Ronni B. Uni Admissions Test French tutor, A Level French tutor, GCSE...

Ronni B.

Currently unavailable: for new students

Degree: French and Italian (Bachelors) - Oxford, Pembroke College University

Contact Ronni
Send a message

All contact details will be kept confidential.

To give you a few options, we can ask three similar tutors to get in touch. More info.

Contact Ronni

About me

Who am I?
 
Hi! I'm Ronni and I'm a third year French and Italian student at Pembroke College, Oxford University. I spent my gap year in Paris and am about to move to Rome for my year abroad! In international terms, I score C1s in both languages.

What can I help you with?

Language learning can be so rewarding when you're taught by someone who is passionate about the language and wants to pass that on to you. The best part of 1:1 teaching is that we can concentrate on what you would like to cover - and cover them in the way that best suits your learning style. As a non-native speaker, I've probably experienced and overcome the very same difficulties you'll come up against, plus I've learnt the language in the same way you are coming to it, rather than being blessed with a bilingual childhood! 

I'm also available to tutor literature (and film), which makes up over half of my degree and was the reason I chose to go to Oxford! The basics of lterature analysis are the same whether the texts are in English, Italian or French but a good tutor imparts an enjoyment of the subject on top of the core skills.

Overall, I aim to set you up with greater language confidence and analysis skills, working over any issues you have, which are just that much harder to address when a teacher has a full classroom.

What do we do now?
If you'd like to set up a free 'meet the tutor' session, we can get to know each other a little and work out how I can best help you.

I look forward to hearing from you soon,
Ronni
 

Subjects offered

SubjectLevelMy prices
Extended Project Qualification A Level £20 /hr
French A Level £20 /hr
English Language GCSE £18 /hr
English Literature GCSE £18 /hr
French GCSE £18 /hr
History GCSE £18 /hr
Italian GCSE £18 /hr

Qualifications

QualificationLevelGrade
FrenchA-LevelA
LatinA-LevelA
History (Early Modern)A-LevelA
Extended ProjectA-LevelA*
Disclosure and Barring Service

CRB/DBS Standard

No

CRB/DBS Enhanced

No

Currently unavailable: for new students

General Availability

Weeks availability
MonTueWedThuFriSatSun
Weeks availability
Before 12pm12pm - 5pmAfter 5pm
MONDAYMONDAY
TUESDAYTUESDAY
WEDNESDAYWEDNESDAY
THURSDAYTHURSDAY
FRIDAYFRIDAY
SATURDAYSATURDAY
SUNDAYSUNDAY

Please get in touch for more detailed availability

Ratings and reviews

5from 5 customer reviews

Archie (Student) August 13 2016

Very helpful. Thank you

Pierre (Student) January 2 2016

Very knowledgable about adding things which would help boost your grades in essays. Highly Recommended.

Subhaan (Student) September 15 2016

James (Parent) August 23 2016

See all reviews

Questions Ronni has answered

How do I form the conditional past (conditionnel passé)?

If you know how to form the passé composé and how to form the conditional, then you're only one step away from knowing how to form the conditional past. I'm going to start with je mange and explain how to form the conditional past with it. Step 1) What auxiliary verb does it take? manger take...

If you know how to form the passé composé and how to form the conditional, then you're only one step away from knowing how to form the conditional past.

I'm going to start with je mange and explain how to form the conditional past with it.

Step 1) What auxiliary verb does it take?
manger takes avoir in the passé composé
the same rule applies if the verb in question takes être as an auxiliary in the passé composé
Step 2) Conjugate this into the conditional mood
for the singular first person, avoir becomes aurais
Step 3) Add the past participle of your verb
the past participle of manger is mangé
if your verb uses être, the past participle follows the same gender & quantity agreement rules as in the passé composé
Step 4) Put together the subject pronoun, the auxiliary verb (in the conditional) and the past participle:
j' + aurais + mangé

Subject pronoun + avoir/être in the conditional mood + past participle (with être agreement if necessary)

And you're done!

see more

12 months ago

374 views

What are 'si' clauses?

'Si' clauses are sometimes known as conditionals. They're used to introduce a hypothetical action which is based on another action. For example,s'il fait beau, je sors -if it is sunny, I go out. Here, the going out is dependent on the weather being nice. There are three types of 'si' clauses:...

'Si' clauses are sometimes known as conditionals. They're used to introduce a hypothetical action which is based on another action. For example, s'il fait beau, je sors - if it is sunny, I go out. Here, the going out is dependent on the weather being nice.

There are three types of 'si' clauses:

1) Potentiel - in these, the second action could happen.
- present + present
S'il fait beau, je sors - If it is sunny, I go out.
- present + future
S'il fait beau, je sortirai - If it is sunny, I will go out.
- present + imperative
S'il fait beau, sors - If it is sunny, go out!
- passé composé + present/future/imperative
Si tu l'as vu, tu dois me dire - If you have seen it, you must tell me
Si tu l'as vu, tu devras me dire plus tard - If you have seen it, you will have to tell me later
Si tu l'as vu, dites-moi! - If you have seen it, tell me!

2) Iréel du présent - in these, the second action is unlikely
- imperfect + conditional
S'il faisait beau, je sortirais - If it was sunny, I would go out

3) Iréel du passé - in these, the second action is now impossible, given the first didn't happen
- pluperfect + conditional past
S'il avait fait beau, je serais sortie - If it had been sunny, I would have gone out

And there you have it, 'si' clauses! Quick final note: the 'si' part does not need to be first in the sentence, just like in English - we say 'I would have gone out if it had been sunny' just as we say 'if it had been sunny, I would have gone out'. The verb that follows the 'si' stays in the same tense as above, just swap the two halves around!

see more

12 months ago

344 views
Send a message

All contact details will be kept confidential.

To give you a few options, we can ask three similar tutors to get in touch. More info.

Contact Ronni

Still comparing tutors?

How do we connect with a tutor?

Where are they based?

How much does tuition cost?

How do tutorials work?

Cookies:

We use cookies to improve our service. By continuing to use this website, we'll assume that you're OK with this. Dismiss

mtw:mercury1:status:ok