Isabel G. A Level Spanish tutor, GCSE Spanish tutor, A Level English ...

Isabel G.

£18 - £22 /hr

Studying: Chinese (Bachelors) - Oxford, St Hilda's College University

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About me

About Me:

I am a student of Chinese at Oxford University. I've always enjoyed languages, literature and the humanities generally; I firmly believe that anyone can learn a language or write a great essay with the right teacher.

I'm not afraid to put some work in to make sure that you succeed, and I really enjoy engaging and mentoring other students. At my secondary school, I was a senior prefect for Modern Foreign Languages, and my duties included encouraging younger students in their language learning. During my year out, I was a student ambassador at Leeds College of Art, a job which involved me guiding students through college life and the application process.

I'm applying to Oxbridge. Any advice?

Without a doubt. I successfully applied to Oxford for deferred entry, and although I was 'pooled' to a college which wasn't my first choice, I am very happy with where I am right now. I was lucky enough to receive some brilliant advice during my UCAS application, and I hope to be able to pass on some of that advice to you. I'd recommend applying to Oxbridge to anybody, no matter what your background. I'm from a state school and I've massively enjoyed my time at Oxford so far - I even got a Distinction in my year one exams!

I look forward to talking to you! :) 

About Me:

I am a student of Chinese at Oxford University. I've always enjoyed languages, literature and the humanities generally; I firmly believe that anyone can learn a language or write a great essay with the right teacher.

I'm not afraid to put some work in to make sure that you succeed, and I really enjoy engaging and mentoring other students. At my secondary school, I was a senior prefect for Modern Foreign Languages, and my duties included encouraging younger students in their language learning. During my year out, I was a student ambassador at Leeds College of Art, a job which involved me guiding students through college life and the application process.

I'm applying to Oxbridge. Any advice?

Without a doubt. I successfully applied to Oxford for deferred entry, and although I was 'pooled' to a college which wasn't my first choice, I am very happy with where I am right now. I was lucky enough to receive some brilliant advice during my UCAS application, and I hope to be able to pass on some of that advice to you. I'd recommend applying to Oxbridge to anybody, no matter what your background. I'm from a state school and I've massively enjoyed my time at Oxford so far - I even got a Distinction in my year one exams!

I look forward to talking to you! :) 

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About my sessions

During my classes, I hope that you will tell me what you're having trouble with, so that together we can outline a dynamic and useful lesson plan. 

Language and literature can be really fun, and I hope that this will come across in our sessions. Through context, engaging examples and explanations of underlying principles, I hope to clarify any issues that you're having trouble with. In our classes I will attempt to make the subject come to life; studying shouldn't just be about passing exams, but about enriching your understanding of the world. 

If you have any questions, send me a 'WebMail' or book a 'Meet the Tutor Session'! (both accessible through this website). Let me know what you're studying, your exam board and the particular areas on which you want to focus in our sessions. 

During my classes, I hope that you will tell me what you're having trouble with, so that together we can outline a dynamic and useful lesson plan. 

Language and literature can be really fun, and I hope that this will come across in our sessions. Through context, engaging examples and explanations of underlying principles, I hope to clarify any issues that you're having trouble with. In our classes I will attempt to make the subject come to life; studying shouldn't just be about passing exams, but about enriching your understanding of the world. 

If you have any questions, send me a 'WebMail' or book a 'Meet the Tutor Session'! (both accessible through this website). Let me know what you're studying, your exam board and the particular areas on which you want to focus in our sessions. 

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Qualifications

SubjectQualificationGrade
SpanishA-level (A2)A*
English LiteratureA-level (A2)A*
Art and DesignA-level (A2)A*
FrenchA-level (A2)A

General Availability

Before 12pm12pm - 5pmAfter 5pm
mondays
tuesdays
wednesdays
thursdays
fridays
saturdays
sundays

Subjects offered

SubjectQualificationPrices
ArtGCSE£18 /hr
English LiteratureGCSE£18 /hr
FrenchGCSE£18 /hr
MandarinGCSE£18 /hr
SpanishGCSE£18 /hr
French13 Plus £18 /hr
Mandarin13 Plus £18 /hr
Spanish13 Plus £18 /hr
-Personal Statements-Mentoring£22 /hr

Questions Isabel has answered

How does Shakespeare make use of metre in 'Romeo and Juliet'?

The majority of Shakespeare's 'Romeo and Juliet' is written in blank verse, or unrhymed iambic pentameter. This meter closely replicates the natural rhythm of spoken English. However, at key moments - such as the conclusions of scenes, or the prologue - Shakespeare uses rhyme to add dramatic effect. Take, for example, the moment when Romeo first sees Juliet at the Capulet's ball: 'Oh, she doth teach the torches to burn bright!' Shakespeare also dispenses of iambic pentameter to underline the abrupt or crass nature of certain sections of dialogue - for example, during bawdy jokes, or when servants are conversing amongst themselves.  'Away with the joint-stools, remove the court-cupboard, look to the plate. Good thou, save me a piece of marchpane, and, as thou loves me, let the porter let in Susan Grindstone and Nell.—Antony and Potpan!' The majority of Shakespeare's 'Romeo and Juliet' is written in blank verse, or unrhymed iambic pentameter. This meter closely replicates the natural rhythm of spoken English. However, at key moments - such as the conclusions of scenes, or the prologue - Shakespeare uses rhyme to add dramatic effect. Take, for example, the moment when Romeo first sees Juliet at the Capulet's ball: 'Oh, she doth teach the torches to burn bright!' Shakespeare also dispenses of iambic pentameter to underline the abrupt or crass nature of certain sections of dialogue - for example, during bawdy jokes, or when servants are conversing amongst themselves.  'Away with the joint-stools, remove the court-cupboard, look to the plate. Good thou, save me a piece of marchpane, and, as thou loves me, let the porter let in Susan Grindstone and Nell.—Antony and Potpan!'

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2 months ago

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