Cora B.

Cora B.

£18 - £25 /hr

Russian and History (Bachelors) - University College London University

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About me

I am a recent graduate of UCL, currently taking a year out to travel and save up for a Masters. I am a friendly and outgoing person, with a love of teaching. History is a diverse and constantly evolving subject, providing one with endless material to study. Through school, I studied a range of periods, from Elizabeth I to the rise of Hitler, as such I have a wide range of academic knowledge in the GCSE and A Level curriculums. At university, I specialised in medieval Russian history, and gained a first class mark in my dissertation, high enough for it to be deemed a publishable study. History is a subject I genuinely love studying and one I believe can teach many useful transferable skills. I also undertook the challenge of learning Russian from beginners level, reaching A Level standard within my first year alone. Consequently, I am able to sympathise with the challenges of learning Russian, particularly its complicated grammar system. In school, I excelled in my GCSEs and A Levels, yet only through hard work and productive revision; I am able to help with revision methods and how to answer exam questions correctly. Coursework also formed part of these qualifications, and I am confident in writing pieces that fulfil the top band of marking criteria.Outside of my studies, I have always loved acting and have taken part in over 15 productions. I am also a keen traveller and have just returned from the Balkans where I volunteered with a small refugee charity.


I am a recent graduate of UCL, currently taking a year out to travel and save up for a Masters. I am a friendly and outgoing person, with a love of teaching. History is a diverse and constantly evolving subject, providing one with endless material to study. Through school, I studied a range of periods, from Elizabeth I to the rise of Hitler, as such I have a wide range of academic knowledge in the GCSE and A Level curriculums. At university, I specialised in medieval Russian history, and gained a first class mark in my dissertation, high enough for it to be deemed a publishable study. History is a subject I genuinely love studying and one I believe can teach many useful transferable skills. I also undertook the challenge of learning Russian from beginners level, reaching A Level standard within my first year alone. Consequently, I am able to sympathise with the challenges of learning Russian, particularly its complicated grammar system. In school, I excelled in my GCSEs and A Levels, yet only through hard work and productive revision; I am able to help with revision methods and how to answer exam questions correctly. Coursework also formed part of these qualifications, and I am confident in writing pieces that fulfil the top band of marking criteria.Outside of my studies, I have always loved acting and have taken part in over 15 productions. I am also a keen traveller and have just returned from the Balkans where I volunteered with a small refugee charity.


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About my sessions

When tutoring, the most important thing for me is constant feedback and interaction with the student. This ensures that students get the most out of the lesson whilst allowing the tutor to assess whether the student is understanding concepts and absorbing them. I can help students achieve their goals in providing tutorials specialised for each individual student, focusing on their needs and constantly encouraging feedback from them. This is important in encouraging learning through making sure the student feels engaged in the lesson and that their needs are being addressed. It is also important to discover what interests each student about their subject and try to build on that; learning is much easier if the student can be genuinely interested in the subject matter. When first introduced to a student, after establishing the syllabus and topic to be tutored, I first ask them to identify what the main problems they feel they are having with the subject. Each lesson will begin with introducing the topic that I will address, in order to make sure the student has a clear aim for the lesson and knows what is going to be covered. This will then be followed by a short tutorial through the subject matter followed by activities in order for the student to utilise what they have just learnt and to highlight any problems. The lesson ends with talking through problems and a final activity.

When tutoring, the most important thing for me is constant feedback and interaction with the student. This ensures that students get the most out of the lesson whilst allowing the tutor to assess whether the student is understanding concepts and absorbing them. I can help students achieve their goals in providing tutorials specialised for each individual student, focusing on their needs and constantly encouraging feedback from them. This is important in encouraging learning through making sure the student feels engaged in the lesson and that their needs are being addressed. It is also important to discover what interests each student about their subject and try to build on that; learning is much easier if the student can be genuinely interested in the subject matter. When first introduced to a student, after establishing the syllabus and topic to be tutored, I first ask them to identify what the main problems they feel they are having with the subject. Each lesson will begin with introducing the topic that I will address, in order to make sure the student has a clear aim for the lesson and knows what is going to be covered. This will then be followed by a short tutorial through the subject matter followed by activities in order for the student to utilise what they have just learnt and to highlight any problems. The lesson ends with talking through problems and a final activity.

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Personally interviewed by MyTutor

We only take tutor applications from candidates who are studying at the UK’s leading universities. Candidates who fulfil our grade criteria then pass to the interview stage, where a member of the MyTutor team will personally assess them for subject knowledge, communication skills and general tutoring approach. About 1 in 7 becomes a tutor on our site.

