Lauren C. GCSE English and World Literature tutor, A Level English an...

Lauren C.

£20 - £22 /hr

Currently unavailable: for new students

Studying: Spanish & English Literature (Bachelors) - Cardiff University

4.9
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17 reviews| 30 completed tutorials

Contact Lauren

About me

I study English Literature and Spanish at Cardiff University, and last year I lived in Mexico teaching English as a second language. 

I'm incredibly enthusiastic about both English Literature and Spanish, and want to pass that enthusiasm onto my tutees.

During my year in Mexico I had several private tutees and I worked as an au pair in Spain over summer too, helping teach English to the family's children. The age range of my students is very wide and I have lots of experience with GCSE and A Level students in particular. 

I study English Literature and Spanish at Cardiff University, and last year I lived in Mexico teaching English as a second language. 

I'm incredibly enthusiastic about both English Literature and Spanish, and want to pass that enthusiasm onto my tutees.

During my year in Mexico I had several private tutees and I worked as an au pair in Spain over summer too, helping teach English to the family's children. The age range of my students is very wide and I have lots of experience with GCSE and A Level students in particular. 

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Ratings & Reviews

4.9from 17 customer reviews
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Ghanim (Parent)

July 20 2016

It was a great session.

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Lok Yee (Student)

May 2 2016

I like the way she explains the answers and questions carefully

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Caroline (Parent)

May 2 2016

great very helpful for me

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Kassie (Parent)

May 2 2016

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Qualifications

SubjectQualificationGrade
SpanishDegree (Bachelors)1st
English LiteratureDegree (Bachelors)1st
PsychologyA-level (A2)A*
Applied Business StudiesA-level (A2)A*

General Availability

Before 12pm12pm - 5pmAfter 5pm
mondays
tuesdays
wednesdays
thursdays
fridays
saturdays
sundays

Subjects offered

SubjectQualificationPrices
EnglishA Level£22 /hr
English LiteratureA Level£22 /hr
English and World LiteratureA Level£22 /hr
SpanishA Level£22 /hr
EnglishGCSE£20 /hr
English LiteratureGCSE£20 /hr
English and World LiteratureGCSE£20 /hr
SpanishGCSE£20 /hr

Questions Lauren has answered

How do I write a good paragraph?

Good paragraphs come in all shapes and sizes, although this doesn't necessarily help you to prepare effectively for an exam, so a little extra guidance may be needed. Here's a good basic guide to writing a solid paragraph: 

Firstly, every good paragraph starts with a topic sentence. This should be snappy, clear and most importantly, concisely sum up what you will discuss in the paragraph that's about to follow. 

This should preferably be followed by some supporting evidence - either from a critic or from the text itself. 

You can then go on to analyse in detail this quote, always referring back to your topic sentence to indicate that you have a good grasp on your argument, 

The final sentence of the paragraph should sum up what you wrote about. 

The best way to think about writing a paragraph is that it should follow the same basic structure as an essay. Each paragraph is just a mini essay! 

Good paragraphs come in all shapes and sizes, although this doesn't necessarily help you to prepare effectively for an exam, so a little extra guidance may be needed. Here's a good basic guide to writing a solid paragraph: 

Firstly, every good paragraph starts with a topic sentence. This should be snappy, clear and most importantly, concisely sum up what you will discuss in the paragraph that's about to follow. 

This should preferably be followed by some supporting evidence - either from a critic or from the text itself. 

You can then go on to analyse in detail this quote, always referring back to your topic sentence to indicate that you have a good grasp on your argument, 

The final sentence of the paragraph should sum up what you wrote about. 

The best way to think about writing a paragraph is that it should follow the same basic structure as an essay. Each paragraph is just a mini essay! 

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2 years ago

671 views

How do you create commands (imperatives) in Spanish?

There are two basic forms of imperatives, negative imperatives and positive imperatives, and these can be divided into informal (tú) and formal commands (ustedes/ vosotros).

Let's start with the positive imperatives in the informal 'tú' form. These are the easiest, as you just take the 3rd person form of the verb in the indicative. For example, hablar (to speak) becomes habla! (speak!). Comer (to eat) becomes come! (eat!). Some of the irregulars in this form of the imperative are decir (di), salir (sal), poner (pon), and tener (ten). 

Negative, informal imperatives become subjunctive. Don't speak would become No hables. Don't eat would become No comas. 

The subjunctive is also used for both sets of formal commands, positive or negative. Hablar is either hable! or no hablen! and comer becomes coma! or no coman!

That means you must know the subjunctive well to deal with commands, because all the irregulars stay the same, like ir would be no vayas! in the negative informal imperative.  

There are two basic forms of imperatives, negative imperatives and positive imperatives, and these can be divided into informal (tú) and formal commands (ustedes/ vosotros).

Let's start with the positive imperatives in the informal 'tú' form. These are the easiest, as you just take the 3rd person form of the verb in the indicative. For example, hablar (to speak) becomes habla! (speak!). Comer (to eat) becomes come! (eat!). Some of the irregulars in this form of the imperative are decir (di), salir (sal), poner (pon), and tener (ten). 

Negative, informal imperatives become subjunctive. Don't speak would become No hables. Don't eat would become No comas. 

The subjunctive is also used for both sets of formal commands, positive or negative. Hablar is either hable! or no hablen! and comer becomes coma! or no coman!

That means you must know the subjunctive well to deal with commands, because all the irregulars stay the same, like ir would be no vayas! in the negative informal imperative.  

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2 years ago

766 views

What's the best way to revise for my exam?

I always found that the best way to revise, above anything else, was making sure I knew exactly what was going on in the text I was studying. You can do this by re-reading the text and by checking SparkNotes to ensure you understand everything that's going on. Perhaps make flashcards to summarise important plot points and have someone test you on them in preparation. 

Next, you need to identify the main characters. Writing notes about their role in the text and the connections they have with other characters and events is a great way of doing this. If you learn visually, you could even create a powerpoint and use pictures from the internet to help.

Then, you must identify the key themes. For example, death, love, power. It really depends on the text, but you should try and write down even the obvious ones, as they will probably be important. 

Once you have the notes prepared about the characters and themes, you can add some important quotes to match with each one. This way, whatever comes up in the exam, you have supporting evidence prepared. 

Finally, if you have access to past papers, try and plan answers to the questions that have come up previously, using all your knowledge from the revision notes you've already made. This will help you to perfect your timings for the actual exam, and get you thinking about the text you're studying. 

I always found that the best way to revise, above anything else, was making sure I knew exactly what was going on in the text I was studying. You can do this by re-reading the text and by checking SparkNotes to ensure you understand everything that's going on. Perhaps make flashcards to summarise important plot points and have someone test you on them in preparation. 

Next, you need to identify the main characters. Writing notes about their role in the text and the connections they have with other characters and events is a great way of doing this. If you learn visually, you could even create a powerpoint and use pictures from the internet to help.

Then, you must identify the key themes. For example, death, love, power. It really depends on the text, but you should try and write down even the obvious ones, as they will probably be important. 

Once you have the notes prepared about the characters and themes, you can add some important quotes to match with each one. This way, whatever comes up in the exam, you have supporting evidence prepared. 

Finally, if you have access to past papers, try and plan answers to the questions that have come up previously, using all your knowledge from the revision notes you've already made. This will help you to perfect your timings for the actual exam, and get you thinking about the text you're studying. 

Show more

2 years ago

1062 views

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