Katherine R. GCSE Physics tutor

Katherine R.

Currently unavailable: for regular students

Degree: Physics (Bachelors) - Durham University

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About me

I am a second year physics student at Durham University so I love talking about all things to do with science! I hope in my tutorial you will enjoy talking with me about everything from stars and galaxies to the structure of the atom. 

I tutored maths GCSE to students at my secondary school and I really enjoy discussing a topic until everyone is confident and ready to try exam questions to the best of their ability. I also ran a science club for years 7-11 so I am used to explaining scientific concepts to all levels. 

I hope we can have a productive time exploring some of the more challenging concepts on your course!

I look forward to meeting you.

Subjects offered

SubjectLevelMy prices
Physics A Level £20 /hr
Physics GCSE £18 /hr

Qualifications

QualificationLevelGrade
ChemistryA-LevelA
PhysicsA-LevelA*
MathematicsA-LevelA
Disclosure and Barring Service

CRB/DBS Standard

No

CRB/DBS Enhanced

No

Currently unavailable: for regular students

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Ratings and reviews

5from 7 customer reviews

Teresa (Parent) October 25 2016

Katherine has been a real gem, Hazel responds really well to her style of teaching and grasps the subject much better with concise explanations. Really pleased with progress and confidence built up in the short time Katherine has been dealing with Hazel. We keep having issues with our wifi dropping out at the crucial lesson time, but Katherine is great and helps Hazel with prepared notes. Many thanks so glad we found you:)

Edna (Parent) June 16 2016

Really enthusiastic she has a passion for physics. Very detailed analysis as you go along. Perfect for everyone. Highly recommend

Ali (Parent) May 30 2016

Hija (Student) May 30 2016

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Questions Katherine has answered

How do I work out the efficiency of a process from a Sankey diagram?

The formula for efficiency is: efficiency = (useful energy / total energy) Therefore, first we must find the total energy which is the sum of all of the branches of the Sankey diagram. So take the energy specified at each branch and add them to find a total. The useful energy will be the ene...

The formula for efficiency is:

efficiency = (useful energy / total energy)

Therefore, first we must find the total energy which is the sum of all of the branches of the Sankey diagram. So take the energy specified at each branch and add them to find a total.

The useful energy will be the energy specified by the branch which does not turn off to one side- it carries on straight forwards. For example, in a circuit with a light bulb, the useful energy will be the light energy. 

Divide the useful energy by the total energy and you will get the efficiency which should be between 0 and 1. Multiply by 100 to find the percentage efficiency. 

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8 months ago

221 views

How do we know about the structure of the atom?

Scientists originally thought that atoms were like a 'plum pudding' in that they were a sphere of positive charge with negatively charged electrons scattered about inside it. This was because they observed from experiment that the atom was neutral and also that it contained electrons. Therefor...

Scientists originally thought that atoms were like a 'plum pudding' in that they were a sphere of positive charge with negatively charged electrons scattered about inside it. This was because they observed from experiment that the atom was neutral and also that it contained electrons. Therefore the negatively charged electrons must be cancelled out by a positive charge.

However, a scientist named Rutherford proved this model wrong by firing positively charged particles named alpha particles at some atoms in gold foil. Most of the alpha particles went straight through the foil but some were deflected back the way they had come. 

This lead to our current model of the atom where most of it is empty space, allowing most of the particles to pass straight through. The nucleus is a positively charged collection of protons and neutrons (which have no charge) and so repels the positively charged alpha particles. The electrons surround this nucleus in rings. 

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8 months ago

216 views

What is nuclear fusion?

When two atomic nuclei are heated to a very high temperature and high pressure, for example inside a star, their nuclei can join to make a larger nucleus. Energy is released when this fusion takes place and the new nucleus is a different element to the original nuclei. For example, inside our ...

When two atomic nuclei are heated to a very high temperature and high pressure, for example inside a star, their nuclei can join to make a larger nucleus. Energy is released when this fusion takes place and the new nucleus is a different element to the original nuclei. For example, inside our sun two hydrogen nuclei can fuse to form one helium nucleus. This fusion can then happen with largerr nuclei to form larger elements like carbon.

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8 months ago

209 views
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