Marcus L. Mentoring -Oxbridge Preparation- tutor, Uni Admissions Test...

Marcus L.

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Degree: German and Italian (Bachelors) - Oxford, Magdalen College University

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About me

Subjects offers: English, Italian, German (GCSE, A-Level, IB)

Hi there! My name is Marcus and I am a current 3rd-year undergraduate at Oxford reading for a BA in Medieval and Modern Languages.

I love seeing a student come to understand a tricky piece of grammar, or love discussing abstract questions in literature. My experiences both as a private tutor and a language assistant at a German university specialised in pedagogy has really helped me to respond well to how my tutees learn. I was fortunate enough to have very dedicated teachers when I was at school, and when I tutor, I not only teach, but also foster a sense of excitement and curiosity for my subjects. With this, all of my pupils to date have exceeded their original predicted grade. Send me a message regarding tuition possibilities! 

Some tutoring/ proofreading experiences:

- proofread Prof. Meyer's article (Koblenz, 2013) on modern visual adaptations of Shakespeare's The Tempest

- taught Of Mice and Men, Lord of the Flies, An Inspector Calls, various AQA anthologies at GCSE level

- held a creative writing seminar for GCSE pupils

- German GCSE and A-Level teaching with self-written materials

- proofread bachelor theses on Mrs Dalloway, The Strange Case of Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde etc.

held speaking tutorials for German students learning English

- taught English as a foreign language for children and adults

- worked as teaching assistant at an Oxfordshire school/ held internships at two other

- taught at a school in Verona, Italy for English literature/ language

Subjects offered

SubjectLevelMy prices
English Language A Level £22 /hr
German A Level £22 /hr
English Language GCSE £20 /hr
English Literature GCSE £20 /hr
German GCSE £20 /hr
Mandarin GCSE £20 /hr
Maths GCSE £20 /hr
English Language IB £22 /hr
German IB £22 /hr
German 13 Plus £20 /hr
.MLAT (Modern Languages) Uni Admissions Test £25 /hr

Qualifications

QualificationLevelGrade
German A-LevelA
English Literature and LanguageA-LevelA*
MathematicsA-LevelA
Disclosure and Barring Service

CRB/DBS Standard

01/09/2012

CRB/DBS Enhanced

No

Currently unavailable: for new students

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Ratings and reviews

5from 2 customer reviews

Maria (Parent) April 24 2016

Marcus appears knows his subject well. He was well organised and showed good appreciation of the challenges my daughter is facing and how to overcome them. A well run and engaging session. Thank you.

Dilka (Parent) April 23 2016

Questions Marcus has answered

But how can we be sure that is what the author intended?

That's a really interesting point to raise. In short, I don't think we can, especially if the author has passed away.  Looking at the text though, there are definitely hints pointing us to a certain message, an idea, almost like an encrypted message if you like. Sometimes, reading what critic...

That's a really interesting point to raise. In short, I don't think we can, especially if the author has passed away. 

Looking at the text though, there are definitely hints pointing us to a certain message, an idea, almost like an encrypted message if you like. Sometimes, reading what critics have thought about the piece of work can help, but what they say shouldn't be the definitive answer. What makes literature interesting is that there can be many answers, as long as you can explain logically how you came to that interpretation. But if two people have very different ideas about what something means, that in itself is also very striking. We can look at what is making them think differently, or what this contrast in interpretation can tell us about the composition of the work in the first place. 

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10 months ago

230 views

What are cases?

Every word has a function in a sentence. Sometimes, we can take words away and the sentence still makes sense. However, at other times, some words are essential for the sentence to not sound 'odd.' Say the sentence "I gave the book" - we would think it weird and not making much sense, "gave th...

Every word has a function in a sentence. Sometimes, we can take words away and the sentence still makes sense. However, at other times, some words are essential for the sentence to not sound 'odd.' Say the sentence "I gave the book" - we would think it weird and not making much sense, "gave the book to who?"

As long as we accept that words perform a function within a sentence, then we can group these words under different headings according to their function; it helps us to think about how the grammatical structure of the sentence works. Now if we ignore all other categories apart from nouns, we can subdivide them into roughly four different sub-groups in German. Let's use the sentence above: "I gave Tom's book to my sister." The nouns here are: "I," "sister," "book," and "Tom." Now, here is where it gets a bit tricky.

Jargons:

1) "I" am the person doing the verb, because I was the one who gave the book to my sister. 

2) "The book" is affected by the verb, because it is the thing that was given to my sister. 

3) "My sister" is also implicated, in a way, by the verb, because she is the one who receives the book, or the one who was given the book.

4) "Tom" is involved, too, though probably not directly. His role is only to tell us more information about the book. It belongs to Tom, it is his possession. (If we substituted "Tom's" with "the," the sentence would still make sense.)

How does this link to cases?

1) So, when something or someone carries out the action (verb), we call that thing the SUBJECT. The subject is in the NOMINATIVE case. (This is just a jargon).

2) When something is affected directly by the verb, as in the action is done upon it, then we call it the DIRECT OBJECT. The direct object is in the ACCUSATIVE case.

3) When a verb, like "give" requires another object, one that is affected by the action but the action is not performed on it, then this is the INDIRECT OBJECT. The indirect object is in the DATIVE CASE. (Think back to the first example and how it made no sense because we would be left wondering to whom the book was given)

4) GENITIVE is the last one. It shows a possessive relationship between two things, so in our example, this would be "Tom's book" (or the book of Tom). Usually, if you see the word "of" you can be pretty sure it takes the genitive. There are anomalies to this of course! 

Cases are very important in most languages, and especially in German because words change forms depending on the function it plays in the sentence. If words change, this can mean that the order of words need not be so rigid for the sentence to retain its meaning. In poetry, for instance, this can generate interesting play on words that other languages cannot because they rely a lot more on word order.

This is only an introduction, and there are a lot more to cover when it comes to cases. But I hoped this has helped at least a little bit and offers a foundation for later. 

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10 months ago

252 views
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