Gusta M. A Level Classical Civilisation tutor, A Level English Litera...
£18 - £25 /hr

Gusta M.

Degree: English Literature (Bachelors) - Kings, London University

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About me

Hi, I'm Gusta and I'm a 21 year old English student from London.

Unsurprisingly, I love books! Whether it is reading them, discussing them or writing about them, it is unusual for me to find something that I dislike or don't want to finish reading. I hate being without something to read, and always have a book with me in case of emergency!

Although I am new to the world of online tutoring, I have several years experience working as a tutor for a range of subjects, from year six Maths, 13+ Latin to GCSE and A level English. I also have a lot of experience when it comes to applying to university and writing the dreaded personal statement, so I can help with that too!

I don't like to approach a new tutoring job with too much structure; everyone is different and learns in different ways so part of my job is to find a way that works best for you. Goal setting is really important; if you tell me where you want to be in two months time, I like to set points along the way so that you can see for yourself how you are progressing.

English is my first love when it comes to studying, but I also enjoy Classics, and completed the first year of a Classics degree at Oxford, so I can help with preparation for the entrance tests and interviews as I am very familiar with the process. If you're struggling to make up your mind about what you want to do, DON'T PANIC! I spent a year at university before I made up my mind, so I know how daunting the decision making progress can be.

What next?

If you have any questions, please do get in contact with me using the form below or book a free 15 minute 'Meet the Tutor' session and I will be happy to help you. 

Looking forward to meeting you soon! 

Gusta

Subjects offered

SubjectLevelMy prices
Classical Civilisation A Level £20 /hr
English Literature A Level £20 /hr
Latin A Level £20 /hr
English Language GCSE £18 /hr
English Literature GCSE £18 /hr
History GCSE £18 /hr
History GCSE £18 /hr
Latin GCSE £18 /hr
English 11 Plus £18 /hr
Maths 11 Plus £18 /hr
-Personal Statements- Mentoring £20 /hr
.ELAT Uni Admissions Test £25 /hr

Qualifications

QualificationLevelGrade
English LiteratureA-LevelA*
LatinA-LevelA
HistoryA-LevelA
Disclosure and Barring Service

CRB/DBS Standard

No

CRB/DBS Enhanced

18/12/2015

Ratings and reviews

5from 1 customer review

Mathew (Parent) May 11 2016

Very good session

Questions Gusta has answered

How do I scan hexameter?

Latin poems are written in a number of forms. Epic, such as Ovid's metamorphoses or Virgil's Aeneid, are written in hexameter.  When scanning, there are a couple of important terms you need to know: A syllable is a vowel or a dipthong. It is one sound, that often has consonants on either side...

Latin poems are written in a number of forms. Epic, such as Ovid's metamorphoses or Virgil's Aeneid, are written in hexameter. 

When scanning, there are a couple of important terms you need to know:

syllable is a vowel or a dipthong. It is one sound, that often has consonants on either side of it. 

foot is made up of several syllables, and in hexameter there will be six of these in a line. 

dactyl is the basic form of a foot. It consists of one long and two short syllables, and is shown like this - u u and sounds like dum di di

spondee is a long foot. It consists of two long syllables and is marked up like this - - and sounds dum dum

caesura is a break in the line. It must come at the end of a word, and commonly is found in the third foot, sometimes in the fourth and occasionally elsewhere in the line. It is marked //

Elision is when the vowel or sometimes a dipthong is not pronounced at the end of a word. When this happens, it is not counted for the purpose of scansion. 

The final two feet of hexameter will always be a dactyl followed by a spondee, so the lines will be like this:

- u u | - u u | - u u | - u u | - u u | - x

Or: - - | - - | - - | - - | - u u | - x

So, let's think about this in terms of some actual Latin. If we take the opening line of the Aeneid as an example:

arma virumque cano, Troiae qui primus ab ori

I sing of arms and the man, who first, from the shores of Troy....

The first thing to do is count the syllables in the line. In this line, there are 15 syllables. We know that the final two feet have to be - u u | - x, so that takes away five syllables, leaving us with ten syllables to divide between four feet. There are then some rules we need to apply to work out the rest. 

A vowel followed by two consonants is long. This means that the second syllable of virumque and the final syllable of cano are both long, so the scansion is like this:

 x x x - x x - x x x | - u u | - x 

Dipthongs are long. This means that the final syllable of Troiae is long, so we can then get to this:

 x x x - x x - x - x | - u u | - x 

The accusative is a short syllable, so the final a in arma is short, so the line is like this:

x u x - x x - x x x | - u u | - x 

 With these bits of information, we can then make the rest of the line fit in and work out where the feet go. 

The caesura falls on the comma, neatly spitting the line in two. 

So, the line scans thus: 

- u u | - u u | - // - | - - | - u u | - x

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1 year ago

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How should I begin to approach a practical criticism?

First, you should always begin with a brief summary of what the text is about. You need to show that you have understood the text. As you do this, think about what the text is doing; is it satirical, portraying a power struggle between two people etc.? This is how you write your introduction. ...

First, you should always begin with a brief summary of what the text is about. You need to show that you have understood the text. As you do this, think about what the text is doing; is it satirical, portraying a power struggle between two people etc.? This is how you write your introduction. Then, for the rest of the essay, you demonstrate how this is shown in the text with detailed ananlysis and precise examples. You should think about language (words chosen), form (what the text is) and structure (where things happen). There is no need to write a conclusion. 

Whilst writing, you should aim to use technical language and terminology; the more precise you are the more you will be able to say. 

The most important thing to remember is that it isn't enough just to spot the features of the text; you have to comment on the effect that each one has and why the writer has chosen to use it i.e. why it is there. 

Take time over it, go through the poem carefully, look for clear examples and go from there. Ask yourself questions as you are going through, such as:

Do the words have any particular connotations?

What is the relative length of each line?

What tenses has the writer used?

Is there any figurative language?

These can be applied to any practical criticism, whether it is prose, poetry or drama, and will make sure that you think about structure, language and form when writing your answer. 

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1 year ago

723 views
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