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About me

Recent graduate with lots of experience. Excellent credentials. Fun too!

About Me: 

Recently, I graduated from the University of York with first-class honours in philosophy. I came third in my year overall, and while I was there I edited an international undergraduate journal. I've had a number of my own papers published in other journals (I've posted links to some below), and last April I was selected to present my work at a philosophy conference in Reading. Next year I am due to start an MA, for which I have been awarded a full scholarship.

Why Me:

- I am an experienced tutor. I previously taught at an academy and have been teaching privately for a number of years.

- I genuinely find the subjects I teach interesting (or I wouldn't teach them!) Chances are I can make them more interesting for you, too. (Do you want to know what Bertrand Russell's nickname was...?)

- I am reliable, thorough and dedicated. I work hard to prepare classes that will help you achieve your aims, and, as long as you are willing to work hard too, I guarantee you'll see improvement.

- I have excellent credentials (see below).

Qualifications:

- First-class honours degree in Philosophy (I came third overall in my year).

- I have several papers published in international journals (links below).

- I have previously been selected to present my work at academic conferences.

- Whilst at university, I was an editor for Dialectic, an international undergraduate philosophy journal.

Further Things:

A common problem with teaching philosophy, particularly at A-Level, is the lack of teachers who really know what they're talking about (a lot of 'philosophy' teachers are in fact theologians). This causes difficulties for two reasons: 1) Philosophy is hard, and if the teacher isn't perfectly clear on the topic himself, the student is facing an uphill battle; 2) When you aren't familiar and comfortable with the subject matter, it's very difficult to make it accessible and engaging. Philosophy is wonderful. It challenges our most everyday and common-held beliefs and assumptions, and a good philosophical theory, even if it's completely wrong, should be a pleasure to explore because of the possibilities it opens. BUT, and I speak from experience, badly taught philosophy is as dry as fossils, left baking in the Saharan sun for several hundred millennia. 

You will not have this problem with me.

Final word goes to Bertrand Russell:

'The value of philosophy is, in fact, to be sought largely in its very uncertainty. The man who has no tincture of philosophy goes through life imprisoned in the prejudices derived from common sense, from the habitual beliefs of his age or his nation, and from convictions which have grown up in his mind without the co-operation or consent of his deliberate reason. To such a man the world tends to become definite, finite, obvious; common objects rouse no questions, and unfamiliar possibilities are contemptuously rejected.

'As soon as we begin to philosophize, on the contrary, we find…that even the most everyday things lead to problems to which only very incomplete answers can be given. Philosophy, though unable to tell us with certainty what is the true answer to the doubts which it raises, is able to suggest many possibilities which enlarge our thoughts and free them from the tyranny of custom. Thus, while diminishing our feeling of certainty as to what things are, it greatly increases our knowledge as to what they may be; it removes the somewhat arrogant dogmatism of those who have never travelled into the region of liberating doubt, and it keeps alive our sense of wonder by showing familiar things in an unfamiliar aspect.' 

Academic Papers:

http://punzel.org/Ephemeris2015/Davis.pdf

http://www.freshphilosophy.com/journal/should-moral-realists-also-be-moral-fictionalists-by-daniel-james-davis-university-of-york

Subjects offered

SubjectLevelMy prices
Philosophy A Level £30 /hr
Philosophy and Ethics A Level £30 /hr
English Literature GCSE £30 /hr
History GCSE £30 /hr
Philosophy GCSE £30 /hr
Philosophy and Ethics GCSE £30 /hr
Philosophy IB £30 /hr
-Personal Statements- Mentoring £30 /hr

Qualifications

QualificationLevelGrade
PhilosophyBachelors DegreeFirst-class
HistoryA-LevelA
English LiteratureA-LevelB
PhilosophyA-LevelA
Disclosure and Barring Service

CRB/DBS Standard

15/09/2016

CRB/DBS Enhanced

No

Ratings and reviews

5from 2 customer reviews

Laurence (Student) October 13 2016

Laurence (Student) October 11 2016

Questions Daniel has answered

How can I improve my philosophical essay writing?

One thing to remember when writing philosophical essays is that it is very important to be as clear as possible. Let's face it, philosophy is difficult, full of categorical imperatives and hard problems of consciousness. To compensate, make your language as clear as possible. If you can descri...

One thing to remember when writing philosophical essays is that it is very important to be as clear as possible. Let's face it, philosophy is difficult, full of categorical imperatives and hard problems of consciousness. To compensate, make your language as clear as possible. If you can describe a complicated idea or concept with simple language, then whoever is marking your essay will be able to see that you GET it. Of course, sometimes technical words are called for, like a posteriori, a priori, ceteris paribus, syllogism, tautology, non sequitur, etc. But use these with care and only when appropriate. Employing selected philosophical terms well will impress the examiner, using them incorrectly will make them sigh. In general though, keep to Orwell's maxims and make your essays clear and crisp.

see more

1 year ago

237 views

How can I improve my philosophical essay writing?

One thing to remember when writing philosophical essays is that it is very important to be as clear as possible. Let's face it, philosophy is difficult, full of categorical imperatives and hard problems of consciousness. To compensate, make your language as clear as possible. If you can descri...

One thing to remember when writing philosophical essays is that it is very important to be as clear as possible. Let's face it, philosophy is difficult, full of categorical imperatives and hard problems of consciousness. To compensate, make your language as clear as possible. If you can describe a complicated idea or concept with simple language, then whoever is marking your essay will be able to see that you GET it. Of course, sometimes technical words are called for, like a posteriori, a priori, ceteris paribus, syllogism, tautology, non sequitur, etc. But use these with care and only when appropriate. Employing selected philosophical terms well will impress the examiner, using them incorrectly will make them sigh. In general though, keep to Orwell's maxims and make your essays clear and crisp.

see more

1 year ago

308 views
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