Melissa K. A Level Chemistry tutor, GCSE Chemistry tutor, GCSE Japane...

Melissa K.

Unavailable

Chemistry (Masters) - Durham University

4.8
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6 reviews

This tutor is also part of our Schools Programme. They are trusted by teachers to deliver high-quality 1:1 tuition that complements the school curriculum.

13 completed lessons

About me

About me:

Hi, I'm Melissa and I'm a student at Durham University with a passion for chemistry. I love teaching the subject and imparting my enthusiasm on to others. 

I have a lot of tutoring experience. At school I tutored maths and Japanese to younger student and whilst being at University, I have volunteered to tutor A-Level Chemistry. And when it comes to teaching, I'm a patient and friendly.

Sessions:

I want to make the sessions fun and enjoyable, and provide another view point from which to look at things. Learning chemistry can be tough, but I like to explain things logically and make connections between topic areas to make learning easy since so many things in chemistry are connected. I'll use visuals as much as I can as this will help you to learn. I want you to guide the sessions and tell me what you want to learn.

Applying to Durham?

I'm a student at Durham University so if you need any help with applying, please let me know and I'll help you out as much as possible!

Japanese

I also have a Japanese A-Level at A* and it is another subject which I enjoy studying. Although I major in chemistry, I would still love to teach Japanese as it is my other passion in life. I can tutor GCSE (in which I got an A* myself) and help you learn grammar, kanji and vocab.

What next?

If you have any questions, please send me a 'WebMail' or book a 'Meet the Tutor Session' which are available through this website. Don't forget to let me know you're struggling with and your exam board too.

About me:

Hi, I'm Melissa and I'm a student at Durham University with a passion for chemistry. I love teaching the subject and imparting my enthusiasm on to others. 

I have a lot of tutoring experience. At school I tutored maths and Japanese to younger student and whilst being at University, I have volunteered to tutor A-Level Chemistry. And when it comes to teaching, I'm a patient and friendly.

Sessions:

I want to make the sessions fun and enjoyable, and provide another view point from which to look at things. Learning chemistry can be tough, but I like to explain things logically and make connections between topic areas to make learning easy since so many things in chemistry are connected. I'll use visuals as much as I can as this will help you to learn. I want you to guide the sessions and tell me what you want to learn.

Applying to Durham?

I'm a student at Durham University so if you need any help with applying, please let me know and I'll help you out as much as possible!

Japanese

I also have a Japanese A-Level at A* and it is another subject which I enjoy studying. Although I major in chemistry, I would still love to teach Japanese as it is my other passion in life. I can tutor GCSE (in which I got an A* myself) and help you learn grammar, kanji and vocab.

What next?

If you have any questions, please send me a 'WebMail' or book a 'Meet the Tutor Session' which are available through this website. Don't forget to let me know you're struggling with and your exam board too.

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Personally interviewed by MyTutor

We only take tutor applications from candidates who are studying at the UK’s leading universities. Candidates who fulfil our grade criteria then pass to the interview stage, where a member of the MyTutor team will personally assess them for subject knowledge, communication skills and general tutoring approach. About 1 in 7 becomes a tutor on our site.

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24/11/2014

Ratings & Reviews

4.8from 6 customer reviews
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Lily (Parent from Newport)

April 7 2016

Very good

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Lily (Parent from Newport)

April 2 2016

Good session. Thank you.

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Lily (Parent from Newport)

April 1 2016

Good lesson. Thank you.

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Lily (Parent from Newport)

March 30 2016

Very informative

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Qualifications

SubjectQualificationGrade
MathematicsA-level (A2)A*
JapaneseA-level (A2)A*
ChemistryA-level (A2)A
BiologyA-level (A2)B

Subjects offered

SubjectQualificationPrices
ChemistryA Level£20 /hr
ChemistryGCSE£18 /hr
JapaneseGCSE£18 /hr
MathsGCSE£18 /hr
Maths13 Plus£18 /hr
Science13 Plus£18 /hr

Questions Melissa has answered

Why at room temperature is H2O a liquid, but H2S is a gas?

This question is basically just asking you why water has a higher boiling point that H2S. So you need to ask yourself what is the factor which means water has a higher boiling point? If you remember back to electronegativies of the elements in the periodic table, you may recall that the elements in the top right hand corner are the most electronegitive (i.e. they pull electron density towards them). Oxygen sits above sulfur in row 6 of the periodic table and so is more electronegative. Furthermore, you may also recall that F, N and O are the three most electronegative atoms in the table. This property means that when they are attached to a hydrogen (which has a much lower electronegativity) there is a difference in electronegativity. This different is particularly large for H-F, H-N and H-O, resulting in a special intermolecular interaction called hydrogen bonding which is exclusive to these bonds. Therefore, H2O has a higher boiling point than H2S because H2O has the ability to hydrogen bond whereas H2S does not. Hydrogen bonds are stronger than other intermolecular interactions such as van der Waals interactions or dipole-dipole interations, so require more energy to break them. Hence, water has a higher boiling point (or is a liquid at room temperature) whereas H2S is a gas at room temperature.

This question is basically just asking you why water has a higher boiling point that H2S. So you need to ask yourself what is the factor which means water has a higher boiling point? If you remember back to electronegativies of the elements in the periodic table, you may recall that the elements in the top right hand corner are the most electronegitive (i.e. they pull electron density towards them). Oxygen sits above sulfur in row 6 of the periodic table and so is more electronegative. Furthermore, you may also recall that F, N and O are the three most electronegative atoms in the table. This property means that when they are attached to a hydrogen (which has a much lower electronegativity) there is a difference in electronegativity. This different is particularly large for H-F, H-N and H-O, resulting in a special intermolecular interaction called hydrogen bonding which is exclusive to these bonds. Therefore, H2O has a higher boiling point than H2S because H2O has the ability to hydrogen bond whereas H2S does not. Hydrogen bonds are stronger than other intermolecular interactions such as van der Waals interactions or dipole-dipole interations, so require more energy to break them. Hence, water has a higher boiling point (or is a liquid at room temperature) whereas H2S is a gas at room temperature.

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2 years ago

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