Harry M. GCSE Maths tutor, A Level Maths tutor, GCSE Physics tutor, A...

Harry M.

£20 - £22 /hr

Studying: Physics (Masters) - Exeter University

4.9
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36 reviews| 56 completed tutorials

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About me

Hey everyone,

If you're reading this, then I assume you're stuck on something physics-y or maths-y. If so, then I can help! I'm a Physics student at Exeter University and I can be your guru. Physics reduces the complex world to something so simple, and so beautiful. To do this, it uses Maths as a tool. They're amazing subjects, or at least I think so. Hopefully you will agree after we've finished.

I'll be patient with you, everyone struggles with new ideas sometimes! I've also been helping people who aren't as fast at picking up ideas as me for as long as I can remember, so you can trust that I know what I'm doing. Obviously you decide what you want to cover in our sessions. It's important to note that in science, you must really understand a concept before you can answer questions on it. If you can't explain it to your 10 year old brother, then you don't understand it quite yet. You will be amazed how much easier questions seem when you truly understand the topic!

Different people have different styles of learning, be it pure equations, or diagrams etc. Whatever it is that works for you, we'll find it. If you still fancy it, and I hope you do, then I look forward to meeting you!

Hey everyone,

If you're reading this, then I assume you're stuck on something physics-y or maths-y. If so, then I can help! I'm a Physics student at Exeter University and I can be your guru. Physics reduces the complex world to something so simple, and so beautiful. To do this, it uses Maths as a tool. They're amazing subjects, or at least I think so. Hopefully you will agree after we've finished.

I'll be patient with you, everyone struggles with new ideas sometimes! I've also been helping people who aren't as fast at picking up ideas as me for as long as I can remember, so you can trust that I know what I'm doing. Obviously you decide what you want to cover in our sessions. It's important to note that in science, you must really understand a concept before you can answer questions on it. If you can't explain it to your 10 year old brother, then you don't understand it quite yet. You will be amazed how much easier questions seem when you truly understand the topic!

Different people have different styles of learning, be it pure equations, or diagrams etc. Whatever it is that works for you, we'll find it. If you still fancy it, and I hope you do, then I look forward to meeting you!

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About my sessions

My sessions' structure depends on the needs of the student. Some are looking for support to supplement their school learning. In this case, I will normally work parallel to the student's class time. We will go over the material they have worked through in class firstly, allowing time for any questions on sections they may not have fully grasped. It is also good at this point to go into slightly more depth than they may have covered, just to ensure total clarity. I will try to locate some questions which we can then have a go at, to try and build up the student's confidence. Time permitting, we might have a quick look at what's coming up next, to give the student confidence moving forward.

Some students know exactly what they want to do in each session, and come armed with exam questions and queries. In this case, I am more there as technical assistance whenever they may get stuck on a part of a question.

Others only need a session or two on a particular topic which they are struggling with. Here we will run through the topic thoroughly, allow for questions and then tackle questions.

In all cases, success is about confidence. Everything I do is geared towards making my students more confident in their own abilities. I try to coax them towards answers rather than giving it to them, so that they feel they can do it. When they believe in themselves, they are much more likely to succeed.

My sessions' structure depends on the needs of the student. Some are looking for support to supplement their school learning. In this case, I will normally work parallel to the student's class time. We will go over the material they have worked through in class firstly, allowing time for any questions on sections they may not have fully grasped. It is also good at this point to go into slightly more depth than they may have covered, just to ensure total clarity. I will try to locate some questions which we can then have a go at, to try and build up the student's confidence. Time permitting, we might have a quick look at what's coming up next, to give the student confidence moving forward.

Some students know exactly what they want to do in each session, and come armed with exam questions and queries. In this case, I am more there as technical assistance whenever they may get stuck on a part of a question.

Others only need a session or two on a particular topic which they are struggling with. Here we will run through the topic thoroughly, allow for questions and then tackle questions.

In all cases, success is about confidence. Everything I do is geared towards making my students more confident in their own abilities. I try to coax them towards answers rather than giving it to them, so that they feel they can do it. When they believe in themselves, they are much more likely to succeed.

Show more

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Ratings & Reviews

4.9from 36 customer reviews
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Lynn (Parent)

January 7 2017

Harry quickly and efficiently explains concepts to my son. My son feels so much more confident about his A level Physics. Despite the distances involved it has been no barrier to several successful sessions.

