Oliver W.

Oliver W.

£22 - £26 /hr

Philosophy (Masters) - Mansfield College, Oxford University

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55 completed lessons

About me

My name is Oli. I am a Philosophy graduate from the University of Warwick, where I received a First Class Bachelor's Degree. I am now doing postgraduate study at the University of Oxford in Philosophy.


I have a great love of literature, and a very thorough understanding of the grammatical and historical underpinnings of the English language. My philosophical interests are broadly ethical, political, and metaphysical philosophy. My knowledge base is wide in all three areas, and I am also well versed in a host of other areas from the history of philosophy. I’m a friendly person with plenty of tutoring experience, both formally and informally, with private clients and through schools. I also regularly tutor first- and second-year philosophy students at my university. I foster a friendly working relationship and environment, and I aim to promote interest as well as understanding in the fields I tutor in.


Any questions? Get in Touch! Please send me a message through the website so that we can talk about things further. Give me an overview of what you’re struggling with, as well as how you want to go about tackling that (we can work on this together), and we’ll take it from there!

My name is Oli. I am a Philosophy graduate from the University of Warwick, where I received a First Class Bachelor's Degree. I am now doing postgraduate study at the University of Oxford in Philosophy.


I have a great love of literature, and a very thorough understanding of the grammatical and historical underpinnings of the English language. My philosophical interests are broadly ethical, political, and metaphysical philosophy. My knowledge base is wide in all three areas, and I am also well versed in a host of other areas from the history of philosophy. I’m a friendly person with plenty of tutoring experience, both formally and informally, with private clients and through schools. I also regularly tutor first- and second-year philosophy students at my university. I foster a friendly working relationship and environment, and I aim to promote interest as well as understanding in the fields I tutor in.


Any questions? Get in Touch! Please send me a message through the website so that we can talk about things further. Give me an overview of what you’re struggling with, as well as how you want to go about tackling that (we can work on this together), and we’ll take it from there!

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About my sessions

The best way for you to better your understanding of a topic is for you to guide me on what you are struggling with. My aim then is to give you a few new perspectives and methods in order to help you gain a rounded understanding of the things you are finding difficult. This is an approach I was taught during work experience as a teaching assistant and running theatre workshops. The goal is for you to find a way you are comfortable with approaching the difficulty – this makes it much easier to overcome.

I’m happy to give advice in essay writing and cutting, and similar help for personal statements. Writing clearly and concisely is very much my area of expertise as a philosophy student! However, I am also very happy to look at past papers and mark schemes with you in order to address more specific difficulties, and I am experienced in dealing with A Level and GCSE courses both as a student and as a tutor.

Any questions? Get in Touch! Please send me a message through the website so that we can talk about things further. Give me an overview of what you’re struggling with, as well as how you want to go about tackling that (we can work on this together), and we’ll take it from there!

The best way for you to better your understanding of a topic is for you to guide me on what you are struggling with. My aim then is to give you a few new perspectives and methods in order to help you gain a rounded understanding of the things you are finding difficult. This is an approach I was taught during work experience as a teaching assistant and running theatre workshops. The goal is for you to find a way you are comfortable with approaching the difficulty – this makes it much easier to overcome.

I’m happy to give advice in essay writing and cutting, and similar help for personal statements. Writing clearly and concisely is very much my area of expertise as a philosophy student! However, I am also very happy to look at past papers and mark schemes with you in order to address more specific difficulties, and I am experienced in dealing with A Level and GCSE courses both as a student and as a tutor.

Any questions? Get in Touch! Please send me a message through the website so that we can talk about things further. Give me an overview of what you’re struggling with, as well as how you want to go about tackling that (we can work on this together), and we’ll take it from there!

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Personally interviewed by MyTutor

We only take tutor applications from candidates who are studying at the UK’s leading universities. Candidates who fulfil our grade criteria then pass to the interview stage, where a member of the MyTutor team will personally assess them for subject knowledge, communication skills and general tutoring approach. About 1 in 7 becomes a tutor on our site.

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Enhanced DBS Check

23 Aug, 2016

Ratings & Reviews

5
18 reviews
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KS
Pinned

Kshama Parent from Dubai

8 Apr, 2017

The lesson went as planned. I received very detailed feedback of what I need to work on. Oli seemed very helpful in making corrections and pushing my response up into the top band of marks.

KS
Pinned

Kshama Parent from Dubai

6 Apr, 2017

The tutorial was so helpful. I really needed this kind of help. Oli really had a strategic approach to what I needed help with.

