PremiumGrace G. GCSE English Literature tutor, GCSE History tutor, Mentoring...
£24 - £26 /hr

Grace G.

Degree: English Literature (Bachelors) - Exeter University

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About me

I am a friendly English Literature student who has always had a passion for reading and writing. My knowledge and love of History and Sociology has aided my understanding of subjects and life in general. I hope my expertise and love of these subjects show within my tutorials, as I aim to boost the confidence of my students and demonstrate why these subjects are so interesting and important

About my sessions

I have lots of materials and lesson plans devised already, since I have been tutoring for a while and still retain lots of my work from A Level and GCSE. It is something I constantly recap as I like to keep up-to-date with content and any changes, whilst connecting to my students on a level that makes information accessible for them. Each tutorial will cover a different topic and learning is guided by my students at the pace they prefer. Through detailed and enjoyable tutorials that help boost the confidence of my students, I aim to help students work towards their goals. The most important thing for me is that my tutorials are interesting and stimulating, as this is where learning is at its optimum level. I also believe that exam practise is essential, and I like to work through this as we go. After we have gone through all the content, exam focus becomes a priority; my students consolidate the knowledge they have acquired over the course of teaching and combine it with exam practise until they feel they are prepared and confident for the exam. I am here every step of the way, whether it's a quick question or a last minute revision tutorial prior to exams.

Subjects offered

SubjectLevelMy prices
English Literature A Level £26 /hr
History A Level £26 /hr
Sociology A Level £26 /hr
English Literature GCSE £24 /hr
History GCSE £24 /hr
Religious Studies GCSE £24 /hr
Sociology GCSE £24 /hr

Qualifications

QualificationLevelGrade
English LiteratureA-LevelA*
HistoryA-LevelA
SociologyA-LevelA
Disclosure and Barring Service

CRB/DBS Standard

No

CRB/DBS Enhanced

No

General Availability

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Ratings and reviews

4.9from 62 customer reviews

Tom (Parent) April 17 2017

concise, direct and friendly with all information. Thanks!

Roz (Parent) February 28 2017

Great session, really well prepared, supportive and enjoyable. Thank you

KEVIN (Parent) March 16 2017

Lizzie would like to go a little slower.

Dhanalakshmi (Parent) February 17 2017

The class was very detailed and very informative
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Questions Grace has answered

What are the different types of feminism?

Difference feminism: Emphasizes women’s difference/uniqueness and traditionally “feminine” characteristics; argues that more value should be placed on these qualities. Difference Feminists see women as all being separate homogenous groups. This means that they argue that working class and mid...

Difference feminism: Emphasizes women’s difference/uniqueness and traditionally “feminine” characteristics; argues that more value should be placed on these qualities.

Difference Feminists see women as all being separate homogenous groups. This means that they argue that working class and middle class women, white and black women, heterosexual and lesbian women will all have different views and experiences of society, be it patriarchy, homophobia, racism or capitalism.

Key arguments (against other feminists):

§  The main argument of difference feminists is that other feminists fail to take into account the different levels of oppression according to ethnic group.

Criticisms:

§  They focus too much on difference and ignore the similarities of women when facing oppression.

Difference feminists:

Carol Gilligan is a difference feminist who believes in a psychological difference between men and women. She believes that men think more about justice and women think more about relationships, and she wants both to be viewed as equal in western society.

Liberal feminism: Focuses on working within institutions to gain equality for women (e.g., the vote, equal protection under the law) but does not focus on changing the entire institution (e.g., doing away with government). They primarily focus on women’s ability to show and maintain their equality through their own actions and choices and they are often at odds with radical feminism.

Their beliefs:

§  The way to achieve equality is to change law, not through the use of violence

§  They want a cultural change so there are no stereotypes (equal pay act and employment law changes)

§  They believe that men are wrong when they say that there are biological difference between them and women that make them more competent. Liberal feminists believe that it is a culturally constructed view.

