Rudolfs T. IB Physics tutor, IB Maths tutor

Rudolfs T.

£26 /hr

Currently unavailable: for regular students

Studying: Physics with Theoretical Physics (Masters) - Manchester University

5.0
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16 reviews| 39 completed tutorials

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About me

I am a theoretical physics student at the University of Manchester. Even though I'm only in my first year I've had a lot of interaction with science already. I have participated and obtained medals in the International Physics Olympiad and the International Chemistry Olympiad. This year I've also been involved with helping students prepare for the physics olympiad by conducting a lecture and preparing sample problems for them to solve. I believe that in science and mathematics very little memorization is necessary and everyone can understand the underlying concepts. I hope to ignite interest in students towards science and help them to achieve the grades they hope for.I am a theoretical physics student at the University of Manchester. Even though I'm only in my first year I've had a lot of interaction with science already. I have participated and obtained medals in the International Physics Olympiad and the International Chemistry Olympiad. This year I've also been involved with helping students prepare for the physics olympiad by conducting a lecture and preparing sample problems for them to solve. I believe that in science and mathematics very little memorization is necessary and everyone can understand the underlying concepts. I hope to ignite interest in students towards science and help them to achieve the grades they hope for.

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Ratings & Reviews

5from 16 customer reviews
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Oscar (Student)

October 23 2016

very good and patient

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Ishaan (Student)

October 18 2016

Worked extremely hard and helped me thoroughly with my problem at each stage!

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Omar (Parent)

March 25 2016

Great class, very enthusiastic teacher!

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Oscar (Student)

November 24 2016

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Qualifications

SubjectQualificationGrade
PhysicsInternational Baccalaureate (IB)7
MathematicsInternational Baccalaureate (IB)7
ChemistryInternational Baccalaureate (IB)7
English language and literatureInternational Baccalaureate (IB)7
Latvian literatureInternational Baccalaureate (IB)6
GeographyInternational Baccalaureate (IB)6

General Availability

Before 12pm12pm - 5pmAfter 5pm
mondays
tuesdays
wednesdays
thursdays
fridays
saturdays
sundays

Subjects offered

SubjectQualificationPrices
MathsIB£26 /hr
PhysicsIB£26 /hr

Questions Rudolfs has answered

Why is (-1)*(-1)=1?

Even though this question seems trivial to most people with some mathematical expertise, it actually cuts quite deep into an intuitive understanding of what multiplication truly is. When one writes an expression like "5*2=10" what they really mean is that if I take two piles of 5 apples (or 5 piles of 2 apples) I get a total of 10 apples, but sadly this intuitive approach doesn't really generalize well to negative numbers. What does it mean to take (-1) of some object? To intuitively understand what multiplication is a different approach is required. Imagine I take a meter-stick with length 5 and scale it by a factor of 2. I clearly get a new meter-stick that has a length of 10. I could also scale it by something like a factor of pi and get another meter-stick with some length, so clearly this approach doesn't rely on the fact that the number is an intiger. In this case multiplication by a negative number would simply reverse the direction of the meter stick. If it was initially pointing to the right (the positive number direction), after multiplying it by -1 it would simply point in the opposite direction. Multiplying by -2 would just be a combination of two operations: first of all we would scale the meter stick by a factor of 2 and follow the scaling by an inversion. So, clearly, if we start with the number -1, which is simply a meter-stick of length one in the negative direction, and multiply it by -1, we invert it and get a meter-stick in the positive direction, which also has length 1. Hence (-1)*(-1)=1

Even though this question seems trivial to most people with some mathematical expertise, it actually cuts quite deep into an intuitive understanding of what multiplication truly is. When one writes an expression like "5*2=10" what they really mean is that if I take two piles of 5 apples (or 5 piles of 2 apples) I get a total of 10 apples, but sadly this intuitive approach doesn't really generalize well to negative numbers. What does it mean to take (-1) of some object? To intuitively understand what multiplication is a different approach is required. Imagine I take a meter-stick with length 5 and scale it by a factor of 2. I clearly get a new meter-stick that has a length of 10. I could also scale it by something like a factor of pi and get another meter-stick with some length, so clearly this approach doesn't rely on the fact that the number is an intiger. In this case multiplication by a negative number would simply reverse the direction of the meter stick. If it was initially pointing to the right (the positive number direction), after multiplying it by -1 it would simply point in the opposite direction. Multiplying by -2 would just be a combination of two operations: first of all we would scale the meter stick by a factor of 2 and follow the scaling by an inversion. So, clearly, if we start with the number -1, which is simply a meter-stick of length one in the negative direction, and multiply it by -1, we invert it and get a meter-stick in the positive direction, which also has length 1. Hence (-1)*(-1)=1

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2 years ago

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