Sebastian B. A Level Spanish tutor, GCSE Spanish tutor, IB Spanish tutor

Sebastian B.

Currently unavailable: for new students

Degree: German and Spanish (Bachelors) - Bristol University

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About me

About Me

¡Hola! I am a languages (Spanish and German) student at the University of Bristol. I absolutely love langauges because they allow you to communicate with new people, explore new places, access new ideas, and get a new perspective on the world. I hope to share this excitement with you!

I had the wonderful opportunity to spend my gap year in Spain, which has enabled me to speak Spanish fluently. During my time there, I stayed with a local family and went to school, allowing me a first-hand look into their school system and culture. I also got the opportunity to tutor English to non-native speakers.

Tutorial Sessions

I believe that a strong basic understanding of grammar is key to language learning. I therefore tend to focus more on grammar in lessons, and I emphasise the ability to apply grammatical knowledge in order to speak and write coherently. 

One of the great things about language is that grammatical structures don't depend on vocabulary, so we can talk about whatever you find interesting, making lessons more exciting! Of course, special time will also be spent making sure you understand vocabularly necessary for your exam.

I am to make my sessions enjoyable, and hopefully at the end of them, you will enjoy language-learning just as much as I do!

What now?
If you have any questions, send me a 'WebMail' or book a 'Meet the Tutor Session' (both accessible through this website). Please remember to tell me your exam board and what you find difficult!

¡Espero conocerte pronto! (I look forward to meeting you soon!)

Subjects offered

SubjectLevelMy prices
Spanish A Level £20 /hr
Spanish GCSE £18 /hr
Spanish IB £20 /hr

Qualifications

QualificationLevelGrade
SpanishA-LevelA*
English LiteratureA-LevelA
HistoryA-LevelA
Disclosure and Barring Service

CRB/DBS Standard

No

CRB/DBS Enhanced

No

Currently unavailable: for new students

Questions Sebastian has answered

What are the best ways to practise Spanish at home if no one speaks it?

In the modern era, there are more ways than ever to practise a language without knowing someone who speaks it. Obviously, if you do know someone, that'd be ideal, but until you meet a Spanish speaking friend, these are some good ways to practise: TV/Films. These are great for improving your v...

In the modern era, there are more ways than ever to practise a language without knowing someone who speaks it. Obviously, if you do know someone, that'd be ideal, but until you meet a Spanish speaking friend, these are some good ways to practise:

TV/Films. These are great for improving your vocabulary and auditory skills, and you can find these online on Netflix or buy them on DVD on Amazon. If you can't quite understand it all at first, put on the subtitles and see if you can identify which part of the subtitle goes with which word!

Songs. These are also great for vocabulary! One thing you can do is find the lyrics and see if you can translate them into English.

Books. Reading is by far the best way to improve your reading skills and written Spanish. The best thing to do is to find a book at an appropriate level and just read. Keep a dictionary on hand so you can look up words you don't know!

Talk to yourself. You may look a bit weird, but this is great for forcing your brain to process thoughts in Spanish, even if that's through translation. This will increase your fluency!

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11 months ago

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What is the difference between the simple past (preterite) and the imperfect tense?

Spanish, unlike English, has two different past tenses, the simple past, or preterite, and the imperfect. The two have different meanings and are conjugated differently. A verb in the simple past means that an action happened at a fixed period of time. The action is completed and it all happe...

Spanish, unlike English, has two different past tenses, the simple past, or preterite, and the imperfect. The two have different meanings and are conjugated differently.

A verb in the simple past means that an action happened at a fixed period of time. The action is completed and it all happened in the past. For example, "Yo fui al cine" (I went to the cinema) or "Él habló con Pablo ayer" (He spoke with Pablo yesterday). Generally, if you see expressions of time, such as "ayer", "la semana pasada", etc., the sentence will use a simple past.

A verb in the imperfect is something that happens in the past, not at any particular point in time, or habitually over time. Many times, this can be translated into English as "used to", but not always. This tense is used to set the scene and describe how something was. For example, "Cuando vivía, era profesor" (When he lived, he was a teacher) or "Mi madre siempre me decía que tenía que comer las verduras" (My mother always told me that I had to eat my vegetables).

Often times you will see the two past tenses in the same sentence. The imperfect will set the scene and the simple past will tell you what happens in that moment. This will happen a lot in stories. For example, "Mientras hablábamos sobre algo importante, mi hermano nos interrumpió" (While we were talking about something important, my brother interrupted us). The first verb is setting the scene generally, and the second one describes an action that happened right then and there and was completed. This sort of sentence is good for helping you remember the difference.

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11 months ago

295 views

When do I need to put an accent (pronunciation rules)?

Spanish is great because it is a language which is completely phonetic, which means it is read exactly how it is written and always follows certain rules. One of those rules is about stress. All multi-syllabic words have a stressed syllable, both in English and Spanish. In English for example,...

Spanish is great because it is a language which is completely phonetic, which means it is read exactly how it is written and always follows certain rules. One of those rules is about stress. All multi-syllabic words have a stressed syllable, both in English and Spanish. In English for example, SPANish, phoNEtic, comPLETEly, pronunciAtion. In English, it doesn't really matter where you put the stress; it just sounds a bit odd if you do it wrongly, but in Spanish it can change the meaning of a word.

In Spanish, there two main rules to stress. The first is that any word that ends in a vowel, n, or s will have the second to last syllable stressed: HAblo, caMINo, eXAmen.The other is that any word that ends in any consonant other than n or s is stressed on the last syllable: espaÑOL, verDAD.

The rule for accents is simple: anything that breaks the two big stress rules needs an accent. For example: liMÓN, piRÁmide, haBLÓ.

The other time you might use an accent is when distinguishing between two words that are spelled the same, like se and sé, este and éste, or que and qué. These differences need to be memorised, so keep a list and add any new ones!

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11 months ago

293 views
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