PremiumSusie B. A Level Music tutor, GCSE Music tutor

Susie B.

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Degree: Music (Bachelors) - Bristol University

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About me

About Me

I’ve been studying music nearly my whole life, having had cello and piano lessons since the age of 5. Music has always been my passion, and I feel very lucky that I was able to formally study it not only at school, but also at Bristol University (where I graduated with a 2:1 in 2015).

Music can and should be an enjoyable subject if it is taught well, and since I’ve been learning music from such a young age, I am full of easy and fun ways to remember difficult concepts.

Teaching Experience

I currently teach a weekly music class to 15 noisy nursery children. This means I have developed a clear and fun teaching style where I take things slowly and keep my pupils engaged at all times.

I have also been a cello teacher for over 6 years and have regular pupils between the ages of 5 and 18. I incorporate music theory into all of my lessons so that my students are clued up, versatile musicians who can transfer their skills to their academic studies.

I’ve experienced a huge variety of music education over the years. From instrumental lessons and masterclasses to great schoolteachers and leading experts in music research at university, these experiences have ensured that I have a well-rounded knowledge of music that goes beyond the syllabus.

Because I have studied music in many different ways, I can offer many different approaches to learning and draw on my experiences to make my teaching as effective and enjoyable as possible.

Any questions?

If you have any questions, send me a 'WebMail' or book a 'Meet the Tutor Session' through the website. I'm happy to help with whatever you're struggling with!

Subjects offered

SubjectLevelMy prices
Music A Level £20 /hr
Music GCSE £18 /hr

Qualifications

QualificationLevelGrade
MusicA-LevelA
English LiteratureA-LevelA
HistoryA-LevelA
BA MusicBachelors Degree2:1
MMus Cello PerformanceMasters DegreeOngoing
Disclosure and Barring Service

CRB/DBS Standard

29/10/2015

CRB/DBS Enhanced

29/10/2015

Currently unavailable: for regular students

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Questions Susie has answered

How do I recognise Baroque style?

There are many defining features of Baroque style, but perhaps the easiest way to recognise it is by listening to the instruments. The harpsichord was the main Baroque keyboard instrument, as the piano we know today was only developed much later. Therefore, if you can hear a harpsichord, it...

There are many defining features of Baroque style, but perhaps the easiest way to recognise it is by listening to the instruments.

The harpsichord was the main Baroque keyboard instrument, as the piano we know today was only developed much later. Therefore, if you can hear a harpsichord, it’s probably a good indication that the music is from Baroque times. Other popular Baroque instruments that soon went out of fashion were the recorder (probably a familiar sound!) and string instruments that used gut (yes, real animal gut) strings rather than metal ones. The metal strings we hear today provide a much brighter sound, and so if you hear an unusual, dull string sound it’s another clue that it might be Baroque.

Aside from instruments, there are other devices used by composers that characterize the period.

If you can hear more than one melodic line at the same time, often carefully interweaving each other, this is called a ‘contrapuntal texture’ and is typical of Baroque style. By the Classical period, this had gone out of fashion and it was much more common to hear a ‘homophonic texture’ (melody and accompaniment).

Another typical feature of Baroque music is the use of ‘terraced dynamics,’ which means that the changes from loud to soft (or vice versa) are sudden rather than gradual. Gradual dynamic changes are rarely heard in Baroque music.

Finally, if you listen to a Baroque melody you will often hear ‘ornaments,’ which are little flourishes (groups of fast notes) that decorate the melody and make it more interesting. They are not essential to the music and are often improvised.

During the Baroque period, composers were employed by the church or very rich patrons. This meant that they had to stick to a huge amount of rules to ensure they kept their jobs. Therefore, Baroque music was not wildly experimental and so if you hear any dramatic or unexpected moments in the music, you’ve probably got the wrong style!

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8 months ago

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