Megan S. Uni Admissions Test -Personal Statements- tutor, 11 Plus Eng...
£20 - £25 /hr

Megan S.

Degree: HSPS (Politics and International Relations) (Bachelors) - Cambridge University

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About me

I am a Masters student in International Relations at the University of York, having graduated from the University of Cambridge earlier this year with a 2.1. As well as my love for politics, I have a passion for literature, and have been teaching English for over four years, both tutoring privately and in classes of up to 25 students. For all those people out there who hate analysing poetry more than anything in the world, maybe my enthusiasm and my ability explain things in less flowery language can help! I have taught students from the age of five all the way up to adults, so I know how to cater to your specific needs and I believe I can make the class interesting, as well as educational, for you.

I have also applied to university for an undergraduate degree twice, in 2011 and 2012, after I realised that I wanted to take a gap year. This means I have double the experience in putting together university applications, writing personal statements and preparing for interviews. I would love to help you if this is the stage that you're currently at. Having applied to Cambridge in both years, and volunteered in helping out during the interviews once already here, I also have a lot of experience in the specific Oxbridge experience.

Not only do I have experience teaching, but I also gained a leadership qualification with Girl Guiding, where I volunteered for four years. I have loved both of these activities because teaching encapsulates all of my best qualities: I am patient, enthusiastic and don't take myself too seriously, which means that I can enjoy watching students progress and know that they aren't hating every second!

Subjects offered

SubjectLevelMy prices
English Language GCSE £20 /hr
English Literature GCSE £20 /hr
Government and Politics GCSE £20 /hr
Politics GCSE £20 /hr
-Personal Statements- Mentoring £22 /hr

Qualifications

QualificationLevelGrade
English LiteratureBaccalaureate7
HistoryBaccalaureate7
PsychologyBaccalaureate6
BiologyBaccalaureate7
SpanishBaccalaureate6
MathsBaccalaureate6
Disclosure and Barring Service

CRB/DBS Standard

No

CRB/DBS Enhanced

02/12/2013

Ratings and reviews

5from 24 customer reviews

Tayyiba (Student) December 2 2016

very helpful and kind, gives good detail and explains information very clearly

Amie (Parent) May 22 2016

good

Amie (Parent) May 14 2016

great

Amie (Parent) May 2 2016

Megan is a patient, enthusiastic and responsible tutor. She is always well-organised for every lesson and send you feedback straight away on the review page. As parents, we are easy to access the progress of our son. As a student, he can remind himself the good side and the weak side. I definitely recommend Megan, a five-star tutor to parents and students.
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Questions Megan has answered

How can I write a personal statement that doesn't sound arrogant?

This is something that everyone will struggle with: writing 4000 characters about how great you are will inevitably feel a bit awkward. The key is to be confident, but not cocky. You can do this in two ways. Firstly, if you are writing about a particular skill or quality that you have, back i...

This is something that everyone will struggle with: writing 4000 characters about how great you are will inevitably feel a bit awkward. The key is to be confident, but not cocky. You can do this in two ways.

Firstly, if you are writing about a particular skill or quality that you have, back it up. By justifying your statement that you have 'an aptitude for languages', for example, it's no longer a bold and overconfident claim, but a true fact about you. Provide the evidence by telling them about how you won that award from school last year, for example, or how you had the initiative to do a project of your own at home. Each characteristic, such as 'good at time management' or 'excellent at working in groups', should have a justification to it. Respectively, doing the International Baccalaureate might have demonstrated how you can juggle six subjects at once, or being a member of the football team might show your enthusiasm to collaborate with others.

Alternatively, you could show how the skills you have now aren't simply natural ability, but instead a progression over months or years, preferably which you have actively driven yourself. If possible, your personal statement should definitely not take the form of a list of achievements: universities will be more interested  in the journey you took to get there, because that will show what sort of person you are. For example, if you are now an active member of the debating society, is this something you have always enjoyed? Maybe it was the case that you used to struggle with public speaking, but you decided to push your boundaries and by forcing yourself into a temporarily uncomfortable position, you have found something that you love and are good at.

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9 months ago

240 views

Where do I even start in writing a commentary for unseen poetry?

Getting a page of poetry you’ve never seen before is daunting, and especially when you’re under time pressure, it’s easy to get stressed. For this very reason, it’s necessary to just take a few minutes to properly read the poem. Read it once, and I would even recommend that you read it again. ...

Getting a page of poetry you’ve never seen before is daunting, and especially when you’re under time pressure, it’s easy to get stressed. For this very reason, it’s necessary to just take a few minutes to properly read the poem. Read it once, and I would even recommend that you read it again. From this, try to extract what exactly the poem is trying to say; if you had to condense its meaning into a single sentence, what is the poet actually talking about? Once you’ve established this, it’s time to move onto wider themes. Nature, religion, love and death are probably some of the most common examples, so if you’re really stuck, they are a good place to start looking.

Now that you know what the poet’s message is, and the wider concepts being used to convey it, you can move onto the language being employed by the poet. Alliteration, personification, metaphors, similes, hyperboles, synaesthesia, onomatopoeia, allusions, symbolism and oxymorons are just some examples of what you should keep an eye out for.

Finally, don’t forget about structure and syntax. Even if a poem doesn’t have an obvious rhyming scheme to talk about, there will almost definitely be some kind of structural organization or use of technique. In the case of the former, your work should be cut out for you: there might be rhyming couplets which are adding emphasis to just those lines, for example, or maybe the whole poem has a rhyme scheme. If it doesn’t have any rhyme, don’t panic - there are still many other structural points you can make. Enjambment is just one example, where there is a lack of punctuation and the line runs over into the next.

The most important point with all of these techniques is that you don’t just list them. It is important to know the key vocabulary and be able to identify them in use, but what will get you the marks is if you can explain why it is being used. Does it contribute to the message of the poem, or engage with the themes you identified earlier? Does it affect the tone of the speaker? Have a thesis in your essay. For example, “Poet X is concerned with the theme of death, which is apparent through his use of winter as the setting of the poem. This nature imagery serves to remind the reader of the inevitability of mortality and provide a sombre tone”.

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9 months ago

222 views
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