Liam M. A Level Chemistry tutor, A Level Biology tutor, GCSE Biology ...

Liam M.

Currently unavailable: until 01/06/2016

Degree: Pharmacy (Masters) - Bath University

MyTutor guarantee

Contact Liam
Send a message

All contact details will be kept confidential.

To give you a few options, we can ask three similar tutors to get in touch. More info.

Contact Liam

About me

I am a Pharmacy student at the University of Bath. I am crazy for science and I hope my passion can help you to succeed while enjoying learning.

The tutor sessions will be personalised for you. What you don't understand or what you need clarified is what we will spend the majority of the session on. The purpose is to build your confidence so no matter what question you are asked on a specific topic, you will have a good understanding so that you can answer confidently and concisely.

If you have any questions or want to book a session, you can send me a webmail or book a "meet the tutor" session.

I hope to hear from you soon!

Subjects offered

SubjectLevelMy prices
Biology A Level £20 /hr
Chemistry A Level £20 /hr
Biology GCSE £18 /hr

Qualifications

QualificationLevelGrade
ChemistryA-LevelB
BiologyA-LevelA
MathsA-LevelA
GermanA-LevelA
Disclosure and Barring Service

CRB/DBS Standard

No

CRB/DBS Enhanced

No

Currently unavailable: until

01/06/2016

Questions Liam has answered

What is a mole?

A mole is a unit of measurement for the amount of a substance. One mole is 6.02 x 10^23 particles in a substance, known as Avogadro's constant. This is because this is the number of atoms in  12g of Carbon- 12(the relative atomic mass of the carbon atoms). The molar mass is always equal to the...

A mole is a unit of measurement for the amount of a substance. One mole is 6.02 x 10^23 particles in a substance, known as Avogadro's constant. This is because this is the number of atoms in  12g of Carbon- 12(the relative atomic mass of the carbon atoms). The molar mass is always equal to the atomic mass of an atom, for example 1 mole of oxygen is equal to 16 grams.

see more

9 months ago

224 views

What is a mutation and what are the consequences of one?

A mutation is a change in the genetic composition of the DNA. It is often caused by an accidental insertion, deletion or swapping of a single base however whole genes can also move. SNPs, or single nucleotide polymorphisms, are the most common type of mutations. They mostly occur in the non-c...

A mutation is a change in the genetic composition of the DNA. It is often caused by an accidental insertion, deletion or swapping of a single base however whole genes can also move.

SNPs, or single nucleotide polymorphisms, are the most common type of mutations. They mostly occur in the non-coding region of DNA however they can occur in the coding region, within genes. This can sometimes be harmless, if that part of the DNA still codes for the same amino acid in a protein but if it codes for a different amino acid, it can change the shape and therefore the function of the protein. Sickle Cell anaemia is one of the most well known diseases caused by an SNP. SNP's are an example of a point mutation

Mutations can be caused by chemicals, radiation by natural causes.

see more

9 months ago

211 views

What is an enzyme?

An enzyme is known as a biological catalyst. This is because they can speed up reactions by providing an alternative pathway, lowering the activation energy of the reaction. They are normally composed of a protein and a non protein (co-factor). The enzyme has an active site, where the substrat...

An enzyme is known as a biological catalyst. This is because they can speed up reactions by providing an alternative pathway, lowering the activation energy of the reaction. They are normally composed of a protein and a non protein (co-factor). The enzyme has an active site, where the substrate/reactant binds. Enzymes are substrate specific; you can think of this like a "Lock and Key". Only a certain substrate can bind to the active site, just as only a certain key can fit into a lock. Enzymes can be denatured ( their shape changes and the active site no longer works as it it also a different shape) by changing the pH or the temperature of where you find the enzyme.

see more

9 months ago

215 views
See all answers
Send a message

All contact details will be kept confidential.

To give you a few options, we can ask three similar tutors to get in touch. More info.

Contact Liam

Still comparing tutors?

How do we connect with a tutor?

Where are they based?

How much does tuition cost?

How do tutorials work?

Cookies:

We use cookies to improve our service. By continuing to use this website, we'll assume that you're OK with this. Dismiss

mtw:mercury1:status:ok