Andrew P. GCSE Classical Greek tutor, 13 plus  Classical Greek tutor,...
£18 - £20 /hr

Andrew P.

Degree: Classics (Bachelors) - Oxford, St John's College University

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About me

Hello! I’m Andrew, currently in my second year studying Classics at St John’s College, Oxford. I’ve hugely benefitted from high-quality language teaching at university, and I’d love to pass on some of what I’ve learnt to younger students.

I tremendously enjoy studying Classics, and have a real enthusiasm for the Classical world. One of the best things about the subject is the opportunity for detailed study of brilliant texts in their original languages of Greek and Latin. But having started Greek at university, I also understand that learning an ancient language and beginning to read ancient literature can be challenging.

I’d like to help anyone studying Greek or Latin, and in the tutorials we can cover whatever the student is finding tricky – unseen translations, set texts, literature essays, grammar or syntax.

I hope that tutorials will be enjoyable, engaging and useful, and I’ll always seek to ensure that the student has a secure understanding of topics discussed. I also think it’s important for the student to know how to learn and revise aspects of language, and so I’ll endeavour to recommend resources and methods that I’ve used myself.

Most of all, I hope to inspire students with my enthusiasm for Classics!

If you have any questions, please let me know via a WebMail message, or book a Meet-the-Tutor session. Thanks for reading, and I look forward to meeting you!

Subjects offered

SubjectLevelMy prices
Latin A Level £20 /hr
Classical Greek GCSE £18 /hr
Latin GCSE £18 /hr
Classical Greek 13 Plus £18 /hr
Latin 13 Plus £18 /hr

Qualifications

QualificationLevelGrade
LatinA-LevelA
English LiteratureA-LevelA*
HistoryA-LevelA
Disclosure and Barring Service

CRB/DBS Standard

No

CRB/DBS Enhanced

No

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Questions Andrew has answered

How is the Latin future participle formed?

In Latin, the future participle literally means being about to X or on the point of doing X. It is active, and has the form: amaturus, amatura, amaturum The best way of spotting the future participle is to look for the -ur- extension (just like English future). It is formed from the supine (...

In Latin, the future participle literally means being about to X or on the point of doing X. It is active, and has the form:

amaturus, amatura, amaturum

The best way of spotting the future participle is to look for the -ur- extension (just like English future).

It is formed from the supine (4th principal part):

amo, amare, amavi, amatum --> amaturus -a -um

moneo, monere, monui, monitum --> moniturus -a -um

rego, regere, rexi, rectum --> recturus -a -um

audio, audire, audivi, auditum --> auditurus -a -um

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9 months ago

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How is αὐτος used in Greek?

The word αὐτος has three different meanings in Greek, depending on its case and the use of the definite article. 1) When the word agrees with an article + noun but is not sandwiched, it means himself/herself/itself/themselves. ὁ βασιλευς αὐτος = The king himself αὐτος ὁ πατηρ = The fat...

The word αὐτος has three different meanings in Greek, depending on its case and the use of the definite article.

1) When the word agrees with an article + noun but is not sandwiched, it means himself/herself/itself/themselves.

ὁ βασιλευς αὐτος = The king himself

αὐτος ὁ πατηρ = The father himself

The word also has this meaning when it appears on its own as a pronoun in the nominative:

αὐτη ἐφυγεν = She herself fled.

2) When the word agrees with an article + noun and is sandwiched, it means the same. This is always the meaning when a part of αὐτος comes immediately after the article.

τους αὐτους δουλους εἰδεν = He saw the same slaves.

3) When the word is used on its own as a pronoun and is not in the nominative, it means him/her/it/them. It is always third-person, and cannot come as the first word of a sentence or clause.

ὁ στρατηγος αὐτην εἰδεν = The general saw her.

ὁ ἀγγελος αὐτοις ἐπιστευεν = The messenger trusted them.

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9 months ago

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