Lucy W. GCSE Biology tutor, IB Biology tutor, GCSE Maths tutor, GCSE ...

Lucy W.

£18 - £20 /hr

Currently unavailable: for regular students

Studying: Bsc Biological Sciences (Bachelors) - Exeter University

3.7
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7 reviews| 19 completed tutorials

Contact Lucy

About me

I am currently studying Biological Science at Exeter University - a course that I absolutely love. 

I like to think I am a patient and considerate person, having experience tutoring younger family members, and other students whilst I was still at school, where I tutored in Biology and Maths for GCSE level students. 

During the sessions we have, you will decide what we go through, ensuring first that you have the basic understanding necessary to start developing exam technique! And I will try to do this using methods that best suit you. 

As for University applications, I successfully applied to 5 myself and know how hard it can be, so I am more than happy to help as much as I can with personal statements and applications. 

If you have any questions, please feel free to send me a 'WebMail' or book a 'Meet the Tutor Session'! All I need to know is your exam board and what you would like help with.

Whether you have any questions or would like to be tutored, it'd be great to hear from you!

I am currently studying Biological Science at Exeter University - a course that I absolutely love. 

I like to think I am a patient and considerate person, having experience tutoring younger family members, and other students whilst I was still at school, where I tutored in Biology and Maths for GCSE level students. 

During the sessions we have, you will decide what we go through, ensuring first that you have the basic understanding necessary to start developing exam technique! And I will try to do this using methods that best suit you. 

As for University applications, I successfully applied to 5 myself and know how hard it can be, so I am more than happy to help as much as I can with personal statements and applications. 

If you have any questions, please feel free to send me a 'WebMail' or book a 'Meet the Tutor Session'! All I need to know is your exam board and what you would like help with.

Whether you have any questions or would like to be tutored, it'd be great to hear from you!

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Ratings & Reviews

3.7from 7 customer reviews
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Emily (Student)

April 13 2016

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Arun (Student)

April 5 2016

A very informative Tutorial. I found it very useful and would definitely recommend to anyone.

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LAI (Parent)

April 13 2016

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Joe (Parent)

April 25 2016

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Qualifications

SubjectQualificationGrade
BiologyInternational Baccalaureate (IB)6
PsychologyInternational Baccalaureate (IB)7
ArtInternational Baccalaureate (IB)7
MathematicsInternational Baccalaureate (IB)6
SpanishInternational Baccalaureate (IB)7
EnglishInternational Baccalaureate (IB)6

General Availability

Before 12pm12pm - 5pmAfter 5pm
mondays
tuesdays
wednesdays
thursdays
fridays
saturdays
sundays

Subjects offered

SubjectQualificationPrices
BiologyGCSE£18 /hr
MathsGCSE£18 /hr
SpanishGCSE£18 /hr
BiologyIB£20 /hr
Maths13 Plus £18 /hr
Maths11 Plus£18 /hr

Questions Lucy has answered

How do you explain the process of translation?

Enzymes which are specific to different tRNA types catalyse the bonding of amino acids to tRNA molecules, which requires ATP for energy.

There are 4 stages to translation: initiation, elongation, translocation and termination.

During initiation, the small ribosomal subunit binds to the 5' end of mRNA and moves along it until it reaches the start codon (which is AUG). Then the tRNA molecule binds to the codon (via its anticodon), due to complementary base pairing (A-T, C-G). After, the large ribosomal subunit binds at the P-site of tRNA, forming a complex.

During elongation, a second tRNA molecule pairs with the next codon at the ribosomal A-site and the amino acid is covalently bonded to the amino acid at the P-site.

During translocation, the ribsome moves along to the next codon, and the first tRNA molecule is moved to the E-site and is released. So, a new tRNA molecule enters the now empty A site and the process is repeated, synthesising a polypeptide chain in a 5'-3' direction.

(If multiple ribsomes act on the same chain they form a polysome)

Finally, termination occurs when the stop codon is reached. This is a codon that does not code for any amino acid. The polypeptide chain is released and the ribosome disassembles to be used again for another chain.

Enzymes which are specific to different tRNA types catalyse the bonding of amino acids to tRNA molecules, which requires ATP for energy.

