Joseph D. GCSE French tutor, GCSE German tutor, A Level French tutor,...
£18 - £20 /hr

Joseph D.

Degree: Modern languages with European Studies (French and German) (Bachelors) - Bath University

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About me

About Me:

I study French and German with European Studies at the University of Bath. I have always been hugely passionate about the technicality and grace of languages, and I’d love to help you feel the same way.

I am incredibly patient and never become frustrated. I also completely adapt my tutoring methods to your learning requirements, for example you may be a more kinesthetic learner than a read-listen learner.

I was Head Boy at my school, and in serving my school community I assisted in classrooms, and tutored in French and German. As a result I have experience in tutoring students at levels and of all abilities.

The Tutorials:

What we cover during the tutorials is entirely up to you, whether it’s about grammar, writing technique, listening skills, exam advice or speaking practice (or all of the above), I am here to help!

After I’ve explained the topic/area of the language that you wanted to learn about, and after I have answered any questions you have, I will then ask you to demonstrate your understanding so that you are confident with what you have learned. This can be in the form of a quiz, a game or even you explaining the topic back to me.

I aim to make the lessons as fun and as relaxed as possible, as this is when you are most engaged. You will be surprised at how much you can learn in one tutorial!

The Next Step…

If I can be of any service to you, send me a 'Message in a Bottle' or book a 'Meet the Tutor Session', both of which can be done through this website. Just tell me what you want to learn, at what level you are studying and which exam board you are using.

Hopefully I will speak to you soon!

Subjects offered

SubjectLevelMy prices
French A Level £20 /hr
German A Level £20 /hr
French GCSE £18 /hr
German GCSE £18 /hr

Qualifications

QualificationLevelGrade
FrenchA-LevelA
GermanA-LevelA
GeographyA-LevelB
Disclosure and Barring Service

CRB/DBS Standard

No

CRB/DBS Enhanced

No

Ratings and reviews

5from 4 customer reviews

Izzy (Student) October 7 2016

Izzy (Student) September 29 2016

Augustus (Parent) May 3 2016

Jonathan (Student) May 3 2016

Questions Joseph has answered

Are there any tricks that can help me learn the gender of nouns in German?

In German, all nouns are masculine (der), feminine (die), neuter (das) or plural (die). On the whole you need to learn the genders individually, however there some guidelines that can help you.. Nouns that are masculine by meaning - Male people, e.g. der Artz, der Vater - Seasons, months an...

In German, all nouns are masculine (der), feminine (die), neuter (das) or plural (die).

On the whole you need to learn the genders individually, however there some guidelines that can help you..

Nouns that are masculine by meaning

- Male people, e.g. der Artz, der Vater

- Seasons, months and days of the week, e.g. der Juni, der Freitag, der Winter

- Cardinal directions (e.g. North, South, East, West), e.g. der Norden

Nouns that are feminine by meaning

- Female people, e.g. die Frau, die Mutter

- Most trees, flowes and fruits, e.g. eine Ananas

Nouns that are neuter by meaning

- Young people and animals, e.g. das Baby, das Kind, das Ferkel (piglet)

- Hotels, cafes, restaurants and cinemas, e.g. das Ritz, das Café Rouge, das Cineworld, etc

- Names of continents, countries and towns, e.g. das Afrika, das Frankreich (France), etc

Nouns that are masculine by ending

- Nouns that end in -el; -en; -er; -ig; -ich; -ling; -and; -ant; -ar; -är; -ast; -ent; -ier; -ist; -ismus; -or; -us are normally masculine

Nouns that are feminine by ending

- Nouns that end in -age; -e; -ei; -heit; -keit; -schaft; -ie; -ek; -eke; -ik; -in; -ion; -tät, -ung, -ur are normally feminine

Nouns that are neuter by ending

- Nouns that end in -tum; -ment; -ium; -um; -ett are normally neuter

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9 months ago

227 views

How do you construct the past tense in French?

Unlike in the English past tense, the French have two auxiliary 'helping' verbs - avoir and être, these become before the past participle, e.g. descendu. For example, j'ai mangé, and je suis allé. So as you can see here, the structure is 'who has done it (subject) + helping verb (auxiliary) +...

Unlike in the English past tense, the French have two auxiliary 'helping' verbs - avoir and être, these become before the past participle, e.g. descendu. For example, j'ai mangé, and je suis allé.

So as you can see here, the structure is 'who has done it (subject) + helping verb (auxiliary) + second verb (past participle)'

These auxiliaries are formed as follows

subject      avoir       être      

je              ai            suis

tu              as           es

il/elle/on     a            est

nous          avons      sommes

vous          avez        êtes

ils/elles      ont           sont

Which one of these you use depends on the verb that follows/the past participle, for example a minority of 'moving' verbs mean that you must use être, e.g. je suis... These can be remembered using the anacronym DR & MRS VANDERTRAMP, they are:

Devenir - to become

Revenir - to come back

&

Monter - to climb

Rester - to stay

Sortir - to go out

Venir - to come

Aller - to go

Naître - to be born

Descendre - to descend

Entrer - to enter

Rentrer - to return

Tomber - to fall

Retourner - to return

Arriver - to arrive

Mourir - to die

Partir - to leave

All other verbs require the use of avoir as the helping verb/auxiliary.

The second verb/past participle, e.g. venir, manger, etc, are formed from the infinitive (as you find them in the dictionary) as follows:

Verbs ending in -er (e.g. manger) lose the -er and add an -é; e.g. mangé

Verbs ending in -ir (e.g. partir) lose the -ir and add an -i; e.g. parti

Verbs ending in -re (e.g. rendre) lose the -re and add an -u; e.g. rendu

verbs ending in -oir (e.g. voir) lose the -oir and add an -u; e.g. vu

The final step to forming the past is that only DR & MRS VANDERTRAMP verbs must take an agreement - additional letter(s) - of gender and quantity depending on who has done the verb. For example

gender          singular           plural

masculine     - (no addition)   - s

feminine       - e                   - es

e.g. elle est allée (added e because subject is feminine); Marie et Claire sont descendues (added es because subjects are both feminine; Marc et Tom ont devenus (just the addition of an s because whilst there are two subjects, neither are feminine)

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9 months ago

266 views

What is the difference between pro-natalist policies and anti-natalist policies?

A natalist policy is a scheme or law that a government may adopt in order to control their population.  This is usually carried out by incentives - money or material goods that are given to families if they have below or above a certain number of children. An example of a pro-natalist policy,...

A natalist policy is a scheme or law that a government may adopt in order to control their population. 

This is usually carried out by incentives - money or material goods that are given to families if they have below or above a certain number of children.

An example of a pro-natalist policy, which encourages higher birthrates, is Singapore. Singapore pushed a campaign in 1988 offering 12 weeks maternity leave for mothers of 4+ children, posters and slogans - 'have 3 or more!', and offered larger and larger child benefits for each child a family had.

This was due to a fall in birthrate due to men and women deciding not to have families, and persue a careers instead.

An example of an anti-natalist policy, which encourages families to have fewer children, is the famous 'one-child policy' in China, introduced in 1978-1980. This was encouraged rather forcefully by the Chinese government, forcing women to have abortions if they already had a child. However there were financial benefits for families who kept to the one-child policy.

This was implemented to control the rapidly growing Chinese population.

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9 months ago

925 views
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