PremiumSérina G. A Level English tutor, GCSE English Language tutor, GCSE En...

Sérina G.

Currently unavailable: for regular students

Degree: English and French (Bachelors) - Oxford, Exeter College University

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About me

About me

I'm a first year English and French student at Exeter College, Oxford. I have always been enthusiastic about teaching and have experience tutoring young people of all ages in the past, from 11+ tutoring for primary school children to helping students with their French A-Level.

About the sessions

For me, tutoring is a rewarding activity and a two-way street. Your interests and needs will guide the sessions, whether that is learning about a particular tense or preparing for an exam paper. But there is also more to education than just exams, and hopefully I can instill in you some of my passion for language and literature, helping you see reading and language study as a pleasure and something exciting.

Can you help me apply to Oxbridge?

Of course! I went through that process myself, and I know how difficult and stressful it can be, so I am more than happy to guide you through the application process and help make your application as strong as possible.

What next?

If you are interested in meeting, please send me a 'Webmail' or book a 'Meet the tutor session', both of which can be accessed from this website. Please remember to give me details about which exam board you are using and the areas in which you are struggling.

I look forward to meeting you!

Subjects offered

SubjectLevelMy prices
English A Level £24 /hr
English Language A Level £24 /hr
English Literature A Level £24 /hr
French A Level £24 /hr
History A Level £24 /hr
English GCSE £22 /hr
English Language GCSE £22 /hr
English Literature GCSE £22 /hr
French GCSE £22 /hr
History GCSE £22 /hr
-Personal Statements- Mentoring £24 /hr
.MLAT (Modern Languages) Uni Admissions Test £26 /hr

Qualifications

QualificationLevelGrade
EnglishA-LevelA*
FrenchA-LevelA*
HistoryA-LevelA*
Disclosure and Barring Service

CRB/DBS Standard

No

CRB/DBS Enhanced

No

Currently unavailable: for regular students

Ratings and reviews

5from 7 customer reviews

Najaah (Parent) February 21 2016

it was really helpful. she asked me what i would like help on, and gave me lots of concepts and techniques that i could talk about. she also helped me structure my essay, and made the session fun and engaging.

Osura (Student) April 29 2016

Ajit (Parent) April 1 2016

Aneesa (Parent) April 14 2016

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Questions Sérina has answered

How do I structure a good essay?

A good essay structure is essential for expressing your ideas clearly and showing the examiner that you know what you are talking about. Always make sure that your essay includes an introduction, a body and a conclusion. The introduction An introduction should rephrase or unpack the question,...

A good essay structure is essential for expressing your ideas clearly and showing the examiner that you know what you are talking about. Always make sure that your essay includes an introduction, a body and a conclusion.

The introduction

An introduction should rephrase or unpack the question, outlining what you are going to explore in your essay and explaining why this is significant. For instance, if your essay question is "How is power presented in King Lear?", you should outline the different forms of power present in the text (verbal, royal, physical, emotional) and their significance to the play overall.

The Body

The body of your essay should consist of continous and focused analysis. Each paragraph should have a theme or idea behind it, introduced with a topic sentence. You should then quote significant examples and explain how or why language is used, or the themes which are dislayed by it. Then analyse the effect of this, whether this is to make the audience sympathize, to make them laugh or purely to convey information. Make sure you address the question at all times.

The conclusion

A good conclusion is important to round off your essay. Even if you feel like you don't have time, always try to write a few sentences at the end, summarizing your argument and again exploring the significance and impact of what you have analysed.

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11 months ago

284 views

How do I use the imperfect in French?

In French, the imperfect is used to describe a scene (il FAISAIT beau), to say that you did something regularly in the past (je MANGEAIS un burger toutes les semaines) or to describe a continuous action in the past (je COURAIS très vite). It is formed by taking the nous form of the present, ta...

In French, the imperfect is used to describe a scene (il FAISAIT beau), to say that you did something regularly in the past (je MANGEAIS un burger toutes les semaines) or to describe a continuous action in the past (je COURAIS très vite).

It is formed by taking the nous form of the present, taking off the 'ons' and adding the endings (ais, ais, ait, ions, iez, aient). For example, if I want to say "you (plural) used to say", I would take the nous form of the present (nous disons), take off the ending and add iez. "Vous disiez". Et voilà!

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11 months ago

303 views

To what extent did the two world wars change the status of women in Britain?

This is a wide-ranging question and should be considered carefully. The words 'to what extent' mean that you need to explore both how the wars did AND how they did not change the status of women in Britain, before reaching a conclusion on how much the wars changed women's status. On one hand,...

This is a wide-ranging question and should be considered carefully. The words 'to what extent' mean that you need to explore both how the wars did AND how they did not change the status of women in Britain, before reaching a conclusion on how much the wars changed women's status.

On one hand, the wars did change the status of women in Britain. For the first time, women were actively encouraged to work, participating in the war effort on the home front since the majority of able-bodied men were away on the front lines. Women worked in factories, they kept businesses running and they proved that they could be as competent as men in helping society to function. They were also considered as British citizens who strongly aided in the war effort, not just as women who stayed at home. In this sense, the war helped women gain a higher status and responsibiltiy, contributing to the Representation of the People Act of 1918 which allowed women with sufficient property over the age of 30 to vote.

On the other hand, the world wars did not completely change the status of women. After the war, women were expected to go back to their household duties and their role as wives; it was still relatively rare for women to have a profession of their own. They were still not given full rights as citizens (it was only in 1928, many years after World War One, that all women over 21 were given the right to vote) and pay for the same jobs remained unequal. There were still stereotypes regarding standards of femininity, and there were still things women could not do as a result of their gender (for instance, education remained male-orientated and few women got a higher education).

Overall, the wars obviously did change the status of women, but it is up to you to consider how much you think they did and to find evidence to back up your point of view.

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11 months ago

335 views
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