Alice H. GCSE Biology tutor, GCSE Chemistry tutor, GCSE Maths tutor, ...

Alice H.

Unavailable

Biology (Bachelors) - Bristol University

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3 completed lessons

About me

I'm a Biology student at the University of Bristol who is passionate about both science and music having studied them at A level. I would love to help anybody who is struggling with specific concepts or just needs someone to guide them through their course and revision.

Having tutored a student through Common Entrance Science and working in a prep school for a month, I feel confident engaging with students to explain ideas and encouraging them with their subject. Whilst exams and tests are important, enthusiasm for your subjects is also key to succeeding and this is what I would hope to pass on through tutoring.

I'm a Biology student at the University of Bristol who is passionate about both science and music having studied them at A level. I would love to help anybody who is struggling with specific concepts or just needs someone to guide them through their course and revision.

Having tutored a student through Common Entrance Science and working in a prep school for a month, I feel confident engaging with students to explain ideas and encouraging them with their subject. Whilst exams and tests are important, enthusiasm for your subjects is also key to succeeding and this is what I would hope to pass on through tutoring.

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Personally interviewed by MyTutor

We only take tutor applications from candidates who are studying at the UK’s leading universities. Candidates who fulfil our grade criteria then pass to the interview stage, where a member of the MyTutor team will personally assess them for subject knowledge, communication skills and general tutoring approach. About 1 in 7 becomes a tutor on our site.

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Qualifications

SubjectQualificationGrade
BiologyA-level (A2)A
ChemistryA-level (A2)A
MathsA-level (A2)A
MusicA-level (A2)A

Subjects offered

SubjectQualificationPrices
BiologyA Level£20 /hr
BiologyGCSE£18 /hr
ChemistryGCSE£18 /hr
MathsGCSE£18 /hr
MusicGCSE£18 /hr

Questions Alice has answered

What are the methods of immobilising enzymes?

There are four methods of enzyme immobilisation: adsorption, covalent bonding, entrapment and membrane separation.

Adsorption involves mixing the enyzme with an immobilsing support so the enzyme molecules will bind to it because of hydrophobic interactions and ionic links. The support is called an adsorbing agent and could be porous carbon, glass beads or clays.

Covalent bonds between enzyme molecules and an insoluble material, such as clay, are formed using cross-linking agents (e.g. sepharose).

Entrapping the enzyme molecules in a network or gel beads or cellulose fibres allows the enzyme to be immobilised in their natural state (not attached to another molecule). 

Membrane separation physicially separates the enzyme and substrate solutions with a partially permeable membrane. Both the substrate and product molecules are small enough to pass through the membrane.

There are four methods of enzyme immobilisation: adsorption, covalent bonding, entrapment and membrane separation.

Adsorption involves mixing the enyzme with an immobilsing support so the enzyme molecules will bind to it because of hydrophobic interactions and ionic links. The support is called an adsorbing agent and could be porous carbon, glass beads or clays.

Covalent bonds between enzyme molecules and an insoluble material, such as clay, are formed using cross-linking agents (e.g. sepharose).

Entrapping the enzyme molecules in a network or gel beads or cellulose fibres allows the enzyme to be immobilised in their natural state (not attached to another molecule). 

Membrane separation physicially separates the enzyme and substrate solutions with a partially permeable membrane. Both the substrate and product molecules are small enough to pass through the membrane.

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2 years ago

2566 views

What is the myelin sheath?

The myelin sheath is a layer of insulating, fatty material that encases some neurones. The sheath is composed of Schwann cells that have gaps called nodes of Ranvier between them. Potassium and sodium ions can only diffuse in and out of the neurone at these gaps. This allows saltatory or 'jumping' conduction where the local currents are elongated as the sodium ions have to diffuse further along the neurone before the action potential can occur. The action potential appears to 'jump' from one node of Ranvier to another.

The myelin sheath is a layer of insulating, fatty material that encases some neurones. The sheath is composed of Schwann cells that have gaps called nodes of Ranvier between them. Potassium and sodium ions can only diffuse in and out of the neurone at these gaps. This allows saltatory or 'jumping' conduction where the local currents are elongated as the sodium ions have to diffuse further along the neurone before the action potential can occur. The action potential appears to 'jump' from one node of Ranvier to another.

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2 years ago

1036 views

What is tonality?

Tonality describes what key a piece is in or what tonal relationships are used. When asked to talk about tonality you should discuss whether the key is major or minor and the different modulations used during the piece e.g. in bar 60 the music moved from C major to the dominant (G) major.

Tonality describes what key a piece is in or what tonal relationships are used. When asked to talk about tonality you should discuss whether the key is major or minor and the different modulations used during the piece e.g. in bar 60 the music moved from C major to the dominant (G) major.

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2 years ago

1350 views

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