Beth B.

Beth B.

£30 - £32 /hr

English Literature (Bachelors) - Durham University

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9 completed lessons

About me

At school I adored English and the creativity involved. It's not like Maths or Science where there is a wrong answer! You can interpret a text however you like, as long as you can provide a convincing argument using evidence. I liked analysing literature to figure out its deeper meanings and to think about what message the writer might have wanted to communicate to us.

 

Being passionate about English I want to help others to develop analytical and essay writing skills, as well as reading skills and spelling, punctuation and grammar. I want to inspire students, to make learning enjoyable through a range of teaching activities and to boost each student's confidence.

 

I studied English Literature at A-Level, achieving an A* and winning the school's annual English Literature prize. I then pursued an English Literature undergraduate degree at Durham University and achieved First Class Honours. I also studied a Masters in Gender Studies at UCL, which enabled me to study literature further.

 

I taught English to foreign students aged 10-17 on three summer camps. This allowed me to develop my teaching skills and I also gained a lot of experience in lesson planning. During sixth form I also mentored younger students in English Literature.

 

I hope that my energy, enthusiasm and chatty personality will make each lesson enjoyable.

At school I adored English and the creativity involved. It's not like Maths or Science where there is a wrong answer! You can interpret a text however you like, as long as you can provide a convincing argument using evidence. I liked analysing literature to figure out its deeper meanings and to think about what message the writer might have wanted to communicate to us.

 

Being passionate about English I want to help others to develop analytical and essay writing skills, as well as reading skills and spelling, punctuation and grammar. I want to inspire students, to make learning enjoyable through a range of teaching activities and to boost each student's confidence.

 

I studied English Literature at A-Level, achieving an A* and winning the school's annual English Literature prize. I then pursued an English Literature undergraduate degree at Durham University and achieved First Class Honours. I also studied a Masters in Gender Studies at UCL, which enabled me to study literature further.

 

I taught English to foreign students aged 10-17 on three summer camps. This allowed me to develop my teaching skills and I also gained a lot of experience in lesson planning. During sixth form I also mentored younger students in English Literature.

 

I hope that my energy, enthusiasm and chatty personality will make each lesson enjoyable.

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About my sessions

I aim to make each lesson engaging and exciting by providing students with a range of activities. I initially begin with a starter to inspire the student and to encourage their creative thinking in preparation for the lesson ahead. The final five minutes will be spent recapping on the lesson and noting any further concerns to address in the next session.


I am keen to focus on what each student is most concerned about and therefore allow them to dictate the content of the lessons. I therefore require work or issues to be sent to me before the lesson so that I can make sure that I am prepared to focus on the student's concerns and that the lesson is tailored fully to each student's needs. 


I want every student to be fully involved in their lesson and so, rather than an hour of me dictating, I aim to allow each student to have the opportunity to express their ideas and by working together we can inspire each other when analysing texts. I want our ideas to bounce off one another!


I treat each student individually and teach each lesson at the pace appropriate for them.

I aim to make each lesson engaging and exciting by providing students with a range of activities. I initially begin with a starter to inspire the student and to encourage their creative thinking in preparation for the lesson ahead. The final five minutes will be spent recapping on the lesson and noting any further concerns to address in the next session.


I am keen to focus on what each student is most concerned about and therefore allow them to dictate the content of the lessons. I therefore require work or issues to be sent to me before the lesson so that I can make sure that I am prepared to focus on the student's concerns and that the lesson is tailored fully to each student's needs. 


I want every student to be fully involved in their lesson and so, rather than an hour of me dictating, I aim to allow each student to have the opportunity to express their ideas and by working together we can inspire each other when analysing texts. I want our ideas to bounce off one another!


I treat each student individually and teach each lesson at the pace appropriate for them.

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Personally interviewed by MyTutor

We only take tutor applications from candidates who are studying at the UK’s leading universities. Candidates who fulfil our grade criteria then pass to the interview stage, where a member of the MyTutor team will personally assess them for subject knowledge, communication skills and general tutoring approach. About 1 in 7 becomes a tutor on our site.

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Ratings & Reviews

5
3 reviews
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1
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AN

Amaan Student

11 Mar

Really great help in preparation for exams!

AN

Amaan Student

28 Feb

very helpful.

SB

Sariana Student

Yesterday

Qualifications

SubjectQualificationGrade
Gender, Society and RepresentationDegree (Masters)MERIT
English LiteratureA-level (A2)A*
BiologyA-level (A2)A*
HistoryA-level (A2)A*
Fine ArtA-level (AS)A
Graduate Diploma in LawOtherDISTINCTION

General Availability

MonTueWedThuFriSatSun
Pre 12pm
12 - 5pm
After 5pm

Pre 12pm

12 - 5pm

After 5pm
Mon
Tue
Wed
Thu
Fri
Sat
Sun

Subjects offered

SubjectQualificationPrice
EnglishA Level£32 /hr
English LiteratureA Level£32 /hr
EnglishGCSE£30 /hr
English LiteratureGCSE£30 /hr

Questions Beth has answered

How should I structure a GCSE style English Literature essay?

