Marc L. A Level Chemistry tutor

Marc L.

£24 /hr

Currently unavailable: for new students

Studying: Chemistry (Masters) - Durham University

4.8
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29 reviews| 41 completed tutorials

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About me

I'm enthusiastic because I love the wonder of chemistry, but I'm patient and understanding because I remember the drudgery of A-level. I'm compassionate and friendly as a tutor because that's what it takes to bridge the gap between the two. Ultimately, you decide what we cover in our sessions. However, I offer a range of lesson formats. In addition to complete tutelage in a whole curriculum for A-level chemistry, I'm happy to give a short crash course to improve confidence, have your questions answered to iron out the details, or cover preparatory material to get ahead of the competition before A-level year.I'm enthusiastic because I love the wonder of chemistry, but I'm patient and understanding because I remember the drudgery of A-level. I'm compassionate and friendly as a tutor because that's what it takes to bridge the gap between the two. Ultimately, you decide what we cover in our sessions. However, I offer a range of lesson formats. In addition to complete tutelage in a whole curriculum for A-level chemistry, I'm happy to give a short crash course to improve confidence, have your questions answered to iron out the details, or cover preparatory material to get ahead of the competition before A-level year.

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Ratings & Reviews

4.8from 29 customer reviews
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Ben (Student)

June 9 2017

Extremely helpful and good at teaching

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Sarah (Parent)

November 3 2016

My son said it was VERY VERY helpful to go over the topic with Marc when he was halfway though it at school.

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Sarah (Parent)

July 28 2016

Marc made my son feel at easy which allowed him to focus on the subject.

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Sarah (Parent)

June 6 2017

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Qualifications

SubjectQualificationGrade
ChemistryA-level (A2)A*
PhysicsA-level (A2)A*
MathematicsA-level (A2)A*
HistoryA-level (A2)A*

General Availability

Before 12pm12pm - 5pmAfter 5pm
mondays
tuesdays
wednesdays
thursdays
fridays
saturdays
sundays

Subjects offered

SubjectQualificationPrices
ChemistryA Level£24 /hr

Questions Marc has answered

When composing a mechanism in organic chemistry, how do I use curly arrows?

There are a few things to learn about the use of curly arrows. Once you've grasped the basics, though, you'll be able to use them with simplicity and clarity no matter how complicated the mechanism is!

The first thing to remember is that the arrow should start on something which represents a pair of electrons. This is most commonly either a lone pair of electrons, or a filled π orbital in a double bond. This is to say that the arrow starts off where the electrons start off.

The second thing is that the arrow-head should point to the place where the electrons are going. If the electrons are forming a new bond, they will be shared between two atoms, and so the arrow-head should point between the two atoms. In short, the arrow ends up where the electrons end up.

As with any other concept in chemistry, the best strategy to master curly arrows is practice! Always remember that clarity is key when composing a mechanism, so draw the structure which best avoids confusion.

There are a few things to learn about the use of curly arrows. Once you've grasped the basics, though, you'll be able to use them with simplicity and clarity no matter how complicated the mechanism is!

The first thing to remember is that the arrow should start on something which represents a pair of electrons. This is most commonly either a lone pair of electrons, or a filled π orbital in a double bond. This is to say that the arrow starts off where the electrons start off.

The second thing is that the arrow-head should point to the place where the electrons are going. If the electrons are forming a new bond, they will be shared between two atoms, and so the arrow-head should point between the two atoms. In short, the arrow ends up where the electrons end up.

As with any other concept in chemistry, the best strategy to master curly arrows is practice! Always remember that clarity is key when composing a mechanism, so draw the structure which best avoids confusion.

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1 year ago

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