§  Ann Oakley (1972) distinguished the difference between gender and sex. Sex is a biological difference; gender is socially constructed

§  They hold the Optimistic Theory: we are gradually leading to more rational views about gender; there should be political action to introduce discriminatory laws and, if this is achieved, we will have a fairer society where people are no longer judged on their gender

Criticisms:

§  Liberal feminists criticise Functionalists for they dislike that they distinguish between different roles (i.e. Males have the instrumental role and are the breadwinner and females have the expressive role and perform domestic tasks. This breeds unequal conjugal roles)

§  Marxist Feminists say that Liberal Feminists ignore Capitalism

§  Radical Feminists say that they are not pushing hard enough for reformation

Marxist/socialist feminism: Attributes women’s oppression to a capitalist economy and the private property system (blames classism for women’s oppression rather than sexism). Argues that capitalism must be overthrown if the oppression of women is to end. Draws parallels between women and “workers” and emphasizes collective change rather than individual change. Alienation happens because women are segregated in the home and men have more opportunity and experience, which breeds unhappiness in women.

Views on family:

§  Male dominance is the result of class division between men who own property (bourgeoisie) and women who do not (proletariat)

§  If wives are to become emancipated from their husbands, they must gain financial stability first and become economically independent

Views on labour:

§  Believe that women workers are exploited more than men

§  They desire domestic tasks to be viewed as work

§  Some believe domestic labour should be socialised

§  They have the Wages-For-Housework campaign

Criticisms:

§  Not much support

§  Too narrow minded

§  Ignores phallic power

Radical feminism: Cutting-edge branch of feminism focused on sweeping social reforms, social change, and revolution. Argues against institutions like patriarchy, heterosexism, and racism and instead emphasizes gender as a social construction, denouncing biological roots of gender difference. Often paves the way for other branches of feminism.

They emphasize the patriarchal roots between men and women and the social dominance of men. They view patriarchy as dividing rights, privileges and power primarily by gender and, as a result, women are oppressed and men are privileged.

They imply that the institutions of male rule are privilege depend on the subordination of women. Men control property and families, oppressing women. They want a major reform in society so that gender roles and patriarchy do not exist.

Three solutions to free women:

§  Separatism: men oppress women at home. Women should live alone and create a new culture of female independence

§  Consciousness raising: raise problems in women-only groups which can result in collective action (e.g. marches)

§  Political lesbianism: heterosexual relationships are oppressive as you are ‘sleeping with the enemy’ so lesbian relationships are advocated 

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1 year ago

1422 views

What do Feminist critics do?

Rediscover texts written by women Revalue women’s experiences Examine representations of women in literature by both men and women Challenge stereotypical representations of women Examine power relations with a view to breaking them down and showing the extent of patriarchy Recognise the ro...

Rediscover texts written by women

Revalue women’s experiences

Examine representations of women in literature by both men and women

Challenge stereotypical representations of women

Examine power relations with a view to breaking them down and showing the extent of patriarchy

Recognise the role of language in making what is social and constructed seem ‘natural’

Raise question of whether men and women are different because of biology or whether they are socially constructed as different

Explore the question of a possible female language and if men also have access to this

Make clear the ideological base o supposedly ‘neutral’ or ‘mainstream’ literary interpretations

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1 year ago

567 views

What do Marxist critics do?

Separately analyse covert and overt content of literary work, linking covert subject matter to basic Marxist themes (e.g. class struggle) and the underlying message the literary work is therefore giving us Relate the context of a work to the social class of the author (assuming that he/she is...

Separately analyse covert and overt content of literary work, linking covert subject matter to basic Marxist themes (e.g. class struggle) and the underlying message the literary work is therefore giving us

Relate the context of a work to the social class of the author (assuming that he/she is unaware of precisely what is being revealed in the text)

Explain the nature of a whole literary genre in terms of the social period which ‘produced it’ e.g. The Great Gatsby in relation to the booming 20’s, the crazy party lifestyle and the underworld of high society within the US at the time

Method known as cultural materialism where the literary work is related to the social assumptions of the time in which it was received

‘Politicisation of literary form’ claims that literary pieces are determined by political circumstances (e.g. Orwell’s 1984) 

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1 year ago

650 views
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