Emma F. GCSE Spanish tutor, A Level Spanish tutor, A Level Psychology...
£18 - £20 /hr

Emma F.

Degree: Spanish and Psychology (Bachelors) - Liverpool University

Contact Emma
Send a message

All contact details will be kept confidential.

To give you a few options, we can ask three similar tutors to get in touch. More info.

Contact Emma

About me

Who am I?

I am a second year student at the University of Liverpool currently studying Psychology and Spanish. I have always enjoyed supporting my friends with both their learning and personal struggles, so here I am to channel these abilities to help you achieve your personal academic goals. 

I have experience teaching ballet to large and small groups, and I have also tutored in English GCSE, but I will be offering tutoring in Psychology and Spanish up to A Level. 

I can also offer excellent guidance on essay writing, revision techniques, personal statements and the UCAS process as a whole. 

Our sessions

I am mainly here to support you, listen to you and cater to your individual needs, rather than to be your teacher. I will certainly give you "lessons", but they won't be as you know them; they will be on topics YOU have chosen or I think you need extra help with, and I like to incorporate your interests as subject matter to keep everything relevant and enjoyable.

This basically means that if you're into death metal rock, we won't be translating Beyoncé songs or discussing what Freud might have had to say about Miley Cyrus, but we might listen to the Spanish equivalent of Enter Shikari or study why the more gigs you go to, the less daunting mosh pits are. 

I will mark whatever work you give me, but I will do it in a way that trains you to do it better the next time you do a similar assignment. As an example, I will underline grammatical mistakes, but I will ask you to tell me what you think the mistake is and help you understand the concept, rather than me just giving you the answer. This way, with my support, you are in control of your own progress, and your homework will get better grades too. Everyone wins.

What next?

If you would like to arrange a free online meeting with me, send me a Webmail or book a 'Meet the Tutor!' session. Both are accessible through this website, and I will do my absolute best to get back to you within 24 hours, if not that same day. 

Great information to include in your message is your name, your exam board that you are studying and what in particular you need my help with. 

If my listed availability doesn't match yours, include when would work best for you and we can see if we can arrange a time that's good for both of us.

I look forward to meeting you! 

Subjects offered

SubjectLevelMy prices
Psychology A Level £20 /hr
Spanish A Level £20 /hr
Psychology GCSE £18 /hr
Spanish GCSE £18 /hr
-Personal Statements- Mentoring £20 /hr

Qualifications

QualificationLevelGrade
SpanishA-LevelA
DramaA-LevelA
PsychologyA-LevelA
Disclosure and Barring Service

CRB/DBS Standard

No

CRB/DBS Enhanced

No

General Availability

Weeks availability
MonTueWedThuFriSatSun
Weeks availability
Before 12pm12pm - 5pmAfter 5pm
MONDAYMONDAY
TUESDAYTUESDAY
WEDNESDAYWEDNESDAY
THURSDAYTHURSDAY
FRIDAYFRIDAY
SATURDAYSATURDAY
SUNDAYSUNDAY

Please get in touch for more detailed availability

Ratings and reviews

5from 1 customer review

Nicole (Student) March 17 2016

Very nice and productive session

Questions Emma has answered

How do I translate sentences from Spanish to English accurately?

Translating is more about communicating the message of the sentence than translating it word for word. Spanish sentences often have a different syntax (word-order) than English ones, so read the whole sentence first, and rather than trying to translate it directly into English, try and think o...

Translating is more about communicating the message of the sentence than translating it word for word. Spanish sentences often have a different syntax (word-order) than English ones, so read the whole sentence first, and rather than trying to translate it directly into English, try and think of how you would communicate the same message if you had never seen the Spanish version. Remember, your sentence must always make sense in the language you are translating into. 

Below is a simple example:

"El perro de mi madre" would literally translate as "The dog of my mum", but you wouldn't say it like that in English, you would say "My mum's dog". This way, you are communicating exactly the same message as in the Spanish sentence, but saying it in a much more naturally English way.

*TOP TIP* - Remember to look for clues that suggest the tone/formality of the sentence you are translating. For example, if you see "usted", your English sentence should be written in a formal style. Also, if you see the subjunctive mood being used, you should take care to communicate this in the indicative in English, as we do not have any direct translations for the subjunctive mood. 

see more

11 months ago

275 views

How should I start my introduction?

The introduction is where you would be talking about why you're interested in the subject you have chosen to study. This could be a topic area you particularly enjoyed, or another experience that led to you wanting to study it. I would avoid the cliché words like 'passionate' - universities ar...

The introduction is where you would be talking about why you're interested in the subject you have chosen to study. This could be a topic area you particularly enjoyed, or another experience that led to you wanting to study it. I would avoid the cliché words like 'passionate' - universities are sick of them. Give yourself credit where it's due and use a narrative style that is pleasant to read, but this overly floral type of language can be quite repellent and doesn't say much about you. Instead, try detailing things you did to further your knowledge in the area. Reading books, watching relevant TV shows and researching non-specification material are all excellent ways to show you genuinely love your subject, and show that you're capable of independent study, too. 

see more

11 months ago

305 views

What are the advantages and disadvantages of case studies?

Advantages:  They provide a rich source of qualitative information and they often present an opportunity to research rare disorders or situations otherwiseunethical to study. They may also offer some insight on how to conduct further research in the area.  Limitations:  They can be invasive...

Advantages: 

They provide a rich source of qualitative information and they often present an opportunity to research rare disorders or situations otherwise unethical to study. They may also offer some insight on how to conduct further research in the area. 

Limitations: 

They can be invasive and potentially inappropriate, the cannot be generalised to the rest of the population and therefore have low ecological validity, they are very time consuming, they have low reliability because they are nearly impossible to replicate, and they could be subject to investigator bias because the researcher may become attached to the participant. 

*TOP TIP* - The words in bold are great key words you can use to impress the examiner in your essays. 

When you are evaluating research methods, you must talk about them in terms of their ecological validity.

see more

11 months ago

359 views
See all answers
Send a message

All contact details will be kept confidential.

To give you a few options, we can ask three similar tutors to get in touch. More info.

Contact Emma

Still comparing tutors?

How do we connect with a tutor?

Where are they based?

How much does tuition cost?

How do tutorials work?

Cookies:

We use cookies to improve our service. By continuing to use this website, we'll assume that you're OK with this. Dismiss

mtw:mercury1:status:ok