Angus L. 13 plus  Science tutor, GCSE Physics tutor, Mentoring -Perso...

Angus L.

Currently unavailable: for regular students

Computer Science and Physics (Bachelors) - Edinburgh University

5.0
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5 reviews

6 completed lessons

Message Angus

About me

About Me

I am a computer science and physics student at the University of Edinburgh who loves explaining science the way I wish it had been explained to me.

As a former ski coach and camp councillor from Canada, I have experience teaching concepts to children from the ages of 8 to 17. I am patient, a self-proclaimed physics nerd, and have a good sense of humour (also self-proclaimed). In high school I was part of a calculus tutoring scheme where I helped my peers understand ideas taught in the classroom. I am no stranger to being on the receiving end of a tutorial and I hope to instill in others what my favourite tutors instilled in me: a genuine interest for the topics I study.

The Sessions

I appreciate different learning styles and have the tools necessary to approach teaching through a variety of means: whether it’s a detailed description of some phenomenon or a more visual explanation, I can accommodate for everyone’s preferences. Most importantly, I think analogies are key to understanding concepts, which - as the great explainer Richard Feynman emphasized - is the only way to learn anything in the long-term. Oh and I’ll keep things fun too.

About Me

I am a computer science and physics student at the University of Edinburgh who loves explaining science the way I wish it had been explained to me.

As a former ski coach and camp councillor from Canada, I have experience teaching concepts to children from the ages of 8 to 17. I am patient, a self-proclaimed physics nerd, and have a good sense of humour (also self-proclaimed). In high school I was part of a calculus tutoring scheme where I helped my peers understand ideas taught in the classroom. I am no stranger to being on the receiving end of a tutorial and I hope to instill in others what my favourite tutors instilled in me: a genuine interest for the topics I study.

The Sessions

I appreciate different learning styles and have the tools necessary to approach teaching through a variety of means: whether it’s a detailed description of some phenomenon or a more visual explanation, I can accommodate for everyone’s preferences. Most importantly, I think analogies are key to understanding concepts, which - as the great explainer Richard Feynman emphasized - is the only way to learn anything in the long-term. Oh and I’ll keep things fun too.

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Ratings & Reviews

5from 5 customer reviews
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M (Parent from Pinner)

May 6 2016

Great session again

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M (Parent from Pinner)

April 29 2016

Very good

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M (Parent from Pinner)

May 20 2016

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Nate (Student)

April 13 2016

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Qualifications

SubjectQualificationGrade
PhysicsInternational Baccalaureate (IB)93%
CalculusInternational Baccalaureate (IB)98%
EnglishInternational Baccalaureate (IB)90%
ChemistryInternational Baccalaureate (IB)94%
PhilosophyInternational Baccalaureate (IB)90%
FrenchInternational Baccalaureate (IB)96%
Instrumental MusicInternational Baccalaureate (IB)94%
BiologyInternational Baccalaureate (IB)95%

Subjects offered

SubjectQualificationPrices
MathsGCSE£18 /hr
PhysicsGCSE£18 /hr
Science13 Plus£18 /hr
-Personal Statements-Mentoring£22 /hr

Questions Angus has answered

How can you find the integral of x^-1

The traditional rule for integration of a variable raised to a power is to raise the power by 1 and divide the answer by that new exponent. However, this rule leads to an answer of x^0 = 1, which can't be right. It's not. The integral of x^-1 = 1/x is the natural logarithm of x, or lnx. Likewise, the derivative of lnx is x^-1, and this is an especially important rule to remember for things like differential equations in the future. 

The traditional rule for integration of a variable raised to a power is to raise the power by 1 and divide the answer by that new exponent. However, this rule leads to an answer of x^0 = 1, which can't be right. It's not. The integral of x^-1 = 1/x is the natural logarithm of x, or lnx. Likewise, the derivative of lnx is x^-1, and this is an especially important rule to remember for things like differential equations in the future. 

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2 years ago

820 views

How fast are geostationary satellites moving?

From a Newtonian perspective, the equation for the speed of a satellite in circular orbit around the Earth at a radius r can be derived by equating centripetal acceleration to the acceleration due to gravity so that the speed v is the square root of the gravitational constant times the mass of Earth, divided by r. This v depends on the r, but the radius of an object in geostationary circular orbit around Earth can be determined by substituting 'two times pi, divided by the period' for the speed. Since the period of Earth's rotation, along with its mass are all known values, you can find the radius and plug that into your first equation to solve for the speed.

From a Newtonian perspective, the equation for the speed of a satellite in circular orbit around the Earth at a radius r can be derived by equating centripetal acceleration to the acceleration due to gravity so that the speed v is the square root of the gravitational constant times the mass of Earth, divided by r. This v depends on the r, but the radius of an object in geostationary circular orbit around Earth can be determined by substituting 'two times pi, divided by the period' for the speed. Since the period of Earth's rotation, along with its mass are all known values, you can find the radius and plug that into your first equation to solve for the speed.

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2 years ago

831 views

Why does water expand when it gets cold while metals contract?

The temperature of a substance is a measure of the average kinetic energy (energy of movement) of the molecules within it. When molecules have less kinetic energy, they are moving slower on average and thus the effect of collisions between molecules is decreased. This allows them to stay closer to each other. Therefore, in most cases - as with metal - a decrease in temperature causes objects to shrink, or contract. However, when water freezes it undergoes a state change; that is, it turns into a solid: ice. This solid is less dense (the molecules have lots of space between each other) than the liquid form of water because the molecules form a crystalline structure when they freeze, similar to what you'd see in a snowflake. A lower density means that the molecules take up more space and therefore, water expands when it turns into ice.

The temperature of a substance is a measure of the average kinetic energy (energy of movement) of the molecules within it. When molecules have less kinetic energy, they are moving slower on average and thus the effect of collisions between molecules is decreased. This allows them to stay closer to each other. Therefore, in most cases - as with metal - a decrease in temperature causes objects to shrink, or contract. However, when water freezes it undergoes a state change; that is, it turns into a solid: ice. This solid is less dense (the molecules have lots of space between each other) than the liquid form of water because the molecules form a crystalline structure when they freeze, similar to what you'd see in a snowflake. A lower density means that the molecules take up more space and therefore, water expands when it turns into ice.

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2 years ago

1091 views

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