Ewan D. GCSE English tutor, A Level History tutor, GCSE History tutor...

Ewan D.

Currently unavailable: for regular students

Degree: History (Bachelors) - Cambridge University

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About me

I'm Ewan, going into my final year studying History at Cambridge. I would love to help anyone seeking guidance on A-Level or GCSE History; or on university (including Oxbridge) applications for History.

Tutoring is a partnership. ​As with the people I have tutored previously, I want you to be honest with me. Let me know what you're struggling with, and we'll work on it. If you need help with some key skills at the beginning, I'll help you build on that. If you want to know how to push for the top grades, we'll go in depth.

I'm all about building confidence for the exams. In essay subjects, you need to get to a position where you can trust yourself to speculate under stressful conditions, to write things down that you might not have thought about before. I'll help you build that confidence by equipping you with the essential skills, mainly through looking at past papers. We won't just spend time on the stuff you're less comfortable with: harnessing the bits you're good at is just as important to feeling confident in yourself, which is how you get good grades.

If you'd like to know more, do get in contact for a free session. Thank you.

Subjects offered

SubjectLevelMy prices
History A Level £22 /hr
English GCSE £20 /hr
History GCSE £20 /hr
Politics GCSE £20 /hr
-Personal Statements- Mentoring £22 /hr

Qualifications

QualificationLevelGrade
HistoryA-LevelA*
EnglishA-LevelA*
PoliticsA-LevelA*
Disclosure and Barring Service

CRB/DBS Standard

No

CRB/DBS Enhanced

No

Currently unavailable: for regular students

General Availability

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Please get in touch for more detailed availability

Questions Ewan has answered

How should I approach a source-based exam?

Analysing sources is the part of A-Level History people tend to find most difficult. So you're not alone! Unlike with essay exams, it's pretty much impossible to question-spot and prepare an answer in advance to be replicated in the exam. But there's plenty of techniques you can use to get yo...

Analysing sources is the part of A-Level History people tend to find most difficult. So you're not alone!

Unlike with essay exams, it's pretty much impossible to question-spot and prepare an answer in advance to be replicated in the exam. But there's plenty of techniques you can use to get yourself ready.

The key is to give yourself time in the exam to read the sources thoroughly. It's stressful under timed conditions, and it's easy to jump straight in and start writing. But you will only understand the message of the source, its nuances, and start to forge comparisons with other sources if you plan in the exam. I'd leave at least 20-30% of the exam for this.

First, work out what the source is saying, its 'message'. Underline parts that are important. Second, once you've read through the sources the question asks you to address, read them again. This time, try and notice common themes between the sources, and link them to the question asked. Or, if the sources are radically different, note that too. Cross-referencing is what gets you top marks. Denote these themes by number, or by colour with highlighters.

When you come to writing your answer, examiners much prefer you to structure an essay by theme than by source, as it proves you're thinking about the question. Planning in this way will help you achieve this.

Whilst doing this, it's really important to consider the source's provenance, or who is writing or drawing it. You'll have encountered this at GCSE, but at A-Level you need to be more sophisticated in how you approach this. Think about the author's motives, as at GCSE. But think also about the year of the source, what might have been influencing them at this time. This is where your contextual knowledge is crucial. Then, most importantly, when you read the source for the second time, analyse whether this context has had any bearing on the source itself, on what is actually written.

You will only master all this if you have a go at lots of past papers. Even though the sources in the exam you sit will be different, the general techniques you develop are applicable. Contextual knowledge is important, but be careful not to over-burden yourself with facts, because most marks will come from source analysis. So focus instead on the sources and on analysis, and on structuring your timings in an exam very different to the ones you sat at GCSE. Good luck!

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5 months ago

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