Sam H. GCSE Physics tutor, GCSE Maths tutor, GCSE Further Mathematics...

Sam H.

Currently unavailable: until 27/05/2016

Degree: Physics (Bachelors) - Durham University

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About me

Who Am I?

     -  Physicist at Durham University

     -  Enjoys Teaching!

I'm currently an undergraduate Physicist at Durham University and I want to help you get through your exams with sanity intact. I love teaching and before coming to University I’ve tutored for the 11+ exams.

Outside of my studies I’m involved with student theatre, University-level archery and I also enjoy playing guitar in my free time. (Not important but maybe you were interested!)

What's My Style?

     -  Led by your questions

     -  Links to real research and applications

     -  Stresses the importance of wider reading

I know that Physics and Maths can be one of the most daunting subjects to choose to study but if you look in the right places they can be absolutely fascinating. I hope to be able to make science and maths interesting by bringing tutorials back to real world examples and real world current research.  I feel like often (especially in Mathematics) the uses and applications of an area are not explained suitably and it sometimes feels like you’re learning a topic for no particular reason. My sessions hope to counter that by explaining why a subject is important since that context is often the thing that really helps you grasp a concept.

The most important thing is that the sessions should be led by the student. Hopefully you’ll be able to come to sessions with a particular area you’d like explained. I’ll be able to answer your questions and explain topics that you don’t quite understand as well as trying to explain to you why this area is important and where it is used in the real world.

My sessions will be well paced, with quick breaks taken between problems to show you videos or articles of topics related to the subject matter being discussed. This is important since being interested in the topic being studied makes it so much easier to talk about and understand and a bit of wider reading never hurt anybody.

Where Do We Go Now?

     -  “Webmail” Message

     -  Book a “Meet The Tutor” Session

Drop me a message telling me what exam board and subject you’d like help with!

See you around! :)

Subjects offered

SubjectLevelMy prices
Extended Project Qualification A Level £20 /hr
Further Mathematics A Level £20 /hr
Maths A Level £20 /hr
Physics A Level £20 /hr
Further Mathematics GCSE £18 /hr
Maths GCSE £18 /hr
Physics GCSE £18 /hr

Qualifications

QualificationLevelGrade
MathsA-LevelA*
PhysicsA-LevelA*
Further MathsA-LevelA*
Disclosure and Barring Service

CRB/DBS Standard

No

CRB/DBS Enhanced

No

Currently unavailable: until

27/05/2016

Questions Sam has answered

A positively charged particle enters a magnetic field oriented perpendicular to its direction of motion. Does the particle: A) Change its velocity, B) Change its speed, C) Accelerate in the direction of the magnetic field.

To answer this question you must use the magnetic field "Right Hand Rule". We know that if a charged particle enters a magnetic field it will experience a force ​perpendicular toboth​ the magnetic field and its direction of motion. From this result we know that the particle experiences no forc...

To answer this question you must use the magnetic field "Right Hand Rule". We know that if a charged particle enters a magnetic field it will experience a force ​perpendicular to both​ the magnetic field and its direction of motion.

From this result we know that the particle experiences no force along its direction of motion thus no work is done on the particle by the magnetic field. This means that B is ​False​ since the kinetic energy of the particle can not change. This also shows that C is False​ since the field exerts a "Central Force" on the moving particle causing it to enter a circular trajectory.

By elimination then, A is ​True​. Though the speed of the particle does not change, the direction does as the particle begins circular motion. Since the velocity depends on both the speed and the direction of motion of an object we see that the magnetic field must be causing a change in velocity of the particle.

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10 months ago

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