BM
Pinned

Bilal Student

9 Jan, 2017

Great session, gave essential tips and explained the content really well.

CK
Pinned

Carlene Parent

15 Dec, 2016

I really enjoyed my session with Oliver and got a huge amount out of it. He had clearly done a lot of preparation, and asked for feedback as we continued to make sure we were on the right track and answering the specific areas I was hoping to cover. He not only has a breadth of knowledge to contextualise the topic we were working on, but also a depth of knowledge to make sure learning can happen in a meaningful way. Thank you for a lovely session Oliver!

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Qualifications

SubjectQualificationGrade
English LiteratureA-level (A2)A*
English LanguageA-level (A2)A
PhilosophyA-level (A2)A
PhilosophyDegree (Bachelors)FIRST CLASS (1)

General Availability

MonTueWedThuFriSatSun
Pre 12pm
12 - 5pm
After 5pm

Pre 12pm

12 - 5pm

After 5pm
Mon
Tue
Wed
Thu
Fri
Sat
Sun

Subjects offered

SubjectQualificationPrice
PhilosophyA Level£26 /hr
Philosophy and EthicsA Level£26 /hr
EnglishGCSE£22 /hr
English LanguageGCSE£22 /hr
English LiteratureGCSE£22 /hr
PhilosophyGCSE£22 /hr
Philosophy and EthicsGCSE£22 /hr
Personal StatementsMentoring£26 /hr
PhilosophyUniversity£26 /hr

Questions Oliver has answered

How do contextual factors affect language use?

This is a broad question, and in the exam it is more likely that you will be asked how contextual factors affect language use in particular modes. That said, there are some universal ideas which you can apply to see how to go about answering these questions.Whatever the mode is -- let's say it's text messaging -- you need to consider the features of language specific to this mode. Text language has nearly exclusive use of emoticons, for example. It's also a nice example because (and you can and should point this out) it is somewhat of an amalgamation between spoken and written language. So, we sometimes get orthography which is phoneticised for emphasis, or simply because it is reflecting the spoken language influence on text messaging. We also get, in varying degrees, and depending on the author, use of formal grammar constructs from written language. Other things to consider is the fact that text messaging often utilises the spoken language feature of turn-taking, and takes on a conversational, informal tenor, too.Hopefully I'm showing how this works. You need to be able to show how the context of the language being used -- so, the mode, the function, and so on -- impact the way in which it is used. This isn't so hard as it first appears, because all these things are pretty interconnected anwyay. Our language use is always affected by contextual factors, so the thing you really need to work on is indentifying the contextual factors in the case you are given.This is a broad question, and in the exam it is more likely that you will be asked how contextual factors affect language use in particular modes. That said, there are some universal ideas which you can apply to see how to go about answering these questions.Whatever the mode is -- let's say it's text messaging -- you need to consider the features of language specific to this mode. Text language has nearly exclusive use of emoticons, for example. It's also a nice example because (and you can and should point this out) it is somewhat of an amalgamation between spoken and written language. So, we sometimes get orthography which is phoneticised for emphasis, or simply because it is reflecting the spoken language influence on text messaging. We also get, in varying degrees, and depending on the author, use of formal grammar constructs from written language. Other things to consider is the fact that text messaging often utilises the spoken language feature of turn-taking, and takes on a conversational, informal tenor, too.Hopefully I'm showing how this works. You need to be able to show how the context of the language being used -- so, the mode, the function, and so on -- impact the way in which it is used. This isn't so hard as it first appears, because all these things are pretty interconnected anwyay. Our language use is always affected by contextual factors, so the thing you really need to work on is indentifying the contextual factors in the case you are given.

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3 years ago

4071 views

How do I write a good 'How far do you agree' essay answer?

