Chris M. GCSE Chemistry tutor, A Level Chemistry tutor, GCSE Biology ...

Chris M.

£20 - £22 /hr

Currently unavailable: for new students

Studying: BMBCh (Medicine) (Bachelors) - Oxford, St Catherine's College University

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About me

Hey,

You've made it this far, now read a little about me and what you can expect, and hopefully get in touch.

I recently graduated from a masters in chemistry at Oxford University and I am now back at Oxford studying medicine having been on a gap year. The sciences have always been of big interest to me, and I would love the opportunity to pass this on to you. I have A-levels in Further Maths, Biology, Chemistry and Physics.

I have plenty of teaching experience having been a qualified swimming teacher and lifeguard Trainer/Assessor for several years.

Hey,

You've made it this far, now read a little about me and what you can expect, and hopefully get in touch.

I recently graduated from a masters in chemistry at Oxford University and I am now back at Oxford studying medicine having been on a gap year. The sciences have always been of big interest to me, and I would love the opportunity to pass this on to you. I have A-levels in Further Maths, Biology, Chemistry and Physics.

I have plenty of teaching experience having been a qualified swimming teacher and lifeguard Trainer/Assessor for several years.

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About my sessions

I will first work through a checklist of what you need to know with you, in order to assess your confidence in each part of the course, so that we can focus on those areas that need work.

We will then work through each of these areas at your pace, until you are fully able to understand them. I will explain any concepts that need explaining and we will work through problems together to build your confidence in yourself!

I want some sessions:

Get in touch and let me know what subject and exam board, and we can get started!

See you soon,

Chris

I will first work through a checklist of what you need to know with you, in order to assess your confidence in each part of the course, so that we can focus on those areas that need work.

We will then work through each of these areas at your pace, until you are fully able to understand them. I will explain any concepts that need explaining and we will work through problems together to build your confidence in yourself!

I want some sessions:

Get in touch and let me know what subject and exam board, and we can get started!

See you soon,

Chris

Show more

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12/12/2015

Qualifications

SubjectQualificationGrade
MathsA-level (A2)A*
Further MathsA-level (A2)A*
BiologyA-level (A2)A*
ChemistryA-level (A2)A*
PhysicsA-level (A2)A
ChemistryDegree (Masters)1:1

General Availability

Before 12pm12pm - 5pmAfter 5pm
mondays
tuesdays
wednesdays
thursdays
fridays
saturdays
sundays

Subjects offered

SubjectQualificationPrices
BiologyA Level£22 /hr
ChemistryA Level£22 /hr
MathsA Level£22 /hr
PhysicsA Level£22 /hr

Questions Chris has answered

What are the different types of bonding in chemicals?

There are 2 types of bonding in chemicals; ionic bonding and covalent bonding. Both of these aim to fill the outer shells of the atoms. You can also have bonds between molecules called intramolecular bonds.

Ionic bonds:

Ionic bonding is where the electrons involved in the bond are fully transferred from one species to another in order to fill the outer shell of all the atoms involved. This creates some ions which are positively charged, and some which are negatively charged, and their is an electrostatic attraction between the opposite charges.

For example, in table salt, NaCl, the sodium fully transfers one if it's electrons to the chlorine to make Na+ and Cl- which attract each other to form NaCl.

Covalent bonds:

Covalent bonds are when the species involved share some of their electrons with each other so that both species fill their outer shells.

For example, in hydrogen, each hydrogen atom on it's own only has 1 electron in it's outer shell. To fill it, they need 2, so they each share their single electron with the other, so that both hydrogen atoms have access to both electrons, therefore having full outer shells and making H2.

There are 2 types of bonding in chemicals; ionic bonding and covalent bonding. Both of these aim to fill the outer shells of the atoms. You can also have bonds between molecules called intramolecular bonds.

Ionic bonds:

Ionic bonding is where the electrons involved in the bond are fully transferred from one species to another in order to fill the outer shell of all the atoms involved. This creates some ions which are positively charged, and some which are negatively charged, and their is an electrostatic attraction between the opposite charges.

For example, in table salt, NaCl, the sodium fully transfers one if it's electrons to the chlorine to make Na+ and Cl- which attract each other to form NaCl.

Covalent bonds:

Covalent bonds are when the species involved share some of their electrons with each other so that both species fill their outer shells.

For example, in hydrogen, each hydrogen atom on it's own only has 1 electron in it's outer shell. To fill it, they need 2, so they each share their single electron with the other, so that both hydrogen atoms have access to both electrons, therefore having full outer shells and making H2.

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2 years ago

716 views

What is an isotope?

Isotopes are different forms of the same element by mass. While an atom is classified as a particular element based on the number of protons in the nucleus, the specific isotope of that element is determined by the number of neutrons in the nucleus.

For example:

Chlorine is reported as having a relative atomic mass of 35.5. This is because chlorine actually has 2 isotopes, Cl35 and Cl37. The figure of 35.5 is an average of these two, weighted by natural abundance.

Both of these isotopes have 17 protons, which defines them as chlorine atoms, but the Cl35 has 22 neutrons, whereas the Cl37 has 24.

Isotopes are different forms of the same element by mass. While an atom is classified as a particular element based on the number of protons in the nucleus, the specific isotope of that element is determined by the number of neutrons in the nucleus.

For example:

Chlorine is reported as having a relative atomic mass of 35.5. This is because chlorine actually has 2 isotopes, Cl35 and Cl37. The figure of 35.5 is an average of these two, weighted by natural abundance.

Both of these isotopes have 17 protons, which defines them as chlorine atoms, but the Cl35 has 22 neutrons, whereas the Cl37 has 24.

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2 years ago

739 views

What is enthalpy?

Enthalpy (given the symbol H) is a measure of how much heat energy can be released by a chemical. ΔH is defined as the amount of heat energy released or taken in when two chemicals react. If ΔH is negative it means that the reaction is exothermic and will give out heat as it progresses and will feel hot.

If ΔH is positive then the reaction is endothermic and will therefore absorb heat as it progresses, and will feel cold.

Enthalpy (given the symbol H) is a measure of how much heat energy can be released by a chemical. ΔH is defined as the amount of heat energy released or taken in when two chemicals react. If ΔH is negative it means that the reaction is exothermic and will give out heat as it progresses and will feel hot.

If ΔH is positive then the reaction is endothermic and will therefore absorb heat as it progresses, and will feel cold.

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2 years ago

917 views

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