Jacob C. A Level English tutor, GCSE Maths tutor, A Level Classical C...

Jacob C.

Currently unavailable: for regular students

Studying: History (MA hons) (Bachelors) - Edinburgh University

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1 review| 1 completed tutorial

Contact Jacob

About me

About Me

I'm a History student at Edinburgh University, as well as working as a freelance journalist for Edinburgh49.  I love weightlifting, cooking and knowledge of all sorts - when presented in the right way, any fact or concept can be exciting and interesting.

I've been tutoring young people between the ages of thirteen and eighteen since secondary school on a variety of subjects, from Alexander the Great to Aldous Huxley. I believe in patience, enthusiasm for my tutees' progress, and always giving a tutorial with a smile.

What tutees can expect

First and foremost, the sessions are purely about you. What challenges or grabs you will guide what you're taught. From specific classwork to broad skills for analysis or exam prep, the table is essentially yours for choosing what we cover. Even if you just need someone to mark and go through essay work, I can work with you on improving your grades no matter the scale.


And although the biggest priority in these sessions will be learning, enjoyment will be a close second. After all: what's the point in using your time to learn if it's not going to be fun and interesting?

Do you handle other academic matters? (i.e. personal statements, etc.)

In short, yes! Any kind of writing is fair game, and I've edited my fair share of personal statements, academic CV's and helped other students through the University application process.

So what now?

Get in touch! Book a "Meet the Tutor" session, or send me a webmail through this site. Before a meeting, have a think about what you're having trouble with, or what you want from a session. And remember - a microphone and webcam are also pretty good to have as well!

About Me

I'm a History student at Edinburgh University, as well as working as a freelance journalist for Edinburgh49.  I love weightlifting, cooking and knowledge of all sorts - when presented in the right way, any fact or concept can be exciting and interesting.

I've been tutoring young people between the ages of thirteen and eighteen since secondary school on a variety of subjects, from Alexander the Great to Aldous Huxley. I believe in patience, enthusiasm for my tutees' progress, and always giving a tutorial with a smile.

What tutees can expect

First and foremost, the sessions are purely about you. What challenges or grabs you will guide what you're taught. From specific classwork to broad skills for analysis or exam prep, the table is essentially yours for choosing what we cover. Even if you just need someone to mark and go through essay work, I can work with you on improving your grades no matter the scale.


And although the biggest priority in these sessions will be learning, enjoyment will be a close second. After all: what's the point in using your time to learn if it's not going to be fun and interesting?

Do you handle other academic matters? (i.e. personal statements, etc.)

In short, yes! Any kind of writing is fair game, and I've edited my fair share of personal statements, academic CV's and helped other students through the University application process.

So what now?

Get in touch! Book a "Meet the Tutor" session, or send me a webmail through this site. Before a meeting, have a think about what you're having trouble with, or what you want from a session. And remember - a microphone and webcam are also pretty good to have as well!

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Ratings & Reviews

5from 1 customer review
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Calvin (Parent)

February 22 2016

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Qualifications

SubjectQualificationGrade
English LanguageA-level (A2)A*
English LiteratureA-level (A2)A
Medieval HistoryA-level (A2)A*
ClassicsA-level (A2)A

Subjects offered

SubjectQualificationPrices
Classical CivilisationA Level£20 /hr
EnglishA Level£20 /hr
Classical CivilisationGCSE£18 /hr
EnglishGCSE£18 /hr
MathsGCSE£18 /hr

Questions Jacob has answered

How should I approach an essay question on Greek/ Roman Theatre?

First step: don't panic. You'll have studied the play or piece you've been given in class, so it's impossible you won't know at least something about it. The exam isn't expecting you to do anything innovative or hugely creative: you'll have likely gone over most of the main points you'll make in class.

Start out by identifying which play it is, and (if applicable) what section, if you're being asked to analyse a specific scene. What does the question ask you? For instance, if you're begin asked about the forms of comedy in Aristophanes' The Birds, then talking about its dramatic elements aren't going to help you much.

