Jonathan W. A Level Computing tutor, A Level French tutor, GCSE Maths...

Jonathan W.

Currently unavailable: for regular students

Degree: Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence (Bachelors) - Birmingham University

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About me

About Me:

I am a Computer Science And Artificial Intelligence student at the University of Birmingham. I am really in love with my subject- which involves a lot of maths, as well as computing- and I enjoy teaching other people about these two subjects. I will make sure that you fully understand whatever confuses you. I am patient, friendly, and enthusiastic- I've been teaching basic guitar lessons to children since I was 13, which greatly helped with my one-on-one communication skills. Nothing makes me smile like a student who is progressing. I will ensure that you do progress, and I hope you enjoy yourself along the way. Having two English teachers as parents, I have learnt many things about how to teach, how to tackle challenges, and how to ensure that the tuttee is progressing.

I have lived my entire life in France- up until now. I went to an international school where I did the OIB: The International Option of the Baccalaureat. I studied the French educational curriculum, as well as A-level English and AS-level Maths. Our school's English departments allowed us to follow the British curriculum in these two subjects, and also gave us the chance to sit several British exams: such as certain GCSEs, AS Maths and A-level English. I believe that learning Maths and Computing in French really gave me a different perspective, and possibly a more meticulous approach to maths. And hey- what better way to learn French than to interact with someone who's fluent in the language, am I right?!

The Tutoring Time

Whatever you want to cover, I will cover. The main aim of these sessions is to make you progress, to enhance your skills, and to make you understand what you couldn't on your own. I also want to pass on my love for computing- as a first year Computer Scientist, I love the challenges that programming can bring; and I hope you can share the same enthusiasm. Frustration and anger is something that we will try do avoid, as we will learn together in a relaxed, chilled environment. And if you do get frustrated- hey, that's why I'm here.

So what are you waiting for? Let's turn some tables around and make you enjoy the subjects you're struggling in!
I look forward to seeing you!

Subjects offered

SubjectLevelMy prices
Computing A Level £20 /hr
French A Level £20 /hr
Computing GCSE £18 /hr
Maths GCSE £18 /hr

Qualifications

QualificationLevelGrade
MathsBaccalaureate19/20
Physics-ChemistryBaccalaureate17/20
Biology Baccalaureate15/20
GermanBaccalaureate20/20
English LiteratureA-LevelA*
Sports Baccalaureate17/20
PhilosophyBaccalaureate12/20
ComputingBaccalaureate17/20
History-GeographyBaccalaureate15/20
French Baccalaureate17/20
Disclosure and Barring Service

CRB/DBS Standard

No

CRB/DBS Enhanced

No

Currently unavailable: for regular students

Ratings and reviews

5from 1 customer review

Mursalina (Parent) April 17 2016

It was a good lesson

Questions Jonathan has answered

How do we solve simultaneous equations, say for example x + 4y = 20 and 2x - 2y = 10 ?

When it comes to simultaneous equations, there are two methods that we can use to solve them. The first method is called substitution, where we make one of the variables the subject in one of our equations and "plug it" into the other equation. For our example, we have : (1) x + 4y = 20 and ...

When it comes to simultaneous equations, there are two methods that we can use to solve them. The first method is called substitution, where we make one of the variables the subject in one of our equations and "plug it" into the other equation. For our example, we have :

(1) x + 4y = 20

and

(2) 2x - 2y = 10 

We'll take equation (2) and make x the subject of it. We would first add 2y on either side of the equals sign to get rid of it on the left side:

2x = 10 +2y

We now nearly have an equation where the subject is x; all we need to do is divide it by 2.

x = 5 + y

Now all we need to do is plug this equation into equation (1), therefore substituting x with y + 5:

(y +5) + 4y = 20

We then solve this like any other equation:

5y = 15

y =3

We've now found y! But it's not over just yet! Don't forget we also have to find x! For this, we just put in y's value into one of our equations and then solve it:

x + 4*3 = 20

x + 12 = 20

x = 8

And now we've also found x! Yay! To check if your answers are right, you can change the values of x and y in our equations, and you will see that we get the correct results!

There is another method to solve simultaneous equations, called elimination. In this method, we want to make the coefficient of one of the variables the same in both equations. We then substract one equation from the other, thus eliminating the variable with the same coefficient. If this seems a little confusing, let's take our two equations again: 

(1) x + 4y = 20 

(2) 2x - 2y = 10 

What we can do is multiply (1) by 2, giving us:

2x + 8y = 40

We then substract both equations:

2*(1) - (2) : 2x + 8y -(2x -2y) = 40 -10

(Note that we have - (-2y), which in the end gives us +2y)

2*(1) -(2) : 10y = 30

y = 3

Yay, we found y again! And now, we just have to slip our y into one of our equations to find that the value of x is 8. Not too bad, is it?

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9 months ago

280 views

What is the difference between an array and an ArrayList in Java?

An array is a way of storing information, which can vary from simple integers to strings and characters. In everyday life, we would probably call this a list. A traditional array of integers in java is defined like so: int[] myArray = new int[3]; Here we have declared an integer array of size...

An array is a way of storing information, which can vary from simple integers to strings and characters. In everyday life, we would probably call this a list. A traditional array of integers in java is defined like so:

int[] myArray = new int[3];

Here we have declared an integer array of size 3. The size of an array in Java is immutable; this means that myArray can only ever hold 3 items. If I then wanted to add the number 3 in the first position, I would simply do:

myArray[0] = 3;

If we then deleted 3 from our array, the size of the array would stay the same. We are simply deleting the value at position 0, not the position itself. 

An ArrayList is Java's answer to "mutable" arrays. We don't need to define a length when we instantiate them, and we can add as many elements as we want: the size of the array grows or shrinks. We declare an ArrayList of strings like so:

ArrayList myArrayList = new ArrayList();

We then have several methods, such as add(), remove(), or size(), which allow us to manipulate the ArrayList. To get an element from the array at a certain position, we use its get() method:

myArrayList.get(index);

Overall, we would use simple arrays when we have a pre-defined length for our array, and we know that the number of items we want to add won't surpass this length. ArrayLists are ways of getting around that, and therefore allow more flexibility. One last difference to notice between these two data types: ArrayList cannot store primitive data types. ArrayLists can only store objects, such as strings. Since Java 5, autoboxing was introduced which allowed you to add primitve types, such as integers, to ArrayLists; but they are in fact converting them into objects. So think carefully about your problem before you choose which version of the array you would like to use!

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9 months ago

255 views

When should we use the imperfect tense or the simple past tense?

Both of these tenses are past tense; however, we usually use them for different scenarios whenever talking about the past. The imperfect tense is generally used to describe something which is usual, or happens often. An example would be: Quand il faisait froid, il n'oubliait pas de mettre ses...

Both of these tenses are past tense; however, we usually use them for different scenarios whenever talking about the past. The imperfect tense is generally used to describe something which is usual, or happens often. An example would be:

Quand il faisait froid, il n'oubliait pas de mettre ses gants.

The simple past tense, or "passé composé", is used to describe an action that was done once in the past, something that is finished. 

Il a mis ses gants en sortant de sa maison.

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9 months ago

231 views
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