bits so it has a bit more gravitational pull and so slowly, the rest of the cloud gets...

Stars are born when gases at high pressure and temperatures begin to burn. They start life out as a big cloud of space junk and debris. Slowly, there's a bit of the cloud with more stuff in it than the other bits so it has a bit more gravitational pull and so slowly, the rest of the cloud gets pulled towards that general area.

But as more of the gas collects there, then there are even more gravitational forces acting so pressure increases and more elements continue to get pulled in. Pressure rises causes the temperature to rise and, once it's hot enough, hydrogen undergoes a nuclear fusion to form helium. This releases energy making it hotter and increases pressure. It also starts a chain reaction so more fusion occurs.

The star can then settle down to a long stable slog with gravity pulling things in balancing with the fusion pressure pushing things out. So there's not much growth and not much really happens. The star is known as a main sequence star. This is the stage our sun is at.

Eventually, however, all good things come to an end and there's no more hydrogen left. So fusion starts to happen with larger elements like helium. Stars like ours expand to become red dwarfs and become hotter. When our sun does this, it will expand to destroy the Earth.

When all the nuclear reactions are done, there's no outward pressure keeping the star big so gravity causes it to collapse into itself forming a white dwarf. Also, no reactions mean no energy so things begin to cool off a bit. And that’s that. Over billions of years, our sun has gone from a cloud to the sun we know and love and will eventually expand to destroy our planet before falling into itself and turning cold. 

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1 year ago

283 views
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