Madeleine S. A Level French tutor, GCSE French tutor, GCSE History tu...

Madeleine S.

Currently unavailable: for regular students

Degree: Law with French (Bachelors) - Bristol University

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About me

About Me:

I am a Law and French student at Bristol University. From a young age I have always loved all things French, especially speaking, and I have just finished my year abroad in Bordeaux. My passion for history has also been there from a young age. Law with seemed a logical step for a student with these interests, as the law is based on how society has developed over time (aka history). My subject interests were also largely inspired by teachers so I hope that my tutorials will instill that love in you, too. 

I am very friendly and enthusiastic, and I have a lot of experience working with children, as I have au paired with french children, and was also a maths and french mentor whilst at school. I am also a keen musician and so have experiencing directing and improving group work.

The Sessions:

During the sessions, you will guide what we cover. Especially in French a basic understanding of the grammar principles and necessary vocabulary is key before you start with exam questions, so we will need to ensure that is there before you start.  In history as well, the knowledge has to be there before exam questions can be attempted. So tell me what you need to work on, and I we can work from there.

I will use as many different ways (many quizzes and practice exercises) as possible to explain a concept, until you are confident enough that you can explain it to me. I may even set you homework, or make quizzes for you so that you can practice grammar and learn vocabulary and facts easily in your own time!

For those studying A-level French, I would be more than happy to practice speaking with you, and even to conduct mock exams. 

I hope the sessions will be fun! A lot can be achieved in 55mins!

I'm applying to university... Can you help me?!

Yes! I have been through the UCAS application system so am very familiar with how stressful it can be. I would be happy to read through personal statements for any arts or law related subject. Even if the focus is more 'mathsy' or scientific, any proof-reading or second opinion is still useful!

What next?

If you have any questions, send me a 'WebMail' or book a 'Meet the Tutor Session'! (both accessible through this website). Remember to tell me your exam board, the topics you're studying (this is especially important for History students and cultural topics for French A-level students) and what you're struggling with.

I look forward to meeting you!

Subjects offered

SubjectLevelMy prices
French A Level £20 /hr
French GCSE £18 /hr
History GCSE £18 /hr
Law GCSE £18 /hr
-Personal Statements- Mentoring £20 /hr

Qualifications

QualificationLevelGrade
FrenchA-LevelA
HistoryA-LevelA*
MathsA-LevelA
LNATUni Admissions Test21/45
Disclosure and Barring Service

CRB/DBS Standard

19/06/2016

CRB/DBS Enhanced

No

Currently unavailable: for regular students

General Availability

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Please get in touch for more detailed availability

Questions Madeleine has answered

What is a possessive adjective?

A possessive adjective is something that is used in French to show WHO something or someone belongs to. In English the equivalent would be 'my', 'your'. So for example: 'My' bag. ('My' is the possessive adjective in this case).  In French, this would be 'mon' sac.  However, in French it gets...

A possessive adjective is something that is used in French to show WHO something or someone belongs to. In English the equivalent would be 'my', 'your'. So for example:

'My' bag. ('My' is the possessive adjective in this case). 

In French, this would be 'mon' sac. 

However, in French it gets a little more complicated, because of the fact that their nouns (aka their words which describe things, or people), are either MASCULINE, FEMININE or PLURAL. 

This means that when you use a possessive adjective, it has to AGREE with the noun you are describing.

So 'mon' sac uses the word 'mon', because 'sac' is MASCULINE.

In contrast, the word 'trousse' (pencilcase) is FEMININE. Therefore, if you wanted to say: 'my pencilcase,' you would have to use the feminine version of 'my', which is MA. 

Therefore, 'my pencilcase' becomes 'ma trousse.'

Another example of PLURAL use of a possessive adjective would be the following:

If you wanted to describe:

'my sweets', because the word sweets is PLURAL (aka, you have MULTIPLE SWEETS), you would have to use the possessive adjective 'MES.'

Therefore, 'my sweets' would become 'mes bonbons.' 

Take a look at this gcse bitesize table to help you out with all the different forms fo possessive adjectives! http://www.bbc.co.uk/schools/gcsebitesize/french/grammar/possessivead/possesiveadjectiverev1.shtml 

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5 months ago

206 views

What is the subjunctive?

The subjunctive is a mood used in French to express emotions or ideas which are uncertain or subjective. Examples include to express doubt, emotions or will/ wanting. There isn't really an English equivalent any more, except for the odd few phrases, such as 'If I were' rather than 'if I was.'...

The subjunctive is a mood used in French to express emotions or ideas which are uncertain or subjective. Examples include to express doubt, emotions or will/ wanting.

There isn't really an English equivalent any more, except for the odd few phrases, such as 'If I were' rather than 'if I was.' This is why English students find it particularly difficult to wrap their head around the concept, but unfortunately it can't be avoided because the French actually do use it all the time!

The subjunctive in French only appears either in the present tense, or in the past tense (passé composé), and has certain endings to match.

Another really important thing to remember is that the subjunctive very rarely appears without a 'trigger', and is therefore nearly always found in dependent clauses introduced by que or qui. For example: 'il faut que j'aille (present subjunctive of avoir), or 'je ne pense pas que je doive y aller' (present subjunctive of devoir). Unfortunately there is no shortcut to remembering the majority of these triggers, and they simply have to be learnt through study and endless practice! 

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9 months ago

187 views
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