Michael J. GCSE Biology tutor, A Level Biology tutor, GCSE Chemistry ...

Michael J.

Currently unavailable: for new students

Degree: Medicine (Bachelors) - Oxford, The Queen's College University

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About me

Hi! My name is Michael, and I'm a medical student at Oxford University! I'm a friendly, hard working and engaging tutor with plenty of experience working with children in a classroom environment and on a one to one basis.

What can I offer? 

As someone who's course demands rapid absorption of knowledge in light of constant examination, I fully understand the importance of gaining an understanding of the key concepts underlying science and language (french) and how to apply this knowledge for maximum success in examinations. 

To achieve this my sessions will be centred on your needs as the student, using whatever tools work best to help you learn and become confident in your subject area. We will work through areas that you are struggling with, break them down to the basics and build up from there to ensure you have the confidence and knowledge to achieve your potential, whatever point you're starting from!

Having recently gone through examinations my self, I understand that a key area of success is exam technique and understanding what you need to know by the examinors. I will use exam board syllabuses to help guide this and to ensure our time together is directed towards your specific needs. 

How to contact me!

Any further queries? Don’t hesitate to contact me! Send me a 'WebMail' or Book a 'Meet the Tutor Session'

I look forward to hearing from you!

Subjects offered

SubjectLevelMy prices
Biology A Level £20 /hr
Biology GCSE £18 /hr
Chemistry GCSE £18 /hr
French GCSE £18 /hr

Qualifications

QualificationLevelGrade
BiologyA-LevelA*
ChemistryA-LevelA
FrenchA-LevelA*
Disclosure and Barring Service

CRB/DBS Standard

No

CRB/DBS Enhanced

27/11/2015

Currently unavailable: for new students

General Availability

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Please get in touch for more detailed availability

Ratings and reviews

5from 2 customer reviews

Sam (Parent) May 5 2016

An excellent tutorial with simple and informative explanations...I really enjoyed it. Thank you very much for your help!

Maria (Parent) April 26 2016

Questions Michael has answered

Explain how skeletal muscle contraction is stimulated

A nerve impulse travelling down a motor neurone causes the release of acetylcholine from the synpatic knob into the synaptic cleft. This then diffuses across the synaptic cleft down its concentration gradient and binds to complementary receptors on the sarcolemma. This binding causes the openi...

A nerve impulse travelling down a motor neurone causes the release of acetylcholine from the synpatic knob into the synaptic cleft. This then diffuses across the synaptic cleft down its concentration gradient and binds to complementary receptors on the sarcolemma. This binding causes the opening of ion channels associated with the acetylcholine receptor, leading to an influx of positive ions and a depolarisation of the sarcolemma which spreads along to invaginations of the membrane known as T tubules. These structures are in close conjunction with sarcoplasmic reticulum, and the depolarisation causes subsequent calcium ion release from the sarcoplasmic reticulum. Calcium ions diffuse through the sarcoplasm and bind to tropinin, intiating the sliding of the myosin and actin filaments and the contraction of skeletal muscle. 

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8 months ago

217 views

Outline the lock and key mechanism of enzyme-controlled reactions

Enzymes are proteins that catalyse specific biological reactions in the body. These proteins have a specific 3D structure known as a teritary structure, with a specialised domain known as an 'active site' that is complementary to and specific for the substrate of the reaction they catalyse. Th...

Enzymes are proteins that catalyse specific biological reactions in the body. These proteins have a specific 3D structure known as a teritary structure, with a specialised domain known as an 'active site' that is complementary to and specific for the substrate of the reaction they catalyse. This substrate binds the active site, like a key into a lock, allowing the reaction to proceed.

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8 months ago

235 views

What is the imperfect tense and how do I conjugate it?

The imperfect tense describes something one 'used to do'. It is less specific than the perfect tense, which describes a specific action taking place at a specific time, and is used to describe more general actions in the past. For example 'I used to play tennis' is the imperfect, whereas 'Last...

The imperfect tense describes something one 'used to do'. It is less specific than the perfect tense, which describes a specific action taking place at a specific time, and is used to describe more general actions in the past. For example 'I used to play tennis' is the imperfect, whereas 'Last Wednesday, I played tennis' is the perfect. In order to conjugate the imperfect tense, take the 'nous' form of the verb and remove the -ons suffix. Then, add one of the folllowing endings accoridng to the subject of the sentence:

je -ais

tu -ais

il/elle -ait

nous -ions

vous -iez

ils/elles -aient

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8 months ago

195 views
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