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Madeha N.

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Applied Statistics (Masters) - Oxford, Kellogg College University

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About me

I am a Mathematics and Economics enthusiast and it is reflected by my interest in contemporary issues in the respective fields. Having finished BSc Mathematics with first class from University of Manchester I am now working towards MSc Applied Statistics from University of Oxford and plan on doing further research. During college I participated in debates, writing and philosophical discourse which formed the basis of my interests and it widened my horizons and equipped me with skills to think independently. These strong foundations have enabled me to succeed academically as I developed independent learning and research skills. I also have tutoring experience for GCE Mathematics and Economics. I am thus keen to impart this knowledge and various skills with budding social and natural scientists by tutoring GCSE Sciences, GCSE and GCE Mathematics, Economics and Business studies. 

I am a Mathematics and Economics enthusiast and it is reflected by my interest in contemporary issues in the respective fields. Having finished BSc Mathematics with first class from University of Manchester I am now working towards MSc Applied Statistics from University of Oxford and plan on doing further research. During college I participated in debates, writing and philosophical discourse which formed the basis of my interests and it widened my horizons and equipped me with skills to think independently. These strong foundations have enabled me to succeed academically as I developed independent learning and research skills. I also have tutoring experience for GCE Mathematics and Economics. I am thus keen to impart this knowledge and various skills with budding social and natural scientists by tutoring GCSE Sciences, GCSE and GCE Mathematics, Economics and Business studies. 

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11/04/2016

Qualifications

SubjectQualificationGrade
MathematicsDegree (Bachelors)First Class
MathematicsA-level (A2)A*
Further MathematicsA-level (A2)A*
EconomicsA-level (A2)A

General Availability

Pre 12pm12-5pmAfter 5pm
mondays
tuesdays
wednesdays
thursdays
fridays
saturdays
sundays

Subjects offered

SubjectQualificationPrices
EconomicsA Level£20 /hr
Further MathematicsA Level£20 /hr
MathsA Level£20 /hr
EconomicsGCSE£18 /hr
Further MathematicsGCSE£18 /hr
MathsGCSE£18 /hr
EconomicsIB£20 /hr
Further MathematicsIB£20 /hr
MathsIB£20 /hr
Maths13 Plus£18 /hr
Maths11 Plus£18 /hr

Questions Madeha has answered

How can we remember the difference between differentiation and integration?

Integration is the inverse of differentiation. I.e. for differentiation of linear expressions we multiply the coeifficient with the power of the unknown and then subract 1 from the power. Integration is the opposite - we add one to the power of the unknown and then divide the coefficient by the new power. Differentiation of trigonometric functions follows a similar rule - sin differentiates to cos and as the process is inverse cos integrates to sin.

Integration is the inverse of differentiation. I.e. for differentiation of linear expressions we multiply the coeifficient with the power of the unknown and then subract 1 from the power. Integration is the opposite - we add one to the power of the unknown and then divide the coefficient by the new power. Differentiation of trigonometric functions follows a similar rule - sin differentiates to cos and as the process is inverse cos integrates to sin.

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2 years ago

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