Paige R. GCSE Classical Greek tutor, GCSE Latin tutor, A Level Classi...

Paige R.

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Classics and Ancient History (Masters) - Exeter University

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About me

I am a postgraduate student of Classics and Ancient History at the University of Exeter. In my teaching, I intend to inspire a lasting sense of awe about the ways in which antiquity has shaped our lives today. My focus is mainly on the classical languages as I have tutored students in these for over 4 years now, and I maintain that they provide a strong foundation for learning many other subjects, such as modern foreign languages.

I currently lead Latin workshops at a local secondary school, where interested students can voluntarily sign up to gain a qualification in the Latin language. These classes have been great fun, as I try to add as much variety and excitement as possible to ensure that they are truly memorable!

I also offer tutoring to university students who require additional help with either Greek or Latin. In these sessions, I regularly provide linguistic and grammar revision exercises to develop a sound and thorough understanding of the language. I also encourage my tutees to recap to me what has been covered in class, and in doing so, I am able to highlight and address any recurring difficulties or issues. My online tutor sessions will take a very similar approach, but I can of course tailor them to individual needs.

If you find yourself struggling, or even lacking motivation in learning either Latin or Greek, I am more than happy to help you and resolve any language-related problems you might have. I find that many students quickly dismiss Latin once they face a tricky grammatical obstacle, but I'd like to show that it's not as bad as you may think and that anyone is capable of learning the ancient languages!

If you'd like to get in touch, please send me a WebMail or book a Meet the Tutor Session.

I look forward to meeting you!

I am a postgraduate student of Classics and Ancient History at the University of Exeter. In my teaching, I intend to inspire a lasting sense of awe about the ways in which antiquity has shaped our lives today. My focus is mainly on the classical languages as I have tutored students in these for over 4 years now, and I maintain that they provide a strong foundation for learning many other subjects, such as modern foreign languages.

I currently lead Latin workshops at a local secondary school, where interested students can voluntarily sign up to gain a qualification in the Latin language. These classes have been great fun, as I try to add as much variety and excitement as possible to ensure that they are truly memorable!

I also offer tutoring to university students who require additional help with either Greek or Latin. In these sessions, I regularly provide linguistic and grammar revision exercises to develop a sound and thorough understanding of the language. I also encourage my tutees to recap to me what has been covered in class, and in doing so, I am able to highlight and address any recurring difficulties or issues. My online tutor sessions will take a very similar approach, but I can of course tailor them to individual needs.

If you find yourself struggling, or even lacking motivation in learning either Latin or Greek, I am more than happy to help you and resolve any language-related problems you might have. I find that many students quickly dismiss Latin once they face a tricky grammatical obstacle, but I'd like to show that it's not as bad as you may think and that anyone is capable of learning the ancient languages!

If you'd like to get in touch, please send me a WebMail or book a Meet the Tutor Session.

I look forward to meeting you!

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Personally interviewed by MyTutor

We only take tutor applications from candidates who are studying at the UK’s leading universities. Candidates who fulfil our grade criteria then pass to the interview stage, where a member of the MyTutor team will personally assess them for subject knowledge, communication skills and general tutoring approach. About 1 in 7 becomes a tutor on our site.

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15/10/2014

Qualifications

SubjectQualificationGrade
ClassicsDegree (Bachelors)2:1
Classical CivilisationA-level (A2)A
LatinA-level (A2)A
SpanishA-level (A2)B
DramaA-level (A2)B

Subjects offered

SubjectQualificationPrices
Classical CivilisationA Level£20 /hr
LatinA Level£20 /hr
Classical GreekGCSE£18 /hr
LatinGCSE£18 /hr

Questions Paige has answered

What is a purpose/final clause?

Constructions in Latin are not as terrifying as you may think; it's just a case of learning the grammatical rules for each construction and putting them into practice. 

A purpose clause indicates the reason for which a certain action was done. As with other constructions, the verb found in a purpose clause will always be subjunctive. If we were to use a purpose clause in English, the verb would be an infinitive (I went to the shops to buy some groceries). 

The Latin purpose clause will be made up of 'ut' (=in order to), or 'ne' (=in order to not) and the imperfect subjunctive (-rem, -res,-ret, -remus, -retis, -rent)

Consider the following example:

denique ego ad patrem redii ut rem explicarem.

Finally I returned (perfect, 1st person ending) to my father in order to explain the matter.

More literally: Finally I returned to my father so that I could explain the matter. 

If the purpose clause is negative (i.e. not to do something), we use the conjunction 'ne' instead of 'ut'. Consider the following example:

noctem exspectavimus ne ab hostibus videremur. 

We waited for night in order to not be seen by the enemy. 

Or, we waited for night so that we wouldn't be seen by the enemy.

(NB. the Latin word 'hostis' (enemy) is nearly always written in the plural form, so expect to find 'hostes' or 'hostibus' frequently)

So, to recap:

* A purpose clause is used to express a reason for why an action has been done;

* The imperfect subjunctive is always used (because the verb is still a possibility, it hasn't happened yet so we can't use an indicative verb);

* Purpose clauses are always made up of the conjunctions: 'ut' or 'ne', and the imperfect subjunctive;

* It's worth learning your verb endings of the imperfect subjunctive so that these constructions are easy to spot in unseen translations.

Constructions in Latin are not as terrifying as you may think; it's just a case of learning the grammatical rules for each construction and putting them into practice. 

A purpose clause indicates the reason for which a certain action was done. As with other constructions, the verb found in a purpose clause will always be subjunctive. If we were to use a purpose clause in English, the verb would be an infinitive (I went to the shops to buy some groceries). 

The Latin purpose clause will be made up of 'ut' (=in order to), or 'ne' (=in order to not) and the imperfect subjunctive (-rem, -res,-ret, -remus, -retis, -rent)

Consider the following example:

denique ego ad patrem redii ut rem explicarem.

Finally I returned (perfect, 1st person ending) to my father in order to explain the matter.

More literally: Finally I returned to my father so that I could explain the matter. 

If the purpose clause is negative (i.e. not to do something), we use the conjunction 'ne' instead of 'ut'. Consider the following example:

noctem exspectavimus ne ab hostibus videremur. 

We waited for night in order to not be seen by the enemy. 

Or, we waited for night so that we wouldn't be seen by the enemy.

(NB. the Latin word 'hostis' (enemy) is nearly always written in the plural form, so expect to find 'hostes' or 'hostibus' frequently)

So, to recap:

* A purpose clause is used to express a reason for why an action has been done;

* The imperfect subjunctive is always used (because the verb is still a possibility, it hasn't happened yet so we can't use an indicative verb);

* Purpose clauses are always made up of the conjunctions: 'ut' or 'ne', and the imperfect subjunctive;

* It's worth learning your verb endings of the imperfect subjunctive so that these constructions are easy to spot in unseen translations.

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2 years ago

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