Edward R. GCSE Maths tutor, A Level Maths tutor, Uni Admissions Test ...

Edward R.

Currently unavailable: for new students

Degree: Physics (Masters) - Oxford, St John's College University

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About me

About Me

I am an enthusiastic and approachable physics student at Oxford University. For as long as I can remember I have taken an active interest in science and maths, and I have always been keen to pass my enthusiasm onto others.

I am also a very sporty person, and have a wealth of teaching experience from coaching children as young as 4 to play tennis. I also spent a year tutoring maths A level to younger students whilst at sixth form college.

As a tutor I will always search for imaginitive and intuitive ways to help my students fully understand a topic which they are struggling with, with the aim that they should be able to explain the answer to me by the time we are finished. There will be a strong focus on student interaction in my tutorials to ensure that you are getting the most out of our time together.

Subjects Covered

I am currently offering tutoring for maths GCSE, as well as maths and further maths AS and A levels.

Oxford Physics Entrance Exam

As I recently sat and passed the 'PAT' test for admission into Oxford university I am able to offer tutorials on this subject. This could be particularly beneficial as there is a general lack of good online resources for preparing for this test.

What Now?

Please do get in touch through this website if you have any queries relating to my tutoring, and hopefully I will speak to you soon!

Subjects offered

SubjectLevelMy prices
Maths A Level £20 /hr
Physics A Level £20 /hr
Maths GCSE £18 /hr
Physics GCSE £18 /hr
.PAT. Uni Admissions Test £25 /hr

Qualifications

QualificationLevelGrade
PhysicsA-LevelA*
MathsA-LevelA*
Further MathsA-LevelA*
ChemistryA-LevelA
Oxford PATUni Admissions TestPass
Disclosure and Barring Service

CRB/DBS Standard

No

CRB/DBS Enhanced

No

Currently unavailable: for new students

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Questions Edward has answered

How do I solve the quadratic equation x^2+4x+3=0

When solving a quadratic equation like this it is useful to write it in the form (x+a)(x+b)=0, as this is simply saying 'two numbers multiplied together equal zero'. A general rule in maths is that whenever two numbers multiply together to equal zero, either one or both of those numbers equal ...

When solving a quadratic equation like this it is useful to write it in the form (x+a)(x+b)=0, as this is simply saying 'two numbers multiplied together equal zero'. A general rule in maths is that whenever two numbers multiply together to equal zero, either one or both of those numbers equal zero (try multiplying any number you can think of by zero and see what you get!)

The next question is how do I write x^2+4x+3 in the form (x+a)(x+b)? The answer to this is simple, you need to search for two numbers which multiply together to make three, and also add together to make 4. In this case the answer is 3 and 1, so we can re-write our original equation as (x+3)(x+1)=0. Now because this product is equal to zero, we can write that either x+3=0 or x+1=0 (because when a product equals zero either one or both of the numbers being multiplied must be zero).

Starting with x+3=0, subtracting 3 from both sides gives us our first solution: x=-3.

We can now subtract 1 from both sides of x+1=0, giving us our second solution: x=-1.

As you can see, there are two solutions to this equation! If you find this hard to believe, you can check that both solutions are correct by replacing all of the x's in the original equation with each solution in turn, and they should both equal zero!

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9 months ago

203 views

How do you integrate the function cos^2(x)

At first, you might think that it is possible to perform this integral simply by inspection, using the 'backwards chain rule'. This method would consist of adding one to the power, to get cos3(x), then dividing by the new power and the derivative of the function, giving you -(1/3sin(x))cos3(x)...

At first, you might think that it is possible to perform this integral simply by inspection, using the 'backwards chain rule'. This method would consist of adding one to the power, to get cos3(x), then dividing by the new power and the derivative of the function, giving you -(1/3sin(x))cos3(x). However, once you have performed an integration it is always wise to check your result by differentiating to see if you get your starting function back. In this case, it is clear that differentiating -(1/3sin(x))cos3(x) does not give cos2(x), because you have to use the quotient rule to differentiate cos3(x)/sin(x).

This means that a different approach is required to perform the integration, and that is to use the trig identity cos2x=1/2+(1/2)cos(2x) to change the integrand to something which can be integrated easily. It is then simple to integrate 1/2 +(1/2)cos(2x) using the familiar method, giving the correct answer of (1/2)x+(1/4)sin(2x)+c (not forgetting the constant of integration!).

Similarly, sin2(x) can be integrated quickly using the trig identity sin2(x)=1/2-(1/2)cos(2x), so these two identities are definitely worth memorizing!

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9 months ago

208 views
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