There are 4 stages to translation: initiation, elongation, translocation and termination.

During initiation, the small ribosomal subunit binds to the 5' end of mRNA and moves along it until it reaches the start codon (which is AUG). Then the tRNA molecule binds to the codon (via its anticodon), due to complementary base pairing (A-T, C-G). After, the large ribosomal subunit binds at the P-site of tRNA, forming a complex.

During elongation, a second tRNA molecule pairs with the next codon at the ribosomal A-site and the amino acid is covalently bonded to the amino acid at the P-site.

During translocation, the ribsome moves along to the next codon, and the first tRNA molecule is moved to the E-site and is released. So, a new tRNA molecule enters the now empty A site and the process is repeated, synthesising a polypeptide chain in a 5'-3' direction.

(If multiple ribsomes act on the same chain they form a polysome)

Finally, termination occurs when the stop codon is reached. This is a codon that does not code for any amino acid. The polypeptide chain is released and the ribosome disassembles to be used again for another chain.

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2 years ago

1042 views

How is blood pumped around the body through the heart?

Blood goes into the atria of the heart and the atria contract and force blood into the ventricles. The ventricles then contract and force the blood out of the heart.

There are valves in the heart which ensure that blood flows in unidirectionally in the right way.

Blood flows away from the heart to the organs through arteries and returns to the heart through veins.

In humans, there is a double circulation system, with 2 separate ones: one for the lungs and one for all other organs of the body.

Blood goes into the atria of the heart and the atria contract and force blood into the ventricles. The ventricles then contract and force the blood out of the heart.

There are valves in the heart which ensure that blood flows in unidirectionally in the right way.

Blood flows away from the heart to the organs through arteries and returns to the heart through veins.

In humans, there is a double circulation system, with 2 separate ones: one for the lungs and one for all other organs of the body.

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2 years ago

739 views

What is the best way to solve simultaneous equations?

The easiest way to solve simultaneous equations is to label the equations so you clearly follow them throughout.

For example, say you are asked to solve the unknowns for the simultaneous equations 3x-y=8 and 2x+y=7 

Label the first equation 1.) and the second 2.), like so:

1.) 3x-y=8 

2.) 2x+y=7

You now need to perform an operation to eliminate one of the unknowns from the equations. It is always easiest to elimate the unknown which has the same multiple in each equation.

So here, we would work to elimate y. Looking at the signs we can see that equation 1.) has a  negative y and 2.) a positive, so all we have to do to eliminate y is the add the equation 2.) to equation 1.), like so:

1.) + 2.) : 5x=15

Now, all you have to do is solve this like a regular equation, so by dividing 15 by 5 we get x=3.

The next step is substitute the known x value into either one of the original equations. I will use both here to show that either works:

1.) 3(3)-y=8

so 9-y=8, and hence y=1. 

2.) 2(3)+y=7

so 6+y=7, and again, y=1

It is always useful to substitute your first known variable into one equation, and then substitute both variables into the second, as a check to see if you are correct.

The easiest way to solve simultaneous equations is to label the equations so you clearly follow them throughout.

For example, say you are asked to solve the unknowns for the simultaneous equations 3x-y=8 and 2x+y=7 

Label the first equation 1.) and the second 2.), like so:

1.) 3x-y=8 

2.) 2x+y=7

You now need to perform an operation to eliminate one of the unknowns from the equations. It is always easiest to elimate the unknown which has the same multiple in each equation.

So here, we would work to elimate y. Looking at the signs we can see that equation 1.) has a  negative y and 2.) a positive, so all we have to do to eliminate y is the add the equation 2.) to equation 1.), like so:

1.) + 2.) : 5x=15

Now, all you have to do is solve this like a regular equation, so by dividing 15 by 5 we get x=3.

The next step is substitute the known x value into either one of the original equations. I will use both here to show that either works:

1.) 3(3)-y=8

so 9-y=8, and hence y=1. 

2.) 2(3)+y=7

so 6+y=7, and again, y=1

It is always useful to substitute your first known variable into one equation, and then substitute both variables into the second, as a check to see if you are correct.

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2 years ago

740 views

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