Once you've orientated yourself, start thinking. Why have they asked the question? What do you think the examiner wants you to explore? Don't be afraid to make a five/ten minute plan at the beginning of your answer, detailing your points, their evidence and how it relates to the question.

Remember, as historical documents as well as pieces of entertainment, Greco-Roman plays are hugely affected by what was then "current events". Use your wider knowledge of the ancient world to your advantage. What social commentary are these plays making? Why are certain scenes funny, or tragic, based on what happened outside of the theatre?

Try making each paragraph a self-encapsulated point, some evidence and a piece of analysis. This is a neat and simple way of illustrating your point. You may also want to leave space at the beginning and write your introduction last, just to make sure it matches your essay. There's nothing worse than losing marks because your introduction doesn't quite match up with your conclusion.

 

First step: don't panic. You'll have studied the play or piece you've been given in class, so it's impossible you won't know at least something about it. The exam isn't expecting you to do anything innovative or hugely creative: you'll have likely gone over most of the main points you'll make in class.

Start out by identifying which play it is, and (if applicable) what section, if you're being asked to analyse a specific scene. What does the question ask you? For instance, if you're begin asked about the forms of comedy in Aristophanes' The Birds, then talking about its dramatic elements aren't going to help you much.

Once you've orientated yourself, start thinking. Why have they asked the question? What do you think the examiner wants you to explore? Don't be afraid to make a five/ten minute plan at the beginning of your answer, detailing your points, their evidence and how it relates to the question.

Remember, as historical documents as well as pieces of entertainment, Greco-Roman plays are hugely affected by what was then "current events". Use your wider knowledge of the ancient world to your advantage. What social commentary are these plays making? Why are certain scenes funny, or tragic, based on what happened outside of the theatre?

Try making each paragraph a self-encapsulated point, some evidence and a piece of analysis. This is a neat and simple way of illustrating your point. You may also want to leave space at the beginning and write your introduction last, just to make sure it matches your essay. There's nothing worse than losing marks because your introduction doesn't quite match up with your conclusion.

 

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2 years ago

762 views

What are the main themes in "The Crucible" by Arthur Miller?

To begin with the obvious, much of 'The Crucible' revolves around the idea of secrets and lies - after all, it is Abigail Williams' lie to the town, and John Proctors lie to his wife which arguably leads to the tragedy in Salem. Every conversation in 'The Crucible' is laced with references to these hidden meanings and secrets rife in Salem. Think about your favourite parts of the work (if you have any, that is!) - what's going on below the surface? Are the characters telling the truth? If not, why not?

You could also think about how the play explores themes of individuality. Is there a reason why the story is set in a town of Puritans? What about the importance of John Millers name, or the loss of identity in mass hysteria? Read through the first act with this in mind, you'll be surprised how much you find.

And finally, think about the world in which the author lived - if you haven't already, look up "The McCarthy Witch Hunts" in particular. In what ways could you draw parallels between the 17th Century Arthur Miller imagined, and the 20th century he inhabited?

To begin with the obvious, much of 'The Crucible' revolves around the idea of secrets and lies - after all, it is Abigail Williams' lie to the town, and John Proctors lie to his wife which arguably leads to the tragedy in Salem. Every conversation in 'The Crucible' is laced with references to these hidden meanings and secrets rife in Salem. Think about your favourite parts of the work (if you have any, that is!) - what's going on below the surface? Are the characters telling the truth? If not, why not?

You could also think about how the play explores themes of individuality. Is there a reason why the story is set in a town of Puritans? What about the importance of John Millers name, or the loss of identity in mass hysteria? Read through the first act with this in mind, you'll be surprised how much you find.

And finally, think about the world in which the author lived - if you haven't already, look up "The McCarthy Witch Hunts" in particular. In what ways could you draw parallels between the 17th Century Arthur Miller imagined, and the 20th century he inhabited?

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2 years ago

970 views

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