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Qualifications

SubjectQualificationGrade
ChemistryA-level (A2)A
English LiteratureA-level (A2)A
HistoryA-level (A2)A
BiologyA-level (AS)A

General Availability

MonTueWedThuFriSatSun
Pre 12pm
12 - 5pm
After 5pm

Pre 12pm

12 - 5pm

After 5pm
Mon
Tue
Wed
Thu
Fri
Sat
Sun

Subjects offered

SubjectQualificationPrices
HistoryA Level£20 /hr
RussianA Level£20 /hr
English LiteratureGCSE£18 /hr
HistoryGCSE£18 /hr
RussianGCSE£18 /hr
HistoryUniversity£25 /hr

Questions Cora has answered

How do I use and form the Accusative Case in singular?

The Accusative case is used the modify the noun that is the subject of the verb. For instance, in the sentence, 'I saw a book'. 'book' is the noun that will be modified. In the masculine and neuter case, the noun will only change in the accusative case if it is an animate; a living thing. Feminine nouns will always change in the accusative case, whether they are inanimate or animate.Masculine Nouns:1. If the noun in inanimate, there is no change.2. If noun is animate and ends in a consonant, add “а”.3. If noun is animate, replace “й”, with “я”.4. If noun is animate, replace “ь”, with “я”.Feminine Nouns:1. Replace “а” with “у”.2. Replace “я” with “ю”.3. Does not change if a soft sign.Neuter Nouns:1. Inanimate nouns do not change (almost all neuter nouns are inanimate)The Accusative case is used the modify the noun that is the subject of the verb. For instance, in the sentence, 'I saw a book'. 'book' is the noun that will be modified. In the masculine and neuter case, the noun will only change in the accusative case if it is an animate; a living thing. Feminine nouns will always change in the accusative case, whether they are inanimate or animate.Masculine Nouns:1. If the noun in inanimate, there is no change.2. If noun is animate and ends in a consonant, add “а”.3. If noun is animate, replace “й”, with “я”.4. If noun is animate, replace “ь”, with “я”.Feminine Nouns:1. Replace “а” with “у”.2. Replace “я” with “ю”.3. Does not change if a soft sign.Neuter Nouns:1. Inanimate nouns do not change (almost all neuter nouns are inanimate)

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2 weeks ago

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What was the most significant factor in the causation of the October 1917 Russian Revolution?

Firstly, we need to decide what the main factors were. They can be defined as the failure of the Provisional Government, the role of Lenin and the Bolsheviks and WW1. Ultimately, Lenin and the Bolsheviks carried out the revolution and as such we can argue that they were the most significant factor. Indeed, they carried it out alone, inciting many historians to label it a coup instead of a revolution. However, they wouldn't have been able to do so without the weakness of the Provisional Government and WW1. The Provisional Government did not have the people's support and indeed, during the Kornilov Affair had armed Bolshevik prisoners in order to defend the city. Thus they were a weak opponent for the Bolsheviks to face. However, arguably WW1 was more significant. Germany ensured Lenin's safe crossing to Russia in the hope that Russia would pull out of the war following the political chaos that they hoped would be enacted by Lenin. Moreover, Lenin gained supporters through his promise of peace and as such, arguably WW1 was the most significant factor in causing the revolution. The coup like nature of the revolution suggests that a people's uprising was not inevitable in October, thus in Germany sending over Lenin as a result of WW1, the war must be considered the most important factor.Firstly, we need to decide what the main factors were. They can be defined as the failure of the Provisional Government, the role of Lenin and the Bolsheviks and WW1. Ultimately, Lenin and the Bolsheviks carried out the revolution and as such we can argue that they were the most significant factor. Indeed, they carried it out alone, inciting many historians to label it a coup instead of a revolution. However, they wouldn't have been able to do so without the weakness of the Provisional Government and WW1. The Provisional Government did not have the people's support and indeed, during the Kornilov Affair had armed Bolshevik prisoners in order to defend the city. Thus they were a weak opponent for the Bolsheviks to face. However, arguably WW1 was more significant. Germany ensured Lenin's safe crossing to Russia in the hope that Russia would pull out of the war following the political chaos that they hoped would be enacted by Lenin. Moreover, Lenin gained supporters through his promise of peace and as such, arguably WW1 was the most significant factor in causing the revolution. The coup like nature of the revolution suggests that a people's uprising was not inevitable in October, thus in Germany sending over Lenin as a result of WW1, the war must be considered the most important factor.

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3 weeks ago

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