Let us use the exam question 'How far does Bronte present Jane Eyre as evil in the red room scene?' as an example to help guide us through the structure of a good essay. You need to first start with an introduction and this is really important because it is the first thing your examiner will read, so you need to grab their attention and create a good first impression! The introduction should be no more than five or so lines. Firstly, pick out the key word in the question and define what it means in your own words. Here, the key word is 'evil' and you could describe it as meaning immoral, wicked and monstrous. You then need to directly address the question and answer it in a short and snappy sentence, for example 'Whilst Bronte does present Jane Eyre as evil to some extent, she also presents her as a victim and simultaneously a strong woman in the red room scene'. This shows the examiner that you know what the question is asking you and it helps to keep you on the right track. You then need to summarise the main points of your essay, so you might say 'Bronte presents Jane Eyre as evil by using imagery connecting her to hell and the devil'. You will then expand on this point in the main body of your essay. You could also include some background knowledge of the wider discussion of the question topic. So, if the topic is that Jane Eyre is evil, you could discuss the fact that 'Jane Eyre' is considered to be an early feminist novel and so rather than evil, Jane is a strong-willed and courageous woman ahead of her time. Whilst she could be thought evil, as she is portrayed throughout the novel as out of control and high spirited, Bronte actually intended her personality to suggest that she goes beyond her designated female role in Victorian society. Bronte also wants Jane to be portrayed as a victim early on in the novel so that we view her as a Victorian heroine by the end as she independently survives various hardships. The main body of the essay should discuss the three or four points you have referred to in your introduction. Within each point you should express both sides of the argument. So, if your first point is that Jane is presented as evil, you could present a counter-argument that she is also presented as angelic. Your points should therefore consist of your argument and counter-argument and for both you should follow the PEEL structure. This is point, evidence, explain and link. You should start the paragraph with a sentence about the point you are going to make, for example, 'Bronte presents Jane Eyre as evil by relating her to the devil and hell, but she also could be viewed as portraying her as an angel'. Then evidence should be found in the text to support it. You should explain and fully analyse the evidence and how it helps you answer the question. You then do the same for the counter-argument. The end of the paragraph should then summarise why your argument trumps the counter-argument, for example 'whilst Bronte does present angelic imagery this is always followed by devilish imagery suggests all Jane's evil overpowers her good'. Alternatively, you could conclude with a sentence on why you think Bronte is presenting both good and evil simultaneously. You should then link this directly back to the question of 'how far' Jane is presented as evil. When you're responding to a text you can look at the form, so the text type that the writer uses such as a novel. You can also refer to the structure such as how the plot is ordered and the sentence lengths. You can also refer to language and the words used and what impact they have and how they make the reader feel.Your conclusion should mirror your introduction. It should summarise what your essay has said. It should also answer the question in one clear and concise sentence. It should only be kept to around five lines.Let us use the exam question 'How far does Bronte present Jane Eyre as evil in the red room scene?' as an example to help guide us through the structure of a good essay. You need to first start with an introduction and this is really important because it is the first thing your examiner will read, so you need to grab their attention and create a good first impression! The introduction should be no more than five or so lines. Firstly, pick out the key word in the question and define what it means in your own words. Here, the key word is 'evil' and you could describe it as meaning immoral, wicked and monstrous. You then need to directly address the question and answer it in a short and snappy sentence, for example 'Whilst Bronte does present Jane Eyre as evil to some extent, she also presents her as a victim and simultaneously a strong woman in the red room scene'. This shows the examiner that you know what the question is asking you and it helps to keep you on the right track. You then need to summarise the main points of your essay, so you might say 'Bronte presents Jane Eyre as evil by using imagery connecting her to hell and the devil'. You will then expand on this point in the main body of your essay. You could also include some background knowledge of the wider discussion of the question topic. So, if the topic is that Jane Eyre is evil, you could discuss the fact that 'Jane Eyre' is considered to be an early feminist novel and so rather than evil, Jane is a strong-willed and courageous woman ahead of her time. Whilst she could be thought evil, as she is portrayed throughout the novel as out of control and high spirited, Bronte actually intended her personality to suggest that she goes beyond her designated female role in Victorian society. Bronte also wants Jane to be portrayed as a victim early on in the novel so that we view her as a Victorian heroine by the end as she independently survives various hardships. The main body of the essay should discuss the three or four points you have referred to in your introduction. Within each point you should express both sides of the argument. So, if your first point is that Jane is presented as evil, you could present a counter-argument that she is also presented as angelic. Your points should therefore consist of your argument and counter-argument and for both you should follow the PEEL structure. This is point, evidence, explain and link. You should start the paragraph with a sentence about the point you are going to make, for example, 'Bronte presents Jane Eyre as evil by relating her to the devil and hell, but she also could be viewed as portraying her as an angel'. Then evidence should be found in the text to support it. You should explain and fully analyse the evidence and how it helps you answer the question. You then do the same for the counter-argument. The end of the paragraph should then summarise why your argument trumps the counter-argument, for example 'whilst Bronte does present angelic imagery this is always followed by devilish imagery suggests all Jane's evil overpowers her good'. Alternatively, you could conclude with a sentence on why you think Bronte is presenting both good and evil simultaneously. You should then link this directly back to the question of 'how far' Jane is presented as evil. When you're responding to a text you can look at the form, so the text type that the writer uses such as a novel. You can also refer to the structure such as how the plot is ordered and the sentence lengths. You can also refer to language and the words used and what impact they have and how they make the reader feel.Your conclusion should mirror your introduction. It should summarise what your essay has said. It should also answer the question in one clear and concise sentence. It should only be kept to around five lines.

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2 months ago

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