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£22 - £24 /hr

Rowan F.

Degree: Chemistry (Masters) - Bristol University

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About me

About Me  I am a second year Chemistry student at the University of Bristol and a long with my love for Chemistry I am also incredibly interested in Maths and Biology, enjoying studying both of them at A level. By tutoring that I hope I can pass on my love to other students. I have experience tutoring Biology, Chemistry and Maths in my school to lower years and have tutored people with a variety of learning styles and of a variety of ages. I will treat you more like a peer than a teacher as I am incredibly friendly, I think this will cause a more relaxed and informal tutorial.  Tutorials  During each session you will lead the topics you want to discuss or questions you want to go through. We will start with going through explanations of concepts, where I will try to be as visual as possible to aid understanding, and then go onto questions and exam practice.  I am very open for feedback and  for suggestions on how a tutorial can be suited to you so that you can get the most out of the session and most importantly for it to be enjoyable.  Any questions do not hesitate to ask, I look forward to hearing from you! 

Subjects offered

SubjectQualificationPrices
Chemistry A Level £24 /hr
Maths A Level £24 /hr
Biology GCSE £22 /hr
Chemistry GCSE £22 /hr
Maths GCSE £22 /hr

Qualifications

SubjectQualificationLevelGrade
ChemistryA-levelA2A*
BiologyA-levelA2A*
MathematicsA-levelA2A*
General StudiesA-levelA2A*
Disclosure and Barring Service

CRB/DBS Standard

No

CRB/DBS Enhanced

No

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Ratings and reviews

4.9from 110 customer reviews

Justine (Parent) May 22 2017

really helpful

Emily (Student) March 28 2017

great bank of knowledge brought to mind quickly and very patient with explainations

Emily (Student) February 21 2017

Really friendly and so helpful :)

Jung (Student) February 2 2017

Another great tuition session, thank you!
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Questions Rowan has answered

Differentiate y=x/sin(x)

This equation has one function of x divided by another function of x, we therefore have to use the quotient rule and is written in the form f(x)/g(x).  The quotient rule is therefore f'(x)g(x)-g'(x)f(x)/g2(x) The first step would be to differentiate f(x) and g(x).  f'(x)=1 g'(x)=cos(x) The ...

This equation has one function of x divided by another function of x, we therefore have to use the quotient rule and is written in the form f(x)/g(x). 

The quotient rule is therefore

f'(x)g(x)-g'(x)f(x)/g2(x)

The first step would be to differentiate f(x) and g(x). 

f'(x)=1 g'(x)=cos(x)

The numerator of this fraction would therefore be 

1*sin(x)-xcos(x) =sin(x)-xcos(x)

To calculate the denominator you simply square g(x)

g2(x)= sin2(x)

So the answer would be sin(x)-xcos(x)/sin2(x)

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2 years ago

960 views

How will the position of equilibrium shift for an endothermic reaction when heated?

The position of equilibrium will shift to the right, favouring the forward reaction, to oppose the increase in temperature. Endothermic reactions absorb heat and therefore if the endothermic reaction is more prevalent heat will be absorbed and the temperature will decrease. 

2 years ago

706 views

What causes bacteria to become antibiotic resistant?

Mutations, which is a change in the base code of DNA, occur regularly and can have various affects on organisms. Some mutations may give the bacteria an advantage against an antibiotic, for example if the target site for the antibiotic was altered then the antibiotic may be less able to bind, ...

Mutations, which is a change in the base code of DNA, occur regularly and can have various affects on organisms. Some mutations may give the bacteria an advantage against an antibiotic, for example if the target site for the antibiotic was altered then the antibiotic may be less able to bind, so has less of an effect on the bacteria. This means the bacteria with this mutation have an advantage and natural selection occurs when an antibiotic is applied to the culture of bacteria so that the resistant bacteria survive and therefore can reproduce with less competition and pass on their antibiotic resistant mutation. 

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2 years ago

659 views
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