The first thing to decide is how far you do agree with whatever claim it is about whatever text. In very general terms, there will be three answers:(1) I completely agree.(2) I completely disagree.(3) I'm somewhere inbetween.If your answer is (1) or (2), your essay is going to focus very heavily on the side of the argument you agree with, but it is important to not just assert your point of view. The trick to a good essay in these cases is to also consider the other view and to explain and argue throughout your essay why it is that your view is the right one. You need to end being able to conclude that you completely agree/disagree because it would be wrong to disagree/agree. Showing awareness of other interpretations is the way to access the top marks.If your answer is (3) then you need to basically do the same as above, but of course your conclusion will be somewhere in the middle. This requires that you agree for reasons but disagree for reasons y. Your cocnlusion is likely to look something like this:"In conclusion, whilst I agree that Bronte presents as a violent emotion, I also think it is shown to be tender at times, and that it is the relationship and balance between the violence and tenderness of love and other aspects of the novel which allow Bronte to use the theme of love so powerfully."The points which I have vaguely addressed in that conclusion would have to have been argued for throughout the essay. I find a good way to pan out these arguments is to write a brief plan which includes an introduction/conclusion so that you know what you want to argue for, and then to list the relevant points and order them into a structure which will argue for your stance.So, things to remember:Agree/Disagree/Somewhere between.Consider both sides of the argument.Always explain why your side of the argument wins out -- in every paragraph.Introduce and conclude your answer very clearly (the argumentation is in the body).The first thing to decide is how far you do agree with whatever claim it is about whatever text. In very general terms, there will be three answers:(1) I completely agree.(2) I completely disagree.(3) I'm somewhere inbetween.If your answer is (1) or (2), your essay is going to focus very heavily on the side of the argument you agree with, but it is important to not just assert your point of view. The trick to a good essay in these cases is to also consider the other view and to explain and argue throughout your essay why it is that your view is the right one. You need to end being able to conclude that you completely agree/disagree because it would be wrong to disagree/agree. Showing awareness of other interpretations is the way to access the top marks.If your answer is (3) then you need to basically do the same as above, but of course your conclusion will be somewhere in the middle. This requires that you agree for reasons but disagree for reasons y. Your cocnlusion is likely to look something like this:"In conclusion, whilst I agree that Bronte presents as a violent emotion, I also think it is shown to be tender at times, and that it is the relationship and balance between the violence and tenderness of love and other aspects of the novel which allow Bronte to use the theme of love so powerfully."The points which I have vaguely addressed in that conclusion would have to have been argued for throughout the essay. I find a good way to pan out these arguments is to write a brief plan which includes an introduction/conclusion so that you know what you want to argue for, and then to list the relevant points and order them into a structure which will argue for your stance.So, things to remember:Agree/Disagree/Somewhere between.Consider both sides of the argument.Always explain why your side of the argument wins out -- in every paragraph.Introduce and conclude your answer very clearly (the argumentation is in the body).

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3 years ago

16666 views

What is the difference between what is presented and how it is presented?

This is a big question at GCSE literature, because there is a heavy focus on both interpretation and method. The difference between what is presented and how it is presented is just identifying the literary features which create the effect you are discussing. This sounds a bit complex, but we can break it down into smaller steps:You can identify the two questions as separate -- what is it presentin, and how is it being done -- and you probably won't have too much trouble answering the first part -- saying what is being presented.Now, the way to adress the second part -- how it is presented -- is to simply ask yourself how do I know this?Sounds easy, right? I know it isn't always as easy that, but it's a really good place to start. Look at the text in question, and just circle or highlight the bits that give you the impression that is your answer to the first part of the question.Now, with some revision, you'll have learned some techniques and methods which writers use to portray things. The thing to do next is to look at your highlighted words, phrases or sections, and identify the techniques being demonstrated in them. Make a note of this -- always annotate a text for your own reference.The final step is the one that gets the best marks. You must draw the connection between the two parts of your answer, very cearly, and state how the methods you identified create the effect you identified.This may sound difficult, but really all you've already done this, because you know they produce the effect. So, if you can quote the relevant word or phrase, identify the features or method, and say that they produce the effect, you've done very well already.This is a big question at GCSE literature, because there is a heavy focus on both interpretation and method. The difference between what is presented and how it is presented is just identifying the literary features which create the effect you are discussing. This sounds a bit complex, but we can break it down into smaller steps:You can identify the two questions as separate -- what is it presentin, and how is it being done -- and you probably won't have too much trouble answering the first part -- saying what is being presented.Now, the way to adress the second part -- how it is presented -- is to simply ask yourself how do I know this?Sounds easy, right? I know it isn't always as easy that, but it's a really good place to start. Look at the text in question, and just circle or highlight the bits that give you the impression that is your answer to the first part of the question.Now, with some revision, you'll have learned some techniques and methods which writers use to portray things. The thing to do next is to look at your highlighted words, phrases or sections, and identify the techniques being demonstrated in them. Make a note of this -- always annotate a text for your own reference.The final step is the one that gets the best marks. You must draw the connection between the two parts of your answer, very cearly, and state how the methods you identified create the effect you identified.This may sound difficult, but really all you've already done this, because you know they produce the effect. So, if you can quote the relevant word or phrase, identify the features or method, and say that they produce the effect, you've done very well already.

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3 years ago

1632 views

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