Tom W. A Level Maths tutor, GCSE Maths tutor, GCSE Physics tutor

Tom W.

Currently unavailable: until 28/05/2016

Degree: General Engineering (Masters) - Durham University

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About me

Hi, I’m Tom, an Engineering student studying at Durham University.  I’ve always enjoyed the logical world of Maths and Physics and I hope I can teach you what I have learnt along the way, to boost your understanding and make complicated ideas simple.

I’m very patient and understanding, so there is no such thing as a stupid question! I have experience in tutoring A-level maths students through volunteering with the University, so I already have an idea of the common areas people struggle with.

The Sessions:

Before you book any sessions, you can arrange a free ‘Meet the Tutor’ session where we can go over what you need help with and which exam board you are on. This means we can make the most of the sessions. You would be surprised how quickly an hour goes by when we have a clear goal.

As everyone is different, the sessions will be unique to match the individual’s needs whether if it’s exam technique, a specific area or the subject as a whole.

What Next?

If you have any queries feel free to send me an email or book a ‘Meet the Tutor’ session.

I’m available at the times shown below, but if you are after a single session I am flexible and will be able to work around your needs.
I look forward to getting in touch!

Subjects offered

SubjectLevelMy prices
Maths A Level £20 /hr
Maths GCSE £18 /hr
Physics GCSE £18 /hr

Qualifications

QualificationLevelGrade
MathsA-LevelA*
Further MathsA-LevelA
ChemistryA-LevelA
PhysicsA-LevelA
Disclosure and Barring Service

CRB/DBS Standard

No

CRB/DBS Enhanced

No

Currently unavailable: until

28/05/2016

Questions Tom has answered

How do you find the equation of a line at a given point that is tangent to a circle?

This question may start by giving you an equation, which you need to write in the form of the standard equation of a circle (usually by completing the square). This allows you to see the centre of the circle. As you now have two coordinates you can work out the gradient of the line between the...

This question may start by giving you an equation, which you need to write in the form of the standard equation of a circle (usually by completing the square). This allows you to see the centre of the circle. As you now have two coordinates you can work out the gradient of the line between the centre of the circle and the given point on the circumference. As this line is perpendicular to the tangent on the circle, the gradient is the negative reciprocal. Now you know the gradient of the tangent and a point it crosses through, you can find the equation of the line by substituting these values into the standard equation of a line y=mx+c

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11 months ago

281 views

What is the largest possible length of a pole you could fit in a room?

Lets say you are in a cubical grain silo, with a height of 12m, and a base with dimensions 3m by 4m. If you wanted to fit a pole in the silo, what is the largest possible length of the pole?  The length we are trying to find is the diagonal from one corner on the base, to the opposite corner ...

Lets say you are in a cubical grain silo, with a height of 12m, and a base with dimensions 3m by 4m. If you wanted to fit a pole in the silo, what is the largest possible length of the pole? 

The length we are trying to find is the diagonal from one corner on the base, to the opposite corner at the top of the silo.

This can be worked out using pythagoras (a2+b2=c2), as the height of the silo, the length we are trying to work out, and the diagonal between the opposite corners of the base form a right angled triangle.

This means the problem can be split up into to two steps.

Firstly the length of the diagonal on the base is the square root of (32+42) giving us 5m.

Then we can do the same method to find the length of the pole. The square root of (52+122) gives us 13m.

This means the largest possible pole you could fit in the silo is 13 meters.

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11 months ago

329 views

Why does your hair stand on end when you touch a Van de Graaff generator?

This is all down to static electricity. Inside the Van de Graaff generator, there is a rubber band and rollers. As they are electrically insulated, when the motor turns they rub together and electrons are 'knocked' off causing a positive charge.  In order to try and reach an equilibrium, elec...

This is all down to static electricity.

Inside the Van de Graaff generator, there is a rubber band and rollers. As they are electrically insulated, when the motor turns they rub together and electrons are 'knocked' off causing a positive charge. 

In order to try and reach an equilibrium, electrons from the dome (and anything touching it) move to the positively charged rubber band causing it to slowly gain a positive charge.

If you are also touching the dome, you will slowly become positively charged including each of your hairs. As like charges repel, and hair is very light, they will try and get as far away from each other as possible, causing them to stand up.

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11 months ago

927 views
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