Patrick B. A Level Chemistry tutor, IB Chemistry tutor, GCSE Chemistr...

Patrick B.

Currently unavailable: for regular students

Degree: Natural Sciences Biology/Chemistry (Masters) - Durham University

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About me

About Me

Hello, my name is Patrick, I recently graduated from Durham University with a joint honours masters in biology and chemistry. I have experience with Teach First, and I am a hugely enthusiastic science tutor.

Science is all about understanding concepts – I believe that once you know the underlying ideas, you can tackle any question an exam throws at you with confidence. I can help you reach that point where it clicks!

Tutoring

I pride myself on my ability to explain things so they stick. I like to use pictures, diagrams and analogies when explaining scientific ideas (I’m a very visual learner!)

I also like to break down exam questions into manageable chunks, so you can see what the examiner is looking for, and how to apply this to new questions.

Just let me know what it is you’re struggling with, and I will start from a little bit before the bit you got stuck on. Once we’ve covered the easy stuff I’ll gradually ease you into the unfamiliar territory, and before you know it, it will all be easy peasy!

My Experience

I am familiar with both one-on-one tutoring, which I did on a regular basis at university, and classroom teaching, which I practiced during an internship with Teach First in 2015. I was also a senior prefect at sixth form and have plenty of experience leading music groups – I would definitely describe myself as a people person!

Say Hello!

If you’d like to get in touch with me, please feel free to send me an email – let me know your subject, what areas you’d like me to help you with and what exam board you study, and I will help alleviate those biochemistry blues!

Subjects offered

SubjectLevelMy prices
Biology A Level £20 /hr
Chemistry A Level £20 /hr
Biology GCSE £18 /hr
Chemistry GCSE £18 /hr
Maths GCSE £18 /hr
Maths 13 Plus £18 /hr
Maths 11 Plus £18 /hr
-Personal Statements- Mentoring £20 /hr

Qualifications

QualificationLevelGrade
BiologyA-LevelA*
ChemistryA-LevelA*
MathematicsA-LevelA
MSci Biology and ChemistryMasters DegreeFirst Class Honours
Disclosure and Barring Service

CRB/DBS Standard

06/11/2015

CRB/DBS Enhanced

No

Currently unavailable: for regular students

General Availability

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Please get in touch for more detailed availability

Questions Patrick has answered

What is chirality?

Sometimes two molecules can exist as non-superimposable mirror-images. That is to say, the mirror image of a molecule cannot be exactly placed on top of the original molecule. A good example of this is your hands: they are mirror images of one another, but cannot be exactly placed on top of e...

Sometimes two molecules can exist as non-superimposable mirror-images. That is to say, the mirror image of a molecule cannot be exactly placed on top of the original molecule.

A good example of this is your hands: they are mirror images of one another, but cannot be exactly placed on top of each other. 

Pairs of molecules that exhibit this property are known as enantiomers. When a carbon atom is bonded to four distinct groups, this is known as a chiral centre, and two enantiomers of this arrangement are seen.

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5 months ago

186 views

What is the difference between transcription and translation?

All cells use DNA as a code for making proteins: the sequence of base pairs in a long, string-like DNA molecule acts as a set of instructions for making a protein, which is also a long, string-like molecule (made up of amino acid building blocks). However there is a middle step as well. Inste...

All cells use DNA as a code for making proteins: the sequence of base pairs in a long, string-like DNA molecule acts as a set of instructions for making a protein, which is also a long, string-like molecule (made up of amino acid building blocks).

However there is a middle step as well. Instead of the DNA code being directly used to make proteins, the DNA code is used to make a molcule of RNA (which is structurally very similar to DNA). This RNA molecules contains the same code as the original DNA, and it is this which is used by the cell to make the protein molecule.

Transcription is the process of using the code in a DNA molecule to make an RNA molecule; translation is a process of using the code in an RNA molecule to make a protein molecule.

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5 months ago

156 views
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