Dominique L. Mentoring -Personal Statements- tutor, GCSE English Lang...

Dominique L.

Currently unavailable: for regular students

Degree: Philosophy (Bachelors) - Nottingham University

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About me

Hi there, my name is Dominique and I am currently a Philosophy student at the University of Nottingham.

Having tutored Global Perspectives, IGCSE History, and Second Langauge English in the past, I have experience with humanity subjects, and am used to accomodating my tutoring style for the wide range of abilities of different pupils.

I am passionate, not only about the subjects I have chosen to tutor, but about education in general, and my aim is to get my students as excited about learning as I am. I find that once that excitement is unlocked, the top grades that everyone aims for come a lot more naturally.

I aim to tutor in a way that is accessible and interactive and that makes learning fun. Whether it is explaining particular concepts, going over essays that have already been written, or just general support on class material, I am prepared to do my utmost to help overcome any bumps in the road.

Feel free to contact me with questions or concerns at anytime.

Subjects offered

SubjectLevelMy prices
English Language GCSE £18 /hr
History GCSE £18 /hr
Spanish GCSE £18 /hr
-Personal Statements- Mentoring £20 /hr

Qualifications

QualificationLevelGrade
English LiteratureA-LevelA*
HistoryA-LevelA*
English LanguageA-LevelA
SpanishA-LevelA
Disclosure and Barring Service

CRB/DBS Standard

No

CRB/DBS Enhanced

No

Currently unavailable: for regular students

Questions Dominique has answered

How can I write a personal statement that stands out?

Given the amount of personal statements admissions officers have to sift through, the desire to write one that is striking is definitely something that you should be prioritizing. Luckily, its not as difficult as it may seem. Firstly, I would say never underestimate the power of your opening a...

Given the amount of personal statements admissions officers have to sift through, the desire to write one that is striking is definitely something that you should be prioritizing. Luckily, its not as difficult as it may seem.

Firstly, I would say never underestimate the power of your opening and closing sentences. Generally, those are what stick in a readers mind. I would suggest starting with something that is almost shocking, something entirely unexpected. For example, I once proof read a personal statement that began with the sentence "I know nothing."
An ending, should be equally powerful, but the aim should be to deliver a final punch about how much you want what the univeristy has to offer.

Secondly, I would advise you to avoid writing a personal statement that begins to resemble a list of your acheivements. State what you have acheieved or participated in, but then make it more relevant by relating it back to the degree you want to study, or demonstrate how this proves that you have something to offer.

As an example, compare these two; which would you feel more partial to as an admissions officer?

"I participated in an international session of the European Youth Parliament."

OR

"My participation in an international session of the European Youth Parliament proves my interest in the issues plaguing the world around me. It demonstrates how I am aware of the responsibility that comes with my education, and that I am prepared to use the knowledge I will acquire to improve the world around me."

Remember you are selling yourself. Write thinking not about what the university can offer you, but what you can offer it.

Lastly, I think passion is essential. You need to show that you are motivated and eager and prepared to work. Relate your passion for your chosen subject to the outside world. Make them believe that by accepting you, they are taking on a budding superstar in whatever field you may be trying to enter.

I am happy to read over your personal statement and make suggestions, help with cutting down characters, or answer any further questions.

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1 year ago

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How do I form the preterite tense in Spanish?

For verbs ending in -ar the following endings should be added to the stem of the verb (a practical example is provided in the brackets): -é (hablé) -aste (hablaste) -ó (habló). -amos (hablamos). -asteis (hablasteis). -aron (hablaron). -er and -ir verbs have the same endings, which are as follo...

For verbs ending in -ar the following endings should be added to the stem of the verb (a practical example is provided in the brackets):

-é (hablé)
-aste (hablaste)
-ó (habló).
-amos (hablamos).
-asteis (hablasteis).
-aron (hablaron).

-er and -ir verbs have the same endings, which are as follows:

-í (viví).
-iste (viviste).
-ió (viv).
-imos (vivimos).
-isteis (vivisteis).
-ieron (vivieron).

The Preterite Tense is generally used in 6 different situations which are listed below.

1) When talking about actions that occured at a fixed point in time.
Eg. I ate at 6.30.

2) When referring to actions that occured a specific number of times.
Eg. I called you 3 times.

3) When talking about things that happened in an enclosed period of time.
Eg. He went on holiday for 2 months.

4) Actions that are part of a chain of events.
Eg. I ate breakfast, packed my bag, and went to school.

5) When describing sudden changes in sentiment or opinion.
Eg. In that moment, I was extremely angry.

6) Used in phrases that pin point a particular time. Key words to look out for are "yesterday," "last night," "afterwards," "last year," "the other day," etc...

[The verbs in italics are the ones that would be in the preterite tense if the sentence was in Spanish. I just thought that it would be easier to understand the context in which they are used if you could see it in English].


I would be happy to look at practise examples in Spanish and tell you if you are on the right track.

This tense also has a lot of irregular verbs, which I suggest you memorize as soon as possible as they don't follow a specific rule in their irregularity.

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1 year ago

295 views

How should I go about a descriptive writing task?

To an extent, descriptive writing is one of those things that can't be taught. Having said that however, there are a few things that you can do to help greatly improve your writing. One good technique is to focus on the five senses, and to base your description around them. For instance, if ...

To an extent, descriptive writing is one of those things that can't be taught. Having said that however, there are a few things that you can do to help greatly improve your writing.

One good technique is to focus on the five senses, and to base your description around them.

For instance, if the question asks you to describe a forest, it is quite effective to talk about what you see, smell, hear, see, feel and taste. For example, the squishy and yielding soil beneath your feet, the smell of mildew and dampness, the sight of soft green light filtering through interlocking branches of trees.

It can also sometimes be extremely effective if you use the senses unconventionally.
For example, "I could taste the anger of the sky." Obviously, anger can't be tasted, but this shows a high level of creativity.

Also, don't underestimate the power of similes, metaphors, personification and sound devices. 

"The tree was old, and bent with rough textured bark" is no where near as effective as "The tree leaned forward like a stooped old man with wrinkled skin trying to tell me a secret."

The two images are roughly the same, but there is a huge difference in how powerful they are.

Laslty, I would say its very important to avoid cliches. An examiner marks hundreds, if not thousands of essays, and eventually he will get sick of something being described as being "as red as blood" or "as orange as a sunset"  Try and use fresh and original imagery and comparisons. "Red as crushed strawberries" is a lot more striking, or "the orange of egg yolks."

Try and be creative. This piece of writing is one of the few areas where you have some artistic license, so take full advantage of it.

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1 year ago

293 views
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