Rachael  O. Mentoring -Medical School Preparation- tutor, Mentoring -...

Rachael O.

Currently unavailable: for regular students

Degree: Medicine (Other) - Bristol University

Contact Rachael
Send a message

All contact details will be kept confidential.

To give you a few options, we can ask three similar tutors to get in touch. More info.

Contact Rachael

About me

Hi, my name's Rachael and I'm 22. I am a 4th year medical student studying at Bristol University. 

Availability: Mon-Fri 7pm-9pm. Weekends negotiable. 

My aim is to help students enjoy learning and feel confident in areas they are currently struggling with or just can't bear to look at. I have a flexible approach to tutoring, tailoring my sessions to best suit the student whether they prefer classroom style teaching, Q&A or working through past papers. 

Having sat numerous exams myself over the past 6 years I recognise that there are a variety of learning styles and try to combine explanations with visual aids and questions to consolidate knowledge for any topic that I teach. 

I have been teaching since the age of 16 and over the past 3 years have taught at revision courses for both GCSE and pre-clinical medical students. 

I am available to tutor:

- Biology GCSE/A-level

- Human Biology GCSE

- Science GCSE

- Personal Statement (Mentoring)

- Medical School Preparation (Mentoring)

Please don’t hesitate to contact me if you have any questions and I’ll reply as quickly as possible. I look forward to working with you! 

Subjects offered

SubjectLevelMy prices
Biology A Level £20 /hr
Biology GCSE £18 /hr
Chemistry GCSE £18 /hr
Human Biology GCSE £18 /hr
Maths GCSE £18 /hr
Science GCSE £18 /hr
-Medical School Preparation- Mentoring £20 /hr
-Personal Statements- Mentoring £20 /hr

Qualifications

QualificationLevelGrade
MathematicsA-LevelA
BiologyA-LevelA
Chemistry A-LevelA*
Disclosure and Barring Service

CRB/DBS Standard

No

CRB/DBS Enhanced

26/11/2010

Currently unavailable: for regular students

General Availability

Weeks availability
MonTueWedThuFriSatSun
Weeks availability
Before 12pm12pm - 5pmAfter 5pm
MONDAYMONDAY
TUESDAYTUESDAY
WEDNESDAYWEDNESDAY
THURSDAYTHURSDAY
FRIDAYFRIDAY
SATURDAYSATURDAY
SUNDAYSUNDAY

Please get in touch for more detailed availability

Ratings and reviews

5from 5 customer reviews

Zara (Student) September 4 2016

Very good first session

Janet (Parent) March 3 2016

I am very happy with the tutorials that I've had with Rachael. She researched the area very well in advance before the lesson and she helped improve my knowledge and confidence for my medical school interview. I highly recommend her for interview preparation! Thanks Rachael!

Zara (Student) December 1 2016

Zara (Student) November 8 2016

See all reviews

Questions Rachael has answered

How do vaccinations work?

People are immunised against pathogens through vaccination - usually an injection.  A vaccine is comprised of dead, inactive or weakened pathogen or virus. These act asantigens (foreign proteins) that the body recognises and stimulates the white blood cells (lymphocytes) of the immune system ...

People are immunised against pathogens through vaccination - usually an injection. 

A vaccine is comprised of dead, inactive or weakened pathogen or virus. These act as antigens (foreign proteins) that the body recognises and stimulates the white blood cells (lymphocytes) of the immune system to produce an antibody response. 

When the body first encounters a new antigen it takes time to produce lots of antibodies to fight off the pathogen. When someone is immunised it gives the body time to produce the antibdoes but does not cause disease/illness as the vaccine does not contain live or active pathogens. The immune system remembers what the antigen looks like and the antibody needed to fight it so if the body encounters the same antigen again, it can produce a much quicker immune response producing lots of specific antibodies. 

Vaccines are only specific to the pathogen given becuase the antibodies produced in respone are specific for their shape. 

Vaccines are widesly used to reduce spread of infection amongst a population (less
likely to get an epidemic). If enough people are vaccinated to stop pathogens infecting whole populations it is called herd immunity

see more

11 months ago

375 views
Send a message

All contact details will be kept confidential.

To give you a few options, we can ask three similar tutors to get in touch. More info.

Contact Rachael

Still comparing tutors?

How do we connect with a tutor?

Where are they based?

How much does tuition cost?

How do tutorials work?

Cookies:

We use cookies to improve our service. By continuing to use this website, we'll assume that you're OK with this. Dismiss

mtw:mercury1:status:ok