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Lynn (Parent)

December 10 2016

Very clear and helpful with a sound understanding of the subject at hand

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Jeanette (Parent)

November 6 2016

Great, many thanks.

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Nabil (Parent)

May 22 2016

Ive gone through many tutors throughout this year for AS Physics, and none have understood and explained the concepts as clearly as Harry did. Excellent tutor, highly recommend!

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Qualifications

SubjectQualificationGrade
MathsA-level (A2)A
Further MathsA-level (A2)B
PhysicsA-level (A2)A
Ancient HistoryA-level (A2)B

General Availability

Before 12pm12pm - 5pmAfter 5pm
mondays
tuesdays
wednesdays
thursdays
fridays
saturdays
sundays

Subjects offered

SubjectQualificationPrices
MathsA Level£22 /hr
PhysicsA Level£22 /hr
MathsGCSE£20 /hr
PhysicsGCSE£20 /hr

Questions Harry has answered

Explain Newton's laws of motion

The first law is that an object will remain at a constant velocity or stationary (which is just a constant velocity of zero) unless acted upon by an external force.

Once acted upon by this force, then the second law comes into play. This says that F = ma, or Force equals mass times the acceleration of the object.

The third law is easily stated as every action has an equal and opposite reaction. This means the sizes of the forces on the objects will be the same, but the forces will be in opposite directions.

The first law is that an object will remain at a constant velocity or stationary (which is just a constant velocity of zero) unless acted upon by an external force.

Once acted upon by this force, then the second law comes into play. This says that F = ma, or Force equals mass times the acceleration of the object.

The third law is easily stated as every action has an equal and opposite reaction. This means the sizes of the forces on the objects will be the same, but the forces will be in opposite directions.

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2 years ago

702 views

Explain Rutherford's atomic model experiment

Rutherford had a sheet of gold foil just a few atoms thick, and surrounded it with detectors. He then fired alpha particles at the gold sheet, knowing that these were positively charged. Some of these were deflected from their paths, a very small number were reflected, but most passed straight through the foil. This told Rutherford that most of the atom must be empty space. He explained the deflections and reflections with a concentration of charge in the middle of the space of each atom. As so few were reflected and deflected compared to those that went straight through, the charge must be tiny compared to the atom. As it was repelling the positive alpha particles, it must also be positive. This was the nucleus.

Rutherford had a sheet of gold foil just a few atoms thick, and surrounded it with detectors. He then fired alpha particles at the gold sheet, knowing that these were positively charged. Some of these were deflected from their paths, a very small number were reflected, but most passed straight through the foil. This told Rutherford that most of the atom must be empty space. He explained the deflections and reflections with a concentration of charge in the middle of the space of each atom. As so few were reflected and deflected compared to those that went straight through, the charge must be tiny compared to the atom. As it was repelling the positive alpha particles, it must also be positive. This was the nucleus.

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2 years ago

688 views

How do you integrate by parts?

This is one of the trickier methods of integration, and it requires some practise. The basic idea is to split a function which would be difficult to integrate into two parts. Differentiating one part and integrating the other will then lead to a function which is much easier to integrate.

The formula is that the integral of u dv = uv - the integral of v du. It is best demonstrated with an example:

Let's integrate f(x) = xcos(x)

We can see that x will disppear if we differentiate it, so let's set x = u and cos(x) = dv.

Differentiating u and integrating dv then gives du = 1 and v = sin(x)

Now we substitute these into the formula: xsin(x) - integral of sin(x)

Sin(x) is easy to integrate, it is just -cos(x). Now we have our answer! The integral of xcos(x) = xsin(x) + cos(x) + c, where c is our unknown (and always necessary!) constant of integration.

This is one of the trickier methods of integration, and it requires some practise. The basic idea is to split a function which would be difficult to integrate into two parts. Differentiating one part and integrating the other will then lead to a function which is much easier to integrate.

The formula is that the integral of u dv = uv - the integral of v du. It is best demonstrated with an example:

Let's integrate f(x) = xcos(x)

We can see that x will disppear if we differentiate it, so let's set x = u and cos(x) = dv.

Differentiating u and integrating dv then gives du = 1 and v = sin(x)

Now we substitute these into the formula: xsin(x) - integral of sin(x)

Sin(x) is easy to integrate, it is just -cos(x). Now we have our answer! The integral of xcos(x) = xsin(x) + cos(x) + c, where c is our unknown (and always necessary!) constant of integration.

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2 years